Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  3|           treatment of prodromal syndromes and prevention of psychosis.
 2   II,     5.  5.  3|      although some conditions or syndromes within the spectrum can
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|       the incidence of epileptic syndromes in Europe. In Iceland (Olafsson
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|       Commission, 1989). Special syndromes (represented by an isolated
 5   II,     5.  5.  3|     incidence of the most common syndromes was generally lower. The
 6   II,     5.  5.  3|         distribution of epilepsy syndromes in children and adults.~
 7   II,     5.  5.  3|       the prevalence of epilepsy syndromes has been calculated in several
 8   II,     5.  5.  3|          followed by generalized syndromes (37-48%) and unclassified
 9   II,     5.  5.  3|         37-48%) and unclassified syndromes (5-10%)(Eriksson & Koivikko,
10   II,     5.  5.  3|       The prevalence of specific syndromes in these countries was as
11   II,     5.  5.  3|        heterogeneity of epilepsy syndromes must change. Harmonization
12   II,     5.  5.  3|         epilepsies and epileptic syndromes. Epilepsia 30:389-399.~Commission
13   II,     5.  5.  3|        of epilepsy and epileptic syndromes in children. Epilepsia 38:
14   II,     5.  5.  3|           Incidence of epileptic syndromes. Epilepsia 31:391-396.~Loiseau
15   II,     5.  5.  3|        eg., ‘clinically isolated syndromes’). Identifying benign cases
16   II,     5.  5.  3| treatment of clinically isolated syndromes, secondary progression,
17   II,     5.  5.  3| Parkinson’s disease and akinetic syndromes. Current opinion in neurology
18   II,     5.  7.  1|     abnormalities (renal tubular syndromes)~imaging abnormalities~•
19  III,    10.  2.  4|      disease clusters”, “disease syndromes” and “health outcomes”;~·
20  III,    10.  2.  4|       families based on “disease syndromes” and implement family-oriented