Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    I,     2.  5    |         Many women work in the caring services where there are
 2   II,     5.  5.  2| continue to play a key role in caring for people with dementia,
 3   II,     5.  5.  2|      have a regular break from caring (through the provision of
 4   II,     5. 15.  3|        cost of treating RD and caring for patients has not been
 5   II,     9.  2.  2|      States to identifying and caring for children as a group.
 6   II,     9.  2.  3|  adulthood, their economic and caring capacity - including health
 7   II,     9.  2.  6|      seen as a responsible and caring community.~ ~
 8   II,     9.  4.  5|  providers of care. As well as caring for grandchildren and their
 9   II,     9.  4.  5|       devote their energies to caring for relatives at the expense
10   II,     9.  4.  5|     focus on the activities of caring by encouraging the development
11   II,     9.  5.  3|   individual (Probyn, 2000).~ ~Caring duties~ ~Women continue
12   II,     9.  5.  3|      the majority of society’s caring needs. Among those who were
13   II,     9.  5.  3|      Women who had worked in a caring profession were more likely
14   II,     9.  5.  3|      EIWH, 2006).~ ~Reviews of caring responsibilities conducted
15   II,     9.  5.  3|       intensive forms of daily caring: bathing and dressing, care
16   II,     9.  5.  6|        care and caregiving' In Caring for/Caring About: women,
17   II,     9.  5.  6|      caregiving' In Caring for/Caring About: women, home care
18  III,    10.  5.  3|         Many women work in the caring services where there are
19  III,    10.  6.  1|      Wethington E. The cost of caring: a perspective on the relationship
20   IV,    13.  6.  2|    have specialist training in caring for children. This also
21   IV,    13.  9    |      Europe – A Priority for a Caring Society; European Journal