Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  1|       McGonagle K, Liu G (1996): Comorbidity of DSM-III-R major depressive
 2   II,     5.  5.  1|     results from the US National Comorbidity Survey. Br J Psychiatry
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|       Woolson RF (2006): Medical comorbidity in women and men with schizophrenia:
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|      Judd LL, Goodwin FK (1990): Comorbidity of mental disorders with
 5   II,     5.  5.  3|       alcohol abuse. Psychiatric comorbidity, psychosocial stressors
 6   II,     5.  5.  3|    cardiac autonomic function.~ ~Comorbidity~The term “comorbidity” is
 7   II,     5.  5.  3|            Comorbidity~The termcomorbidity” is used here to define
 8   II,     5.  5.  3|      2002) and the prevalence of comorbidity in patients with epilepsy (
 9   II,     5.  5.  3|          somatic and psychiatric comorbidity in adults was undertaken
10   II,     5.  5.  3|     six-fold risk of psychiatric comorbidity was found in patients aged
11   II,     5.  5.  3|          The epidemiology of the comorbidity of epilepsy in the general
12   II,     5.  5.  3|          disorders. Furthermore, comorbidity in MS and associated symptoms (
13   II,     5.  5.  3| treatment (Uitti et al, 1993).~ ~Comorbidity~Comorbidity is common in
14   II,     5.  5.  3|         al, 1993).~ ~Comorbidity~Comorbidity is common in patients with
15   II,     5.  6.  3|          of advanced age or with comorbidity. Pain and loss of spinal
16   II,     5.  6.  3|       Sernbo and Johnell, 1993). Comorbidity is an important contributory
17   II,     5.  7.  7|       chronic kidney disease and comorbidity among enrollees in a large
18   II,     5.  8.  7|      Deeg DJ, Stalman WA (2004): Comorbidity of somatic chronic diseases
19   II,     5.  9.  7|            Allergic rhinitis and comorbidity in a survey of young adults
20   IV,    13.  2.  2|          disorders. Furthermore, comorbidity in MS and associated symptoms (