Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  4.  1|        most countries worldwide (King 1998; Wild 2004). In the
 2   II,     5.  4.  1|        and developing countries (King 1998; Wild 2004).~ ~Figure
 3  III,    10.  1.  1|         regulation (Blundell and King, 1998; Melzer et al, 2005).
 4  III,    10.  1.  1|     increases in caloric intake (King, 1999; King et al, 1997;
 5  III,    10.  1.  1|      caloric intake (King, 1999; King et al, 1997; Melzer et al,
 6  III,    10.  1.  1|     environmental contingencies (King, 1998). In addition, only
 7  III,    10.  1.  1|    exercise-induced hyperphagia (King et al, 1997). In lean people,
 8  III,    10.  1.  1| low-intensity physical activity (King et al, 1997; Melzer et al,
 9  III,    10.  1.  1|      calories from carbohydrate (King et al, 1997). Highly active
10  III,    10.  1.  1|          reasons for exercising (King, 1999; King et al, 1997;
11  III,    10.  1.  1|          exercising (King, 1999; King et al, 1997; Parsons et
12  III,    10.  1.  1|      physical activity and diet (King et al, 1997). In addition,
13  III,    10.  1.  1|          following the exercise (King, 1999). A clear understanding
14  III,    10.  1.  3|      Suppl:48S-56S.~Blundell JE, King NA (1998): Effects of exercise
15  III,    10.  1.  3|         31(11) Suppl 1:S534-541.~King NA (1998): The relationship
16  III,    10.  1.  3|          Proc Nutr Soc 57:77-84.~King NA (1999): What processes
17  III,    10.  1.  3|        Proc Nutr Soc 58:107-113.~King NA, Tremblay A, Blundell
18  III,    10.  1.  3|           Dubbert PM, Sallis JF, King AC, Yancey AK, Franklin