1-500 | 501-886
    Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    -,     1            |                 technical, political and social factors. Cross-country comparisons
  2    I,     2.  1        |               world with their different social environments and microbiological
  3    I,     2.  1        |                 the European population. Social policies, renowned for their
  4    I,     2.  1        |         health-in-all policies approach. Social protection should ensure
  5    I,     2.  1        |               employed in the health and social work sector. Moreover, the
  6    I,     2.  2        |           Moreover, with their different social environments and microbiological
  7    I,     2.  3        |             services demand. Poverty and social uneasiness among non-EU
  8    I,     2.  3        |                  face special health and social problems. Moreover, voluntary
  9    I,     2.  3        |                  and serious medical and social consequences of this practice
 10    I,     2.  4        |                 neighbourhoods), between social groups and also between
 11    I,     2.  4        |       highlighted in the Joint Report on Social Protection and Social Inclusion (
 12    I,     2.  4        |                 on Social Protection and Social Inclusion (European Commission,
 13    I,     2.  4        |              European Commission, 2008), social and economic policies can
 14    I,     2.  4        |             supportive. In recent years, social protection reforms and active
 15    I,     2.  4        |           margins of society and enhance social cohesion. Preventing and
 16    I,     2.  4        |                 and tackling poverty and social exclusion, as well as modernising
 17    I,     2.  4        |                   as well as modernising social protection, combining both
 18    I,     2.  4        |               protection, combining both social adequacy and economic sustainability
 19    I,     2.  4        |                 neighbourhoods), between social groups and also between
 20    I,     2.  4        |                all through well-designed social policies, and strengthening
 21    I,     2.  4        |              minorities (Joint Report on Social Protection and Social Inclusion,
 22    I,     2.  4        |                 on Social Protection and Social Inclusion, 2008). When children
 23    I,     2.  4        |                  breakdown of protective social, public health and healthcare
 24    I,     2.  4        |            Countries”. DG Employment and Social Affairs, 2004. As retired
 25    I,     2.  4        |         healthcare remains uneven across social groups. A major challenge
 26    I,     2.  4        |              comprehensively by reducing social differences, preventing
 27    I,     2.  4        |               provision (Joint Report on Social Protection and Social Inclusion,
 28    I,     2.  4        |                 on Social Protection and Social Inclusion, 2008).~ ~ ~
 29    I,     2.  5        |    administration; education; health and social work; community and personal
 30    I,     2.  5        |                 in delivering health and social services care in the community,
 31    I,     2.  5        |            Commission, DG Employment and Social Affairs, released the Communication
 32    I,     2.  5        |         contribute to a sounder base for social protection systems and adequacy
 33    I,     2.  5        |                  financial, economic and social sustainability. Awareness
 34    I,     2.  5        |                literacy (Joint Report on Social Protection and Social Inclusion,
 35    I,     2.  5        |                 on Social Protection and Social Inclusion, 2008).~ ~Consequences
 36    I,     2.  6        |                  actively participate in social and economic life. It should
 37    I,     2.  6        |                  contexts of working and social life, the need emerges for
 38    I,     2.  6        |                 is also important in the social context. How to succeed
 39    I,     2.  7        |                But the growing economic, social and cultural significance
 40    I,     2.  7        |          creativity, economic growth and social conflict. In 1950, just
 41    I,     2.  9        |         irreversible, leading to adverse social, economic and environmental
 42    I,     2. 10.  1    |                   besides environmental, social and lifestyles factors,
 43    I,     2. 10.  3    |                 has dramatically changed social, institutional and diplomatic
 44    I,     2. 11        |               APPLICA (2005): Network on Social Inclusion and Income Distribution
 45    I,     2. 11        |              European Observatory on the Social Situation and Demography (
 46    I,     2. 11        |         Demography (EU DG Employment and Social Affairs). December 2005 [
 47    I,     2. 11        |                  ec.europa.eu/employment_social/social_situation/docs/sso2005_
 48    I,     2. 11        |              europa.eu/employment_social/social_situation/docs/sso2005_social_
 49    I,     2. 11        |            social_situation/docs/sso2005_social_inclusion_report.pdf]~Arcury,
 50    I,     2. 11        |                   2008): Joint Report on Social Protection and Social Inclusion
 51    I,     2. 11        |                 on Social Protection and Social Inclusion 2008 – Social
 52    I,     2. 11        |                  Social Inclusion 2008Social inclusion, pensions, healthcare
 53    I,     2. 11        |                  ec.europa.eu/employment_social/spsi/docs/social_inclusion/
 54    I,     2. 11        |              employment_social/spsi/docs/social_inclusion/2008/joint_report_
 55    I,     3.  3        |                  dynamics, also changing social, economical and political
 56   II,     4.  1        |              full employment and greater social cohesion across the EU.~ ~
 57   II,     5.  1.  1    |             diagnosed mental disorders); social isolation; physical illness;
 58   II,     5.  1.  1    |            suicide.~ ~· Eating disorders~Social pressure to be thin, fitter
 59   II,     5.  1.  1    |               are not only influenced by social factors, but rather anorexia
 60   II,     5.  1.  1    |                   interpersonal factors, social factors as well as biological
 61   II,     5.  1.  1    |                physical or sexual abuse.~Social Factors: cultural pressure
 62   II,     5.  1.  1    |               regular moderate exercise, social contact and mental stimulation.
 63   II,     5.  1.  1    |           difficult to disentangle other social factors which are associated
 64   II,     5.  1.  3    |          personal, family, professional, social, economic, etc. -, have
