1-500 | 501-646
    Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  1        |                     current output of about 7% of GDP in the EU15, larger
  2    I,     2.  5        |                   in the last years down to 7%, the lowest level ever
  3    I,     2.  6        |                     2003 respectively to 71.7 millions in 2050. For all
  4    I,     2.  7        |                                           2.7. Urbanisation~In 2008, for
  5    I,     2.  9        |                  with a global average of 1.7 mm/year in the 20th century).
  6    I,     2. 10.  4    |                  were reduced by 67% from 2.7% to 0.9% of prescriptions12.~ ~
  7    I,     2. 10.  4    |             Internet pharmacies. In 2006, 2.7 million items were seized
  8    I,     2. 11        |                    Health Perspectives, 113(7), 823-839.~Rantanen J (1998):
  9    I,     3.  2        |                    percentage diminished to 7 percent, i.e. it nearly
 10    I,     3.  2        |                Germany stands out with over 7 million immigrants (9% of
 11    I,     3.  2        |                  also France (11%), the UK (7%), Poland ( 5%), Italy (
 12    I,     3.  2        |               million immigrants, i.e. over 7% of their population. Luxembourg
 13   II,     4.  1        |                   elsewhere in the EU (6 to 7 years). For the future,
 14   II,     4.  1        |                   76.5 years to 84.0 years (7.5 years gap) for women.
 15   II,     4.  1        |                     years to 24.1 years (13.7 years gap) for women, highlighting
 16   II,     4.  1        |                   13 years for men and over 7 years for women. Gaps in
 17   II,     4.  1        |                   14.5 years for men and 13.7 years for women, highlighting
 18   II,     4.  1        |                     LE does. Thus Table 4.1.7 presents the values of life
 19   II,     4.  1        |                     5.2 years in the USA to 7 years in Japan. Finally,
 20   II,     4.  2        |                    observed in the 1990s (2.7 years).~ ~Table 4.2.1 shows
 21   II,     4.  2        |             circulatory diseases (causes 6, 7 and 8 in table 3) has contributed
 22   II,     4.  2        |                 table shows that for men in 7 out of the 13 selected countries
 23   II,     4.  2        |                effect was still negative in 7 out of the 13 countries.
 24   II,     4.  2        |                 that for women.~ ~Table 4.2.7 shows the development of
 25   II,     4.  2        |                  men and women.~ ~Table 4.2.7. Average annual change in
 26   II,     5.  2.  3    |                      the rates vary from 42.7 deaths per 100.000 in France
 27   II,     5.  2.  4    |              examination surveys. Table 5.2.7 (htt b, 2007) provides the
 28   II,     5.  2.  4    |                     5.2 mmol/l, 6.2, 6.5 or 7.8) and difficulties in the
 29   II,     5.  2.  4    |                     Chapter 8).~ ~Table 5.2.7. Estimated prevalence of
 30   II,     5.  2.  6    |              references can be found in 5.2.7)~Baigent C, Keech A, Kearney
 31   II,     5.  2.  7    |                                         5.2.7. References~Allender S,
 32   II,     5.  3.  5    |                mortality rates (Figures 5.3.7) were estimated in Lithuania
 33   II,     5.  3.  5    |               Figures 5.3.5 and Figures 5.3.7). Stomach cancer incidence (
 34   II,     5.  3.  6    |                entire Europe increased from 7.5% in men diagnosed in 1983–
 35   II,     5.  3.  8    |                                         5.3.7 Future developments~ ~In
 36   II,     5.  3.  9    |                 third version. Ann Oncol 14(7):973-1005.~ ~Coleman MP,
 37   II,     5.  4.  1    |                     a fasting plasma sample 7.0 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) and /
