Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     6.Acr    |       PLHIV~People Living with HIV~SARS~Severe Acute Respiratory
 2   II,     6.  3.  1|        high profile crises such as SARS and avian influenza. In
 3   II,     6.  3.  1|        other than health. The 2003 SARS outbreak cost some countries
 4   II,     6.  3.  4|    tuberculosis, legionellosis and SARS.~ ~
 5   II,     6.  3.  4|        acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)~ ~SARS is a viral respiratory
 6   II,     6.  3.  4|      respiratory syndrome (SARS)~ ~SARS is a viral respiratory illness
 7   II,     6.  3.  4|       SARS-CoV). The main way that SARS seems to spread is by close
 8   II,     6.  3.  4|          person coughs or sneezes.~SARS was first recognised as
 9   II,     6.  3.  4|     SARS-CoV had resulted in 8 098 SARS cases in 26 countries, with
10   II,     6.  3.  4|    sustained local transmission of SARS and in the international
11   II,     6.  3.  4|         sporadic imported cases of SARS also appeared in Europe
12   II,     6.  3.  4|      spared from the infection. No SARS cases were reported in the
13   II,     6.  3.  4|            predict when or whether SARS will re-emerge in epidemic
14   II,     6.  3.  4|            form. The resurgence of SARS leading to an outbreak remains
15   II,     6.  3.  4|     respond to the re-emergence of SARS should it occur.~ ~
16   II,     6.  4.  2|           number of events such as SARS, avian influenza in humans
17   II,     6.  4.  3|           collaboration during the SARS epidemic, the Commission
18  III,    10.  3.  3| considerable public health threat. SARS is a viral respiratory illness
19  III,    10.  3.  3|       SARS-CoV); the main way that SARS seems to spread is by close
20  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|      salmonellosis~salt~sanitation~sars~schizophrenia~school~schools~