 65   II,     5.  1.  4    |                effectively with the many social counterparts including one’
 66   II,     5.  2.  1    |             mortality) (2733 Employment, Social Policy, Health and Consumer
 67   II,     5.  2.  1    |               related to health care and social services, but are also linked
 68   II,     5.  2.  3    |           Eastern Europe. The political, social and economic transition
 69   II,     5.  2.  5    |           Presidency. (276th Employment, Social Policy, Health and Consumer
 70   II,     5.  2.  7    |                  2006): 2733 Employment, Social Policy, Health and Consumer
 71   II,     5.  3.  2    |              impact of environmental and social factors on cancer risk and
 72   II,     5.  3.  2    |              access to treatment between social groups. To perform these
 73   II,     5.  3.  7    |                  is an extremely complex social undertaking, which involves
 74   II,     5.  4.  1    |                  interaction of genetic, social and environmental factors
 75   II,     5.  4.  4    |              literature that the current social trends also push for worsened
 76   II,     5.  4.  6    |              diabetes at the Employment, Social Policy, Health and Consumer
 77   II,     5.  4.  6    |            secondary and community care, social services and education services;~·
 78   II,     5.  4.  8    |             diabetes, 2733rd Employment, Social Policy, Health and Consumer
 79   II,     5.  5.Int    |               stigma, discrimination and social exclusion. The impact on
 80   II,     5.  5.Int    |              Individuals most at risk of social isolation and anxiety are
 81   II,     5.  5.Int(11)|              Mental Health: Gender Bias, Social Position, and Depression.
 82   II,     5.  5.Int    |             inpatient care11,12. Women’s social roles as primary carers
 83   II,     5.  5.Int    |    responsibilities. This contributes to social isolation and further impacts
 84   II,     5.  5.Int    |             health and wellbeing such as social relationship, poverty, and
 85   II,     5.  5.Int    |                  of adequate housing and social networks may result in people
 86   II,     5.  5.Int    |              medical training, increased social awareness and better access
 87   II,     5.  5.Int    |              includes a higher burden on social security systems and brings
 88   II,     5.  5.Int    |               genetic, environmental and social factors. An individual with
 89   II,     5.  5.Int    |        Initiatives under the Community’s social and employment policy targeted
 90   II,     5.  5.Int    |              with mental ill health, the social inclusion of people with
 91   II,     5.  5.Int    |              work-related Stress between social partners in 2004.~ ~The
 92   II,     5.  5.Int    |          training courses for health and social care professionals; combating
 93   II,     5.  5.Int    |           combating stigma and promoting social inclusion.~An internet tool (www u)
 94   II,     5.  5.  1    |           life-events as well as lack of social support increase the risk
 95   II,     5.  5.  1    |                substantial impairment in social and working life, causing
 96   II,     5.  5.  1    |                  psychiatric conditions, social exclusion at individual (
 97   II,     5.  5.  1    |        initiatives under the Community’s social and employment policy have
 98   II,     5.  5.  1    |               with mental disorders, the social inclusion of people with
 99   II,     5.  5.  2    |               regular moderate exercise, social contact and mental stimulation.
100   II,     5.  5.  2    |           difficult to disentangle other social factors which are associated
101   II,     5.  5.  2    |         healthcare system and/or through social welfare services. In some
102   II,     5.  5.  2    |             services. In some countries, social support for people with
103   II,     5.  5.  2    |                 to prevent isolation and social withdrawal not only of the
104   II,     5.  5.  2    |                  EuroCoDe, WP4 survey on social support provided to people
105   II,     5.  5.  3    |         resources (Berkman et al, 2007). Social pressure to be thin, fitter
106   II,     5.  5.  3    |               are not only influenced by social factors; actually anorexia
107   II,     5.  5.  3    |                   interpersonal factors, social factors as well as biological
108   II,     5.  5.  3    |              physical or sexual abuse;~· Social Factors: cultural pressure
109   II,     5.  5.  3    |                particular in maintaining social contacts and functioning
110   II,     5.  5.  3    |              community and improve their social functioning. Unfortunately,
111   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 as increased reliance on social care and welfare support (
112   II,     5.  5.  3    |                et al, 2006).~Deficits in social abilities often lead to
113   II,     5.  5.  3    |            reducing these impairments in social functioning is one of the
114   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 of innovative drugs.~The social situationliving and performance
115   II,     5.  5.  3    |                living and performance of social roles – is an important
116   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 to an improvement of the social situation. What really matters
117   II,     5.  5.  3    |               they are able to establish social relationships, to live with
118   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  partner etc. Therefore, social outcome should be given
119   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 2007). The importance of social outcome is also reflected
120   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 loss of occupational and social functioning. Their risk
121   II,     5.  5.  3    |       improvement of symptoms as well as social adjustment. Yet the limited
122   II,     5.  5.  3    |               unmet needs was related to social and interpersonal functioning (
123   II,     5.  5.  3    |                hopelessness, and reduced social contacts (Lysaker et al,
124   II,     5.  5.  3    |               more general influences on social distance (Gaebel et al,
125   II,     5.  5.  3    |              respective expenditures for social welfare, disability pensions
126   II,     5.  5.  3    |               2010. Combating stigma and social exclusion is a priority
127   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  regards to the enormous social burden it is indispensable~·
128   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  working environment and social life in general, as major
129   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  Changes in the public's social distance toward individuals