 38   II,     5.  4.  1    |                 projection of 380 millions (7.3%) forecast for 2025. According
 39   II,     5.  4.  1    |                   European Region is around 7.8% (about 48 million people),
 40   II,     5.  4.  1    |                     worldwide prevalence of 7.5%, estimated to increase
 41   II,     5.  4.  2    |                                       5.4.2.7. Insurance/reimbursement
 42   II,     5.  4.  2    |                    HbA1c tested, with HbA1c>7.5%~14~Percent of diabetic
 43   II,     5.  4.  2    |                  above 6.1 mmol/l and below 7.0 mmol/l (fasting plasma
 44   II,     5.  4.  2    |                     glucose 6,1 mmol/l and <7,0 mmol/l).~Measurement of
 45   II,     5.  4.  2    |               reported here.~Level of HbA1c>7.0% is an indicator of poor
 46   II,     5.  4.  2    |                  and a value of HbA1c above 7.0%. This indicator is also
 47   II,     5.  4.  3    |                    In 2006, approximately 8.7% of the adult (20-79 years)
 48   II,     5.  4.  3    |                    mortality ranges between 7 (Luxembourg) and 199 (Portugal)
 49   II,     5.  4.  3    |                      2006) show results for 7 EU countries ranging between
 50   II,     5.  4.  3    |                    Finland).~Level of HbA1c>7.0%. According to EUCID crude
 51   II,     5.  4.  3    |                      OECD collected data on 7 EU countries, with retinal
 52   II,     5.  4.  3    |                    and Scotland. A total of 7 countries reported values
 53   II,     5.  4.  4    |                median=3%) and IDF (median=8.7%) data is difficult to explain.
 54   II,     5.  4.  7    |                                         5.4.7. Future developments~It
 55   II,     5.  4.  8    |                      Diabetologia, 2002; 45(7): S5-12.~ ~Jonsson PM (2000),
 56   II,     5.  4.  8    |                Group Epidemiology.;4(5):421-7~Pruna S, Stanciu E, Macarie
 57   II,     5.  4.  8    |                 Technol Inform. 2002;90:282-7.~Smi P (2007): Economics
 58   II,     5.  5.Int    |              problems account for more than 7% of all estimated ill-health
 59   II,     5.  5.Int    |               subjects range from 0.1% to 5.7%, whilst for bulimia it
 60   II,     5.  5.Int    |              bulimia it ranges from 0.3% to 7.3% in women and from 0.1%
 61   II,     5.  5.Int    |                     1% equivalent to some 3.7 million people. The disease
 62   II,     5.  5.  1    |                     is given in Table 5.5.1.7.~ ~Table 5.5.1.7. Age adjusted
 63   II,     5.  5.  1    |                Table 5.5.1.7.~ ~Table 5.5.1.7. Age adjusted mortality
 64   II,     5.  5.  2    |                                       5.5.2.7. References~ ~Alzheimer
 65   II,     5.  5.  3    |                                     5.5.3.1.7. References~Alexander D,
 66   II,     5.  5.  3    |                    and lifetime morbid risk 7.2 per 1000, respectively.
 67   II,     5.  5.  3    |                   WHO Mental Health Report, 7 per 1000 suffer from schizophrenia
 68   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     lifetime prevalence and 7.2 for lifetime morbidity
 69   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     1st and accounts for 13.7% of YLDs, followed by alcohol
 70   II,     5.  5.  3    |                    the WHO European Region (7 per 1000) affected by schizophrenia
 71   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  the disease burden, only 5.7% of the budget is allocated
 72   II,     5.  5.  3    |              Andlin-Sobocki (Figure 5.5.3.3.7), it can be assumed that
 73   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 drug costs represented only 7% of the direct costs. Indirect
 74   II,     5.  5.  3    |                   to F20-F29~Figure 5.5.3.2.7. Direct healthcare costs
 75   II,     5.  5.  3    |                    Options” (2005) mentions 7 groups of disorders for
 76   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     W Public Health Bull 13(7):155-8.~Andlin-Sobocki P, &
 77   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  Gen Intern Med 21(11):1133-7.~Coodin S (2001): Body mass
 78   II,     5.  5.  3    |                   Wien Klin Wochenschr 118 (7-8):196-206.~European Commission (
 79   II,     5.  5.  3    |                   World Psychiatry 4(3):161-7.~Knapp M, McDaid D, Mossialos
 80   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     Br J Psychiatry 153:214-7.~Spollen JJ (2003): The
 81   II,     5.  5.  3    |                                     5.5.3.2.7. Acronyms~ ~DALYs~Disability
 82   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 sometime between ages 3 and 7. They often have good language
 83   II,     5.  5.  3    |                average finding of 6.6 and 6.7 per 1,000 eight-year-olds
 84   II,     5.  5.  3    |                children with autism cost £2.7 billion (Euros 3.8 billion)
 85   II,     5.  5.  3    |                                     5.5.3.3.7. Acronyms~ ~ASD~Autism Spectrum
 86   II,     5.  5.  3    |                features) occurred in 15% (8.7 per 100,000 per year), cryptogenic
 87   II,     5.  5.  3    |                    epilepsies (idiopathic 1.7; symptomatic 13.6), 6.7
 88   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     7; symptomatic 13.6), 6.7 per 100,000 for generalized
 89   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 epilepsy ranges from 3.2 to 7.8 per 1,000 (Table 5.5.3.
