Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  2.  3|        show that incidence was falling rapidly in most people living
 2   II,     5.  2.  3|    Northern countries, but not falling as fast in the populations
 3   II,     5.  2.  3|      mortality rates have been falling faster for men than for
 4   II,     5.  2.  5|         Unal et al, 2005).~The falling rates have resulted in longer
 5   II,     5.  6.  3|   determinants of fracture are falling, low bone mass, i.e. osteoporosis,
 6   II,     5.  6.  3|     bone strength. The risk of falling increases with age. Hip
 7   II,     5.  6.  3|        5.6.8. Risk Factors for Falling in the Elderly~ ~Table 5.
 8   II,     5. 14.  3|        diseases and disorders, falling disproportionately upon
 9   II,     9        |      aged over 80. The risk of falling increases exponentially
10   II,     9        |      ability, but a history of falling has also been identified
11   II,     9.  3.  1|      more older women than men falling, men have a higher mortality
12   II,     9.  4.  3|      ability, but a history of falling has also been identified
13   II,     9.  4.  4|      aged over 80. The risk of falling increases exponentially
14   II,     9.  4.  4|      ability, but a history of falling has also been identified
15  III,    10.  2.  1|        for opioid use has been falling until recently in many countries (
16  III,    10.  2.  1| recruitment into heroin use is falling, those experiencing problems
17   IV,    11.  5.  1|     hospitals or professionals falling under different jurisdictions.
18   IV,    11.  6.  2|        contribution mechanisms falling into two categories: public
19   IV,    13.  7.  2|        lot more patents.~After falling further behind Japan in