130   II,     5.  5.  3    |                S28-S32.~Priebe S (2007): Social outcomes in schizophrenia.
131   II,     5.  5.  3    |             autistic behaviours, such as social withdrawal, insistence on
132   II,     5.  5.  3    |         hand-wringing, body rocking, and social withdrawal. Individuals
133   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  attention deficits, and social problems. Opposite to many
134   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  months of intellectual, social and language functioning.
135   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  is marked impairment of social interaction, communication,
136   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  Equally, in Europe, the social and economic burden of ASD
137   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  generated by health and social care provision (59%), followed
138   II,     5.  5.  3    |           training of a range of health, social care and education and commissioning
139   II,     5.  5.  3    |             family, on the emotional and social impact of the seizures,
140   II,     5.  5.  3    |               prevalence of epilepsy and social deprivation, defined by
141   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  of employment problems. Social stigma has long been considered
142   II,     5.  5.  3    |      opportunities in several aspects of social life. This issue is further
143   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 Ahmed Z, Kerr MP (2000): Social deprivation and prevalence
144   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 The RESt-1 Group (2000): Social aspects of epilepsy in the
145   II,     5.  5.  3    |               disorder with considerable social impact and economic consequences
146   II,     5.  5.  3    |                of the disease, and their social situation in Germany. To
147   II,     5.  5.  3    |                disease in the future.~MS social costs are high. Cost data
148   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 20% of the total costs). Social services only represent
149   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  pain, role-emotion, and social function, regardless of
150   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 significant economic and social responsibilities. A European
151   II,     5.  5.  3    |         necessary work adaptations and a social protection safety net to
152   II,     5.  5.  3    |            workplace characteristics and social support. With the exception
153   II,     5.  5.  3    |              barriers or other cultural, social, psychological or physical
154   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  as in relation to their social and family environment,
155   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  or no-profit health and social services providers, employers
156   II,     5.  5.  3    |        appropriately flexible labour and social policies for people with
157   II,     5.  5.  3    |             societies in contributing to social policy changes.~The EMSP
158   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 therapies, reviewing the social support and benefits of
