Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  4.  1|        diabetes report erectile dysfunction/ impotence; this percentage
 2   II,     5.  5.  3|      type 2 diabetes, menstrual dysfunction, amenorrhea and potential
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|     hallucinations, behavioural dysfunction and cognitive deficits as
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|        pain sensitivity, sexual dysfunction, obstetric complications,
 5   II,     5.  5.  3|    paroxysmal episodes of brain dysfunction characterized by stereotyped
 6   II,     5.  5.  3|       bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction, psychiatric and psychological
 7   II,     9.  3.  1|          For instance, erectile dysfunction is much more widespread
 8   II,     9.  3.  1|       can also lead to erectile dysfunction, increased risk of dementia
 9   II,     9.  3.  1|       eye disease.~ ~ ~Erectile Dysfunction~ ~Erectile dysfunction (
10   II,     9.  3.  1| Erectile Dysfunction~ ~Erectile dysfunction (ED) describes ‘an inability
11   II,     9.  3.  1|        to the topic of erectile dysfunction has been the Massachusetts
12   II,     9.  3.  1|        men suffer from erectile dysfunction worldwide with a prediction
13   II,     9.  3.  1|  worldwide increase in erectile dysfunction between 1995 and 2025 and
14   II,     9.  3.  1|        Epidemiology of erectile dysfunction: results of the 'Cologne
15   II,     9.  3.  1|       Padley, S (2008) Erectile dysfunction and silent coronary artery
16   II,     9.  3.  1|       Shah, J., (2002) Erectile dysfunction through the ages. British
17   II,     9.  3.  1|    Consumer Affairs~ED~Erectile Dysfunction~EU~European Union~EUROCARE~
18  III,    10.  2.  5|     rare these days), placental dysfunction, gestational diabetes or