 90   II,     5.  5.  3    |                    All ages ~MR review~333 ~7.6 ~Joensen, 1986 (*)~Estonia ~
 91   II,     5.  5.  3    |                    Door-to-door survey ~43 ~7.7 ~de la Court et al., 1996 (*)~
 92   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  Door-to-door survey ~43 ~7.7 ~de la Court et al., 1996 (*)~
 93   II,     5.  5.  3    |           community-based studies and 1.9-8.7 in institutionalised populations (
 94   II,     5.  5.  3    |                    MF~Incident cohort~39~15.7~2.5~Lindsten et al., 2000~ ~
 95   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  Cross-sectional~105~12.0~8.7~Alstrom, 1942 (*)~ ~NC/EC~
 96   II,     5.  5.  3    |               mortality, with a SMR between 7 and 50 (Forsgren, 2004).
 97   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     of death (95% CI 3.8-22.7) compared with patients
 98   II,     5.  5.  3    |                   causes) was 4.9 (95% CI 2.7-8.3) vs. 7.9 (95% CI 2.6-
 99   II,     5.  5.  3    |                    4.9 (95% CI 2.7-8.3) vs. 7.9 (95% CI 2.6-18.4) in non-surgical
100   II,     5.  5.  3    |                                     5.5.3.4.7. Acronyms~ ~AED~Antiepileptic
101   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     4.0 to 6.5) and severe (7.0 to 9.5).~Based on the
102   II,     5.  5.  3    |            Netherlands) for severe MS (EDSS 7-9.5)~ ~Table 5.5.3.5.6.
103   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 Europe is reported in Table 7 Decreasing trends over time
104   II,     5.  5.  3    |                   30 to 45.~ ~Table 5.5.3.5.7. Mortality (per 100 000)
105   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     services only represent 7% of total cost, explaining
106   II,     5.  5.  3    |             assistance needed to walk 20 m; 7.0 to 9.5 refers to patients
107   II,     5.  5.  3    |                                     5.5.3.5.7. References~ ~Bajenaru O,
108   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  multiple sclerosis. Lancet 7;268-277.~Ekestern E, Lebhart