159   II,     5.  5.  3    |              well as for community care. Social services and private expenses
160   II,     5.  5.  3    |            teachers, medical workers, or social service workers. Taken together,
161   II,     5.  5.  3    |              2297-2305.~Singer E (1973): Social costs of Parkinson’s disease.
162   II,     5.  6.  1    |               major burden on health and social care, are one of the most
163   II,     5.  6.  3    |         consequence of work loss, and of social and health care. There is
164   II,     5.  6.  3    |            consequences of work loss and social support.~ ~The problem is
165   II,     5.  6.  4    |                 resources for health and social care. Most of the costs
166   II,     5.  6.  4    |           related to work disability and social care, with a minor part
167   II,     5.  6.  6    |              differences in age, gender, social class, and pain localization.
168   II,     5.  6.  6    |                 Department of Health and Social Services, UK (1989): OPCS
169   II,     5.  6.  6    |               sites, and the relation to social deprivation. Ann Rheum Dis
170   II,     5.  7.  4    |              these links actually exist. Social inequalities affect the
171   II,     5.  8.  7    |                2006): In “Population and social conditions”, 10/2006, Eurostat.~ ~
172   II,     5.  9. FB    |                the improved hygienic and social conditions, causes a significant
173   II,     5.  9.  1    |             impairment in activities and social functioning (Skoner, 2001).~ ~
174   II,     5.  9.  1    |                 physical, emotional, and social effects, leading to a reduced
175   II,     5.  9.  4    |               from local families of low social status. In the German Health
176   II,     5. 10.  1    |              fear of severe reactions in social eating occasions complicate
177   II,     5. 10.  1    |               activities and can lead to social isolation and psychological
178   II,     5. 10.  4    |              calculate the real cost and social burden linked to them and
179   II,     5. 10.  4    |                  or lactating women.~The social burden of FA and intolerance
180   II,     5. 10.  4    |             restrict food choices, limit social occasions linked to food
181   II,     5. 10.  4    |                  in the long run lead to social isolation and mental health
182   II,     5. 10.  6    |                choice and the quality of social life of food allergic individuals (
183   II,     5. 10.  7    |              framework for measuring the social impact of food allergy across
184   II,     5. 11.  1    |             organ in the body with vital social functions.~are very common
185   II,     5. 11.  1    |               also an important organ of social and sexual contact. Perhaps
186   II,     5. 11.  1    |                frequently underestimated social function.~Historically there
187   II,     5. 11.  3    |                 status with accompanying social costs (Dalgard et al, 2003).~
188   II,     5. 11.  3    |               impact on wellness and the social abilities of adolescents,
189   II,     5. 11.  3    |               childhood shows a striking social class gradient for both
190   II,     5. 12.  5    |            policies in order to increase social acceptability of such measures.~ ~
191   II,     5. 13        |               actually need less energy. Social and economic pressures can
192   II,     5. 14.  1    |              intensive service with high social utility. The overall aim
193   II,     5. 14.  3    |               health is characterized by social inequalities in the face
194   II,     5. 14.  3    |               eating, communication, and social interaction, while 18·7%
195   II,     5. 14.  3    |                functioning together with social functioning is one of the
196   II,     5. 14.  3    |                  profoundly affect one’s social life, make people avoid
197   II,     5. 14.  3    |                an important component of social behaviour in the ageing
198   II,     5. 14.  5    |           inequalities with reference to social policies enabling goals.
199   II,     5. 14.  5    |                  to care, or in terms of social life involvement of entire
200   II,     5. 15.  1    |                information and training, social benefits, hospitalisation
201   II,     6.  3.  4    |              epidemic caused significant social and economic disruption
202   II,     6.  3.  6    |                  had profound political, social and economic implications.
203   II,     6.  4.  3    |             losses, ethical dilemmas and social disruption.~ ~The European
204   II,     7.  1        |        implementation to reduce the huge social toll of accidents and injuries,
205   II,     7.  2.  4    |              work, either to the public (Social Security) or private specific
206   II,     7.  2.  4    |               which have a « universal » Social Security system. For accidents
207   II,     7.  3.  4    |                 sector, consumer safety, social welfare, etc.). This makes
208   II,     7.  3.  5    |                 as:~ ~· mental illnesssocial isolation~· a previous suicide
209   II,     7.  4        |                 Unequal in its impact on social groups: The risk of dying
210   II,     7.  4        |                according to sex, age and social status.~ ~The European Community
211   II,     7.  4        |             identify priority areas:~ ~· Social impact of injuries in terms
212   II,     7.  4.  6    |              feelings of hopelessness;~· social and environmental factors,
213   II,     7.  4.  6    |              herbicides and pesticides), social isolation and economic hardship.~ ~
214   II,     7.  4.  6    |                 to emotional well-being, social integration through participation
215   II,     7.  4.  6    |              based on skill training and social support appeared to be effective
216   II,     7.  4.  7    |                 work). It undermines the social and economic conditions
217   II,     7.  4.  7    |                individual, relationship, social, cultural and environmental
218   II,     7.  4.  7    |               biological, psychological, social and environmental roots,
