Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2. 10.  1|      see a clear need to adjust concepts in the understanding of
 2    I,     2. 10.  1|         and diseases as well as concepts of prevention and health
 3    I,     2. 10.  1|         challenges the existing concepts of surveillance and health
 4   II,     5.  1.  2|         responds to the various concepts of biomedicine and evidence-based
 5   II,     5.  5.  1| conducted in 1997-98. This “Key Conceptsproject defined and evaluated
 6   II,     5.  5.  1|       and evaluated the central concepts for mental health as well
 7   II,     5. 15.  4|    designation and defining the concepts of "similar medicinal product"
 8   II,     9.  4.  5|      lives using new management concepts, it may be possible to keep
 9  III,    10.  1.  1|         to understand these two concepts and their implications.~ ~
10  III,    10.  1.  2|          Only if the underlying concepts are adequately understood,
11  III,    10.  2.  1|         impact assessment: main concepts and suggested approach.
12  III,    10.  2.  4|         challenges the existing concepts of surveillance and health
13  III,    10.  2.  4|       technologies deserves new concepts in the understanding of
14  III,    10.  2.  4|         diseases as well as new concepts of prevention and health
15  III,    10.  2.  4|       introduction of these new concepts of risk stratification and
16  III,    10.  2.  4|         whether the traditional concepts of health indicators still
17  III,    10.  2.  4|      redefining the methods and concepts developed in the “oldphenotypic
18  III,    10.  2.  4|        a new dimension to these concepts as it calls for an integration
19  III,    10.  5.  3|  although embedded in different concepts, have common goals, characteristics
20   IV,    11.  1.  4|      and Smith 2001). These two concepts of equity are arguably of
21   IV,    11.  3.  2|      are now including economic concepts in applying for reimbursement