Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  3|         Am 30(3):437-52.~Carney CP, Jones L, Woolson RF (2006):
 2   II,     5.  5.  3| Schürmann A, Michels R, Malchow CP, Dilling H (2002): Comparison
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|      process of cerebral palsy (CP) and ASD data in the EU.
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|        and chronic progressive (CP)- or PP-MS (Ebers, 1998)
 5   II,     5.  8.  7|         S, Sorel M, Quesenberry CP Jr, DeLuise C, Lanes S,
 6   II,     5.  8.  7|        1139-1145.~ ~Van Schayck CP, Loozen JM, Wagena E, Akkermans
 7   II,     5.  8.  7|         Wouters EF, van Schayck CP. Psychological distress
 8   II,     9.  1.  1|         palsy~ ~Cerebral Palsy (CP) is the most common disabling
 9   II,     9.  1.  1|        Challenges in Monitoring~CP is a recommended indicator
10   II,     9.  1.  1|       adverse perinatal events. CP is an umbrella term and
11   II,     9.  1.  1|         of monitoring trends in CP rates and providing a framework
12   II,     9.  1.  1|      here concern children with CP born 1990-1998, ascertained
13   II,     9.  1.  1|         excluding post-neonatal CP cases acquired during 1990-
14   II,     9.  1.  1|      1998~ ~Among children with CP, some have a severe clinical
15   II,     9.  1.  1|   children have a mild clinical CP type, i.e. they walk without
16   II,     9.  1.  1|       over time in this rate of CP.~ ~Table 9.1.1.5. Proportion
17   II,     9.  1.  1|     that the risk of developing CP is 60 to 100 times higher
18   II,     9.  1.  1|   birth weight/term babies. The CP rate among VLBW children
19   II,     9.  1.  1|  countries. The overall rate of CP in VLBW has been decreasing
20   II,     9.  1.  1|         2007).~ ~Table 9.1.1.6. CP rates among VLBW babies
21   II,     9.  1.  1|  Grimace, Activity, Respiration~CP~Cerebral Palsy~HIE~Hypoxic
22   II,     9.  3.  3|    Cielo A, Greco M, de Somenzi CP, Chironna M, Quarto M (2006):