219   II,     7.  4.  7    |          Addressing the larger cultural, social and economic factors that
220   II,     7.  6        |            challenge, while gaps between social classes do not tend to narrow
221   II,     7.  6        |               not tend to narrow and the social coherence might deteriorate.
222   II,     8.  1.  1    |                pathology or deficit) or “social” (the result of social failure
223   II,     8.  1.  1    |                   social” (the result of social failure in providing access
224   II,     8.  1.  1    |           expression of limitations in a social context (Schalock et al,
225   II,     8.  1.  1    |               such as the environment or social attitudes. This approach
226   II,     8.  1.  2    |             statistics on disability and social integration in order to
227   II,     8.  1.  2    |                to health, disability and social integration.~ ~ ~
228   II,     8.  1.  4    |                 module on Disability and Social Integration (EDSIM). This
229   II,     8.  1.  5    |             barriers in the economic and social environment that prevent
230   II,     8.  1.  5(7) |               ensure their independence, social and occupational integration
231   II,     8.  2.  1    |               and excluded from ordinary social relations. Although it is
232   II,     8.  2.  1    |                 expressed in conceptual, social, and practical adaptive
233   II,     8.  2.  1    |                  recall that poverty and social disadvantage are strongly
234   II,     8.  2.  1    |              conditions, less favourable social circumstances typically
235   II,     8.  2.  1    |           considered within individualssocial and economic environments.
236   II,     8.  2.  1    |                  Walsh 2005). Reflecting social policies in the Member States
237   II,     8.  2.  1    |                  Member States favouring social inclusion, more middle-aged
238   II,     8.  2.  1    |                  seek generic health and social services as they age. Improving
239   II,     8.  2.  1    |                 socio-economic position, social capital and the health of
240   II,     8.  2.  3    |                educational disadvantage, social isolation and stigmatisation.
241   II,     8.  2.  3    |             System~EDSIM:~Disability and Social Integration~EHSS:~European
242   II,     9            |             mortality is associated with social and health care factors,
243   II,     9            |            health outcomes are linked to social factors (Kaminski et al,
244   II,     9            |               childbearing are a complex social phenomenon, but are associated
245   II,     9            |            little or no insight into the social contexts and cultural roles
246   II,     9            |               regarding its effects, and social norms regarding drunken
247   II,     9            |                beliefs and expectancies (Social Issues Research Centre,
248   II,     9            |               actually need less energy. Social and economic pressures can
249   II,     9            |                 countries (WHO, 1999).~ ~Social factors. Social factors,
250   II,     9            |                 1999).~ ~Social factors. Social factors, which the individual
251   II,     9.  1        |                  Europe: poverty and low social status are associated with
252   II,     9.  1        |                and interventions, reduce social inequalities in health and
253   II,     9.  1.  1    |              infant mortality: trends by social class, registration status,
254   II,     9.  1.  2    |               financial cost of medical, social and educational services
255   II,     9.  1.  2    |                  have important medical, social or educational needs.~ ~
256   II,     9.  1.  2    |             mortality is associated with social and health care factors,
257   II,     9.  1.  2    |            health outcomes are linked to social factors (Kaminski et al,
258   II,     9.  1.  2    |               childbearing are a complex social phenomenon, but are associated
259   II,     9.  1.  2    |                needs to be understood at social level, in order to create
260   II,     9.  2.  1    |       adolescentsphysical, mental, and social health. Areas of development
261   II,     9.  2.  1    |         maturation, and psychosocial and social maturation. Physical development
262   II,     9.  2.  1    |                five years of life, while social and behavioural patterns
263   II,     9.  2.  1    |                  supportive familial and social context. Good physical and
264   II,     9.  2.  2    |                   Topics covered include social exclusion, architectural
265   II,     9.  2.  2    |                  is also the period when social attitudes mature, linking
266   II,     9.  2.  2    |                 cultures. Structural and social contexts such as school
267   II,     9.  2.  3    |                  For both biological and social reasons, women are becoming
268   II,     9.  2.  3    |              self-esteem, depression and social exclusion. It is associated
269   II,     9.  2.  3    |                associated with academic, social and behavioural problems
270   II,     9.  2.  3    |                and is becoming a complex social phenomenon. Suicide rates
271   II,     9.  2.  4    |            little or no insight into the social contexts and cultural roles
272   II,     9.  2.  4    |               regarding its effects, and social norms regarding drunken
273   II,     9.  2.  4    |                beliefs and expectancies (Social Issues Research Centre,
274   II,     9.  2.  5    |           European Region, addresses the social and economic factors that
275   II,     9.  2.  6    |                  transport, environment, social policy and poverty alleviation,
276   II,     9.  2.  7    |              Semin Perinatol. 28:81-7.~ ~Social Issues Research Centre (
277   II,     9.  2.  7    |                 Centre (1998): Report on Social and cultural aspects of
278   II,     9.  2.  7    |               http://www.sirc.org/publik/social_drinking.pdf#search=%22social%
279   II,     9.  2.  7    |               and Prospects; Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, Helsinki.~ ~
