Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1    -,     1        |      determinants underlying the evolution of health indicators, and
 2    I,     2.  5    |          transition are still in evolution. The age at which people
 3    I,     2. 10.  2|       the current stage of rapid evolution of nanoscience and nanotechnology
 4   II,     5.  3.  1|       indicators to describe the evolution of cancer in a particular
 5   II,     5.  7.  3|         CV complications and for evolution to ESRD (Go et al, 2004) -
 6   II,     5.  9. FB|         and then to asthma. This evolution, known as “allergy march”,
 7   II,     5.  9.  4|       The evidence of a possible evolution from one pathology to another
 8   II,     5. 14.  5|         oral health sector, this evolution implies a broader concept
 9   II,     7.  5    |   information and to monitor the evolution of injury risks. Special
10   II,     9        |       primary determinant of the evolution of the adverse risk profile.
11   II,     9.  1.  1|         1.1 and 9.1.1.2 show the evolution of neonatal and foetal mortality
12   II,     9.  3.  1|       primary determinant of the evolution of the adverse risk profile.
13   II,     9.  3.  2|      services.~ ~Figure 9.3.2.4. Evolution of length of stay in hospital
14   II,     9.  5.  2|        simultaneously assess the evolution of mortality, morbidity
15  III,    10.  2.  1|               Lopez A (2005) The evolution of the Global Burden of
16  III,    10.  4.  2|      cloning, and the relentless evolution of scientific knowledge,
17  III,    10.  4.  2|         useful to understand the evolution of Community Regulations.
18  III,    10.  4.  2| technologies, and the relentless evolution of scientific knowledge,