Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  2|           where the emphasis is on relatives providing care (e.g. in
 2   II,     5.  5.  2|           virtually inexistent and relatives may even be legally obliged
 3   II,     5.  5.  2|            their elderly dependent relatives.~ ~In 2007, Alzheimer Europe
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|           and three with patientsrelatives) (Figure 5.5.3.3.6). Internalized
 5   II,     5.  5.  3|   schizophrenia from patients’ and relativesview: A pilot study in
 6   II,     5.  5.  3|            towards patients, their relatives and all potentially involved
 7   II,     5.  5.  3|          on PD for patients, their relatives and the public. National
 8   II,     5.  5.  3| traditional support given by their relatives. The most common living
 9   II,     5.  5.  3|            able to rely upon their relatives for help and care or financial
10   II,     5.  9. FB|          for atopy in first-degree relatives are more susceptible to
11   II,     5.  9.  4|             OR = 0.5); presence of relatives in the bedroom in initial
12   II,     9.  4.  5| traditional support given by their relatives. The most common living
13   II,     9.  4.  5|            able to rely upon their relatives for help and care or financial
14   II,     9.  4.  5|       their energies to caring for relatives at the expense of their
15   II,     9.  5.  3|       older and disabled partners, relatives and friends (Age Concern,
16  III,    10.  6.  1|    existence of a spouse, friends, relatives or belonging to associations
17   IV,    11.  5.  4|       donation is not presented to relatives.~In some Member States,
18   IV,    11.  5.  4|           organs of their deceased relatives fluctuate in Europe from
19   IV,    11.  5.  4|  communicate their wishes to their relatives. Only 41% of European citizens