280   II,     9.  3.  1    |              includes a higher burden on social security systems and brings
281   II,     9.  3.  1    |                  of adequate housing and social networks may result in people
282   II,     9.  3.  1    |              Individuals most at risk of social isolation and anxiety are
283   II,     9.  3.  1    |              Myers et al, 2005). Women’s social roles as primary carers
284   II,     9.  3.  1    |    responsibilities. This contributes to social isolation and further impacts
285   II,     9.  3.  1    |            negative cultural, religious, social and legal connotations,
286   II,     9.  3.  1    |              females. For biological and social reasons, women are more
287   II,     9.  3.  1    |                 is the unequal economic, social and cultural status of women
288   II,     9.  3.  1    |          socio-economically. Their lower social position in many societies
289   II,     9.  3.  1    |                 of past sexual function, social class, educational level,
290   II,     9.  3.  1    |        objectively demonstrable and is a social or hygienic problem. The
291   II,     9.  3.  1    |                 older population creates social and economic dysfunctions
292   II,     9.  3.  1    |               actually need less energy. Social and economic pressures can
293   II,     9.  3.  1    |             video-simulation experiment. Social Science & Medicine 62 103–
294   II,     9.  3.  1    |              Mental HealthGender Bias, Social Position, and Depression’,
295   II,     9.  3.  1    |            combating the adverse health, social and economic consequences
296   II,     9.  3.  1    |          Publications of the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, Finland,
297   II,     9.  3.  1    |                 in focus, Population And Social Conditions 10/2006~ ~Plümper
298   II,     9.  3.  2    |              infant mortality: trends by social class, registration status,
299   II,     9.  3.  3    |                  secular and non-secular social forces. Recent decades have
300   II,     9.  3.  3    |          internet, have had a bearing on social norms, transporting sexual
301   II,     9.  3.  3    |                are especially prone to a social desirability bias – the
302   II,     9.  3.  3    |                  to respond according to social expectations of what is
303   II,     9.  3.  3    |                 be challenged by several social, cultural and economic factors.
304   II,     9.  3.  3    |          relationship, being in a higher social class, having a higher level
305   II,     9.  3.  3    |             activity. Techniques used in social marketing, which target
306   II,     9.  3.  3    |               information gained through social networks is more salient,
307   II,     9.  3.  3    |               demands the involvement of social as well as health sectors,
308   II,     9.  3.  3    |               agencies, as well as other social interventions. A way of
309   II,     9.  3.  3    |            reflect fundamental cultural, social, religious and educational
310   II,     9.  3.  3    |               Grier S, Bryant CA (2005): Social marketing in public health.
311   II,     9.  4.  1    |            Ageing is one of the greatest social, economic and health challenges
312   II,     9.  4.  1    |             mid-life experience, such as social class, gender and ethnicity,
313   II,     9.  4.  1    |                environmental and general social policy to ensure that an
314   II,     9.  4.  1    |           individual needs, preferences, social and cultural circumstances
315   II,     9.  4.  2    |                  their prevalence. Large social inequalities for some specific
316   II,     9.  4.  3    |             health and wellbeing such as social relationships, poverty and
317   II,     9.  4.  3    |              medical training, increased social awareness and better access
318   II,     9.  4.  4    |                 countries (WHO, 1999).~ ~Social factors. Social factors,
319   II,     9.  4.  4    |                 1999).~ ~Social factors. Social factors, which the individual
320   II,     9.  4.  5    |                 Healthy Ageing, 2007).~ ~Social capital. The aim of health
321   II,     9.  4.  5    |                 increase educational and social activity group interventions
322   II,     9.  4.  5    |               help to combat feelings of social isolation amongst older
323   II,     9.  4.  5    |             formal care, i.e. medical or social services. Only one-third
324   II,     9.  4.  5    |                  world are mainly women. Social isolation due to widowhood
325   II,     9.  4.  5    |                  whole, can help improve social networks and reduce social
326   II,     9.  4.  5    |               social networks and reduce social isolation at community level.
327   II,     9.  4.  5    |                    Care for the elderly. Social protection systems not only
328   II,     9.  4.  5    |                 Strategy for Modernising Social Protectionconsequently
329   II,     9.  4.  5    |                2000, which stressed that social protection systems need
330   II,     9.  4.  5    |                  maintain high levels of social protection in this field.
331   II,     9.  4.  5    |               employment. The health and social services sector is already
332   II,     9.  4.  5    |                 life. In some societies, social norms of widowhood impose
333   II,     9.  4.  5    |                 those in more privileged social groups. Further research
334   II,     9.  4.  5    |                and by subsequent income, social roles and expectations during
335   II,     9.  4.  5    |                  voluntary tool to other social and health topics, such
336   II,     9.  4.  5    |                into competing health and social care organisations is one
337   II,     9.  4.  5    |                providing both health and social care - is definitely one
338   II,     9.  4.  5    |                  insights for health and social care agencies grappling
339   II,     9.  4.  6    |               impact of chronic illness, social supports etc..)~· Plan integrated
340   II,     9.  4.  6    |            sectors (health, environment, social, financial etc…) for the
341   II,     9.  4.  7    |                  Integrated Health and~ ~Social Care for Older People: A
342   II,     9.  4.  7    |                 in focus: Population and Social Conditions. 10/2006~ ~Gray
343   II,     9.  4.  8    |          Providing Integrated Health and Social Care for Older Persons~SENECA~
344   II,     9.  5.  1    |                    Genderrefers to the social construction of what it
345   II,     9.  5.  1    |                 Interactions between the social environment, genes and biology
346   II,     9.  5.  1    |                  to gender inequality in social, educational, cultural and
347   II,     9.  5.  1    |              norms about risk-taking and social protection. The described
348   II,     9.  5.  1    |                and women.~ ~Loosening of social norms about women’s work
349   II,     9.  5.  2    |                 in the use of health and social care services;~- Provide
350   II,     9.  5.  3    |                  develop can put them at social disadvantage and thereby
351   II,     9.  5.  3    |                 they may come under more social pressure to indulge in risk
352   II,     9.  5.  3    |               will influence the income, social role, expectations and the
353   II,     9.  5.  3    |                relationship and in every social milieu. Estimates on violence
354   II,     9.  5.  3    |               the effects of alcohol and social norms regarding drunken
