Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

 1   II,     5.  5.  3|       factors (14-21%) followed by trauma (2-16%) and neoplasms (6-
 2   II,     5.  6.  3|           20-30% (Felson, 1996).~ ~Trauma, particularly in men, is
 3   II,     5.  6.  3|               Osteoporosis and low trauma fractures~ ~Definition~ ~
 4   II,     5.  6.  3|        pain, with or without minor trauma, and thoracolumbar spine
 5   II,     5.  6.  3|     osteoporosis, and previous low trauma fracture. There are risk
 6   II,     5.  6.  5|        rheumatology, orthopaedics, trauma, public health, health promotion
 7   II,     5. 11.  1|          ultraviolet radiation and trauma. The skin is essential for
 8   II,     5. 14.  1|   oropharyngeal cancers and dental trauma are major public health
 9   II,     7.  1    |      evidence that improvements in trauma care have led to a significant
10   II,     7.  1    |        reduction in mortality from trauma. Most of these measures
11   II,     7.  6    |           medical treatment ( e.g. trauma and emergency care). This
12   II,     8.  2.  1|          soon after birth (such as trauma and asphyxia). Still other
13   II,     9        |          acquired by illness or by trauma at a subsequent stage. A
14   II,     9.  1.  1|         morbidity~F: Prevalence of trauma to the perineum~F: Prevalence
15   II,     9.  2.  3|          presentations to hospital trauma units, and/or hospital admissions.
16   II,     9.  2.  3|         setting. A large amount of trauma will also be managed in
17   II,     9.  2.  4|          acquired by illness or by trauma at a subsequent stage. A
18   II,     9.  2.  5|            invasive facilities and trauma departments.~ ~More than
19  III,    10.  5.  2|            increased prevalence of trauma, pregnancies, infections,
20   IV,    13.  6.  2|  appropriate separate faculties in trauma and accident units and in
21  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0| transplanted~transplants~transport~trauma~travel-associated~travellers~