Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  2| quantitative estimates through the qualitative assessment of evidence.
 2   II,     5.  5.  3|            3.1.2. Data sources~ ~ ~Qualitative methods for measuring eating
 3   II,     5.  5.  3|       measuring eating disorders~ ~Qualitative studies with a small sample
 4   II,     5.  5.  3|          Rigby, in press). Mostly, qualitative studies are cross-sectional
 5   II,     5.  5.  3|         measurement methods survey qualitative data, in doing so the Eating
 6   II,     5.  5.  3|        Luce et al, 2008). Finally, qualitative data and qualitative measurement
 7   II,     5.  5.  3|      Finally, qualitative data and qualitative measurement methods do not
 8   II,     5.  9.  4|           investigated the role of qualitative differences in particulate
 9   II,     9.  2.  2|  Perspective: There is a place for qualitative data to supplement the quantitative.
10   II,     9.  3.  1|           but some serve to supply qualitative back-up to the more statistical
11   II,     9.  5.  2|          that they serve to supply qualitative back-up to some of the more
12  III,    10.  2.  1|      include both quantitative and qualitative changes in the diet (WHO,
13  III,    10.  4.  2|    decisions on:~ ~· The choice of qualitative and/or quantitative approaches,
14  III,    10.  4.  2|       assessment and evaluates the qualitative and quantitative probability
15   IV,    11.  6.  2|          scale, recent surveys and qualitative studies indicate that informal
16   IV,    11.  6.  4|           nature but some are more qualitative) (Vaughan and Morrow, 1989).
17   IV,    12.  5    |         indicators and including a qualitative and quantitative analysis.~ ~