355   II,     9.  5.  3    |                this may be influenced by social experience and available
356   II,     9.  5.  3    |               cigarettes. They have less social support to stop smoking,
357   II,     9.  5.  3    |                   but this may be due to social experience and available
358   II,     9.  5.  3    |               actually need less energy. Social and economic pressures can
359   II,     9.  5.  3    |              suggests that the immediate social environment of children
360   II,     9.  5.  3    |  physical activity habits. The impact of social modelling appears to be
361   II,     9.  5.  4    |               health and long term care, social inclusion and pensions~·
362   II,     9.  5.  4    |             programme for employment and social solidarity PROGRESS.~ Reference
363   II,     9.  5.  4    |                  2005 : 10/08/2006~· The social situation in the European
364   II,     9.  5.  4    |               A6-0046/2005 :10/08/2006Social Policy Agenda for the period
365   II,     9.  5.  4    |               role of women in Turkey in social, economic and political
366   II,     9.  5.  4    |                recognizes the health and social consequences associated
367   II,     9.  5.  4    |                 of the importance of the social construction in gender indicators;~·
368   II,     9.  5.  5    |          explicitly integrated into all “social” and “economicdevelopment
369   II,     9.  5.  5    |                 of European populations. Social and economic inclusion of
370   II,     9.  5.  6    |             Mental Health: ‘Gender Bias, Social Position, and Depression’.
371   II,     9.  5.  6    |            combating the adverse health, social and economic consequences
372   II,     9.  5.  6    |          discrimination? (English title) Social Science & Medicine, 2005 (
373   II,     9.  5.  6    |            country, no circumstances, no social class: Domestic violence.
374   II,     9.  5.  6    |               Paper Series. Luxembourg~ ~Social Issues Research Centre (
375   II,     9.  5.  6    |               Research Centre (Undated): Social and cultural aspects of
376  III,    10.  1        |                as coping skills, and the social, cultural, occupational,
377  III,    10.  1        |           psychological / emotional, and social (public or private) interchanges
378  III,    10.  1        |           individual characteristics and social factors influencing health~ ~
379  III,    10.  1        |           indicators~ ~ ~Transport~ ~ ~ ~Social networks and social environment~ ~ ~ ~
380  III,    10.  1        |                      Social networks and social environment~ ~ ~ ~Socio-economic
381  III,    10.  1        |                 3) the conditions of the social environment, where the individual
382  III,    10.  1.  1    |               influenced by cultural and social reinforcing factors (e.g.
383  III,    10.  1.  1    |                 e.g. peer acceptance and social disapproval). Enabling factors,
384  III,    10.  1.  1    |                attitudes and influences, social support for non-smoking,
385  III,    10.  1.  1    |             opinion towards smoking, and social norms (e.g. smoking during
386  III,    10.  1.  1    |                  smoking after delivery, social disapproval). Tobacco use
387  III,    10.  1.  1    |                 Green and Potvin, 2004). Social and environmental factors
388  III,    10.  1.  1    |               The family environment and social norms may not be supportive
389  III,    10.  1.  1    |        individual knowledge and beliefs, social circumstances critically
390  III,    10.  1.  1    |              determinants: drinking is a social act in many cultures (Rehm
391  III,    10.  1.  1    |                 for alcohol consumption; social networks influence individual
392  III,    10.  1.  1    |                 and lifestyle attitudes. Social connectedness as well as
393  III,    10.  1.  1    |                 connectedness as well as social isolation (e.g. after migration
394  III,    10.  1.  1    |                   core relationships and social networks / peers may reinforce
395  III,    10.  1.  1    |               alcohol consumption, heavy social drinking, psychological
396  III,    10.  1.  1    |             children possibly leading to social, psychological and somatic
397  III,    10.  1.  1    |               causal relationship. Other social, personality and genetic
398  III,    10.  1.  1    |            disruption, failure to fulfil social roles, concern about drinking,
399  III,    10.  1.  1    |                of psychiatric disorders (social phobia, social anxiety)
400  III,    10.  1.  1    |                disorders (social phobia, social anxiety) and suicidal behaviour (
401  III,    10.  1.  1    |          competence. The latter includes social influence, sociability,
402  III,    10.  1.  1    |                barriers originating from social networks to the development
403  III,    10.  1.  1    |              consumption in British men. Social relationships within the
404  III,    10.  1.  1    |                 be challenged by several social, cultural and economic factors.
405  III,    10.  1.  3    |                  HR, Lauerman RJ (1987): Social drinking as a health and
406  III,    10.  1.  3    |                  RS, Stephens RS (1999): Social anxiety and drinking in
407  III,    10.  1.  3    |          drinking in college students: a social cognitive theory analysis.
408  III,    10.  1.  3    |         Education, health promotion, and social and lifestyle determinants
409  III,    10.  1.  3    |      Determinants of health and disease: Social, economic, and cultural
410  III,    10.  1.  3    |               diagnosis and treatment of social phobia and alcohol abuse.
411  III,    10.  1.  3    |              drinking patterns and their social and health consequences.
412  III,    10.  2.  1    |                Panel~ECOSOC~Economic and Social Council~EHIS~European Health
413  III,    10.  2.  1    |         north-south pattern, with strong social gradients in northern European
414  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 tobacco epidemic stages.~Social gradients in smoking prevalence
415  III,    10.  2.  1    |               taxes and contributions to social security among smokers,
416  III,    10.  2.  1    |               budgetary costs related to social services). A more comprehensive
417  III,    10.  2.  1    |            comprehensive estimate of net social costs for Australia ranges
418  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  the devastating health, social, environmental and economic
419  III,    10.  2.  1    |               solutions to international social and health problems falls
420  III,    10.  2.  1    |                remit of the Economic and Social Council (ECO ). Their Reso 62
421  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 contribution to reducing social inequalities in health in
422  III,    10.  2.  1    |                the cost: Estimate of the social costs of drug abuse in Australia
423  III,    10.  2.  1    |                includes those health and social problems that occur to the
424  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 as culture, gender, age, social class, criminal status,
425  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   This harm also has its social cost, which has been estimated
426  III,    10.  2.  1    |                minimizing the health and social harms that result from alcohol
427  III,    10.  2.  1    |           interests of public health and social well-being through their
428  III,    10.  2.  1    |               their impact on health and social determinants, such as drinking
429  III,    10.  2.  1    |                the form of marketing and social norms supporting drinking,
430  III,    10.  2.  1    |            Analysis of 1.1 Million Men." Social Science and Medicine, 58:
431  III,    10.  2.  1    |                use of illicit drugs. The social situation of long term problem
432  III,    10.  2.  1    |                implemented with focus on social influence through standardised
433  III,    10.  2.  1    |            treatment and detoxification. Social reintegration programs,
434  III,    10.  2.  1    |               home, and to develop their social skills, are another important
435  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   prevention, treatment, social rehabilitation, harm reduction)
436  III,    10.  2.  1    |              HIV/AIDS, as well as a poor social situation. Many health services
437  III,    10.  2.  1    |               major health, economic and social effects on all communities
438  III,    10.  2.  1    |              affects quality of life and social functioning, especially
439  III,    10.  2.  1    |             supplies regardless of their social or economic status. Salt
440  III,    10.  2.  1    |             programmes (Petersen, 2003). Social, economic and cultural factors
441  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  tackling the underlying social, political and environmental
442  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  other psychological and social benefits that affect health (
443  III,    10.  2.  1    |               example, it can help build social skills in children (Evans
444  III,    10.  2.  1    |             participation itself and the social and cultural benefits of
445  III,    10.  2.  1    |               and Sport (TNS Opinion and Social, 2004). The survey covered
446  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 sport activities and the social dimension of sport. One
447  III,    10.  2.  1    |                and Food (TNS Opinion and Social, 2006). This survey contained
448  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  and language barriers), social factors (such as encouragement
449  III,    10.  2.  1    |                of conducive physical and social environments. The White
450  III,    10.  2.  1    |            Economics of the Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine
451  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 Child-friendly? Canadian Social Trends, 2002:25.~ ~Pratt
452  III,    10.  2.  1    |               123-155.~ ~TNS Opinion and Social (2004): Special Eurobarometer
453  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 2007).~ ~TNS Opinion and Social (2006): Special Eurobarometer
454  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  socioeconomic status.~ ~Social inequality may directly
455  III,    10.  2.  1    |            points to the same problem of social disadvantage affecting the
456  III,    10.  2.  1    |              which deals with the larger social determinants of obesity
457  III,    10.  2.  1    |              team (2003): Coexistence of social inequalities in undernutrition
458  III,    10.  2.  1    |              London, National Centre for Social Research, Department of
459  III,    10.  2.  1    |              Kunst AE (1994): Health and social inequality in Europe. Classification
460  III,    10.  2.  1    |               Power C (1994): Health and social inequality in Europe. British
461  III,    10.  2.  4    |             economic, ethical, legal and social implications is presently
462  III,    10.  2.  4    |                   besides environmental, social and life style factors,
463  III,    10.  2.  4    |                health determinants (e.g. social, behavioural, environmental,
464  III,    10.  2.  4    |             economic, ethical, legal and social implications is presently
465  III,    10.  2.  4    |                  of genomics for health, social, and environmental policy
466  III,    10.  2.  4    |                  diverse sources such as social epidemiology, systems biology,
467  III,    10.  2.  5    |              associated with the child's social functioning and adaptation
468  III,    10.  2.  5    |         developmental experiences affect social processes, associated physiological
469  III,    10.  2.  5    |           pressure responses to everyday social interactions. Psychosom
470  III,    10.  3.  1    |         annoyance, are interference with social behaviour and speech communication,
471  III,    10.  3.  1    |              countries estimate that the social cost of road noise pollution
472  III,    10.  3.  1    |                  a strict scientific and social cost-benefit analysis.~ ~
473  III,    10.  3.  1    |              noise annoyance by means of social and socio-acoustic surveys (
474  III,    10.  3.  4    |          economic development as well as social and political stability.~ ~
475  III,    10.  3.  4    |           Age-associated factors such as social isolation are very important,
476  III,    10.  3.  4    |                of elderly people and the social and health care aspects
477  III,    10.  4.  5    |              marine-related economic and social activities depend.~ ~References~
478  III,    10.  5.  1    |                 environmental as well as social determinants, the information
479  III,    10.  5.  1    |                  next (WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health,
480  III,    10.  5.  1    |                  leisure, recreation and social activities is as important
481  III,    10.  5.  1    |              have been identified as (a) social bonding between residents,
482  III,    10.  5.  1    |                 identity and building up social capital and trust, and (
483  III,    10.  5.  1    |               places and green areas for social and recreational activities.
484  III,    10.  5.  1    |        especially the impact of specific social circumstances. The example
485  III,    10.  5.  1    |                analyse data by income or social group we do not get an adequate
486  III,    10.  5.  1    |               topics such as Demography, Social Aspects, Economic Aspects,
487  III,    10.  5.  1    |               and injuries, and mitigate social and health inequities within
488  III,    10.  5.  1    |                 role of the physical and social environment. In: Berkman,
489  III,    10.  5.  1    |                L.F., Kawachi, I. (eds.): Social Epidemiology. (Oxford University
490  III,    10.  5.  1    |                 Aug.~ ~WHO Commission on Social Determinants of Health (
491  III,    10.  5.  1    |            health, our future: Acting on social determinants for health
492  III,    10.  5.  2    |               noticed for what concerned social issues, family planning
493  III,    10.  5.  2    |               worse in urban areas, with social pathologies such as alcohol
494  III,    10.  5.  2    |            higher stress and less stable social conditions in urban areas
495  III,    10.  5.  3    |          policy-making on employment and social affairs and is striving
496  III,    10.  5.  3    |             safety as well as addressing social determinants and employability~ ~
497  III,    10.  5.  3    |                those engaged in health & social work.~ ~Table 10.5.3.1.
498  III,    10.  5.  3    |                those engaged in health & social work report more often headache
499  III,    10.  5.  3    |                in focusPopulation and social conditions13/2006~ ~Current
500  III,    10.  5.  3    |             safety as well as addressing social determinants and employability.~ ~