109   II,     5.  5.  3    |          population-based study. Mult Scler 7:111-117.~McGuigan C, McCarthy
110   II,     5.  5.  3    |                    4.9/100.000, PSP: 2.5 to 7.5/100.000; CGD: 4.0/100.
111   II,     5.  5.  3    |                  due to PD resulting in €10.7 billion per year in Europe (
112   II,     5.  5.  3    |                average cost per patient of €7,600.~ ~Figure 5.5.3.6.2.
113   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     PD was estimated at €10.7 billion in 2004 in EU25
114   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     by 2030 to results in 8.7 to 9.3 million (Dorsey et
115   II,     5.  5.  3    |                                     5.5.3.6.7. References~Aarsland D,
116   II,     5.  5.  3    |             individual. J Am Geriatr Soc 45(7):844-849.~ ~
117   II,     5.  6.  3    |                  was estimated to incur SEK 7.4 billion (Euro 690 million)
118   II,     5.  6.  3    |                  remission rates are only 5-7% with a median duration
119   II,     5.  6.  3    |                     the ratio varied from 1.7 to 4.0) .~ ~The incidence
120   II,     5.  6.  3    |                     considerable (Table 5.6.7).~ ~Table 5.6.7. Estimated
121   II,     5.  6.  3    |                   Table 5.6.7).~ ~Table 5.6.7. Estimated lifetime risks
122   II,     5.  6.  4    |            musculoskeletal conditions was 0.7% of the gross national product.~ ~
123   II,     5.  7        |                                           5.7. Chronic kidney disease
124   II,     5.  7.  1    |                                           5.7.1. Introduction~ ~Chronic
125   II,     5.  7.  1    |                population level.~ ~Figure 5.7.1. Development and progression
126   II,     5.  7.  1    |                 KDIGO) initiative (Tables 5.7.1 and 5.7.2). Data about
127   II,     5.  7.  1    |              initiative (Tables 5.7.1 and 5.7.2). Data about CKD in children
128   II,     5.  7.  1    |                     GFR cut-offs.~ ~Table 5.7.1. KDIGO Definition of Chronic
129   II,     5.  7.  1    |               kidney damage~ ~ ~ ~ ~Table 5.7.2. Current CKD Classification
130   II,     5.  7.  2    |                                           5.7.2. Data sources~ ~ ~The
131   II,     5.  7.  3    |                                           5.7.3. Data description and
132   II,     5.  7.  3    |                    corresponding figure was 7.7 cases /year pmarp (<30
133   II,     5.  7.  3    |                  corresponding figure was 7.7 cases /year pmarp (<30 ml/
134   II,     5.  7.  3    |                   in children aged 0-14 was 7.1 patients pmarp (Table
135   II,     5.  7.  3    |                     patients pmarp (Table 5.7.3).~ ~Adults~ ~CKD incidence
136   II,     5.  7.  3    |               incidence rate of 3-5 CKD was 7.8 per 1000 patients x years (
137   II,     5.  7.  3    |                    pmp in Portugal (Table 5.7.4 and Table 5.7.5). Just
138   II,     5.  7.  3    |                     Table 5.7.4 and Table 5.7.5). Just like prevalence,
139   II,     5.  7.  3    |                    than in females (Table 5.7.3). Whereas incidence rates
140   II,     5.  7.  3    |                    diabetic ESRD.~ ~Table 5.7.3. Incidence of RRT over
141   II,     5.  7.  3    |                    renal failure.~ ~Table 5.7.4. Incidence of RRT over
142   II,     5.  7.  3    |                period per country~ ~Table 5.7.5. Incidence of RRT over
143   II,     5.  7.  3    |                   by more than 50% (Table 5.7.3). This was primarily due
144   II,     5.  7.  3    |         disproportionally affected (Table 5.7.7), may depend on the fact
145   II,     5.  7.  3    |       disproportionally affected (Table 5.7.7), may depend on the fact
146   II,     5.  7.  3    |                   ml/min per 1.74 m2) of 74.7 cases pmarp (Ardissino et
147   II,     5.  7.  3    |                 related population (Table 5.7.7).~ ~Adults~ ~The prevalence
148   II,     5.  7.  3    |               related population (Table 5.7.7).~ ~Adults~ ~The prevalence
149   II,     5.  7.  3    |                      as defined in Tables 5.7..1 and 5.7..2) in The Netherlands (
150   II,     5.  7.  3    |              defined in Tables 5.7..1 and 5.7..2) in The Netherlands (
151   II,     5.  7.  3    |                  2007) is shown in Figure 5.7.2.~ ~Figure 5.7.2. Prevalence
152   II,     5.  7.  3    |                    Figure 5.7.2.~ ~Figure 5.7.2. Prevalence of chronic
153   II,     5.  7.  3    |                      Hallan et al, 2006) to 7.2% (Germany) (Meisinger
154   II,     5.  7.  3    |                  2005) in females (Figure 5.7.3), while higher figures
155   II,     5.  7.  3    |                increased with age (Figure 5.7.4).~ ~Figure 5.7.3. Prevalence
156   II,     5.  7.  3    |                   Figure 5.7.4).~ ~Figure 5.7.3. Prevalence of stages
157   II,     5.  7.  3    |              EUGLOREH countries.~ ~Figure 5.7.4. Sex and age specific
158   II,     5.  7.  3    |                    pmp in Germany (Tables 5.7.6 A and B). It increased
159   II,     5.  7.  3    |                compared to females (Table 5.7.7). Prevalence of RRT in
160   II,     5.  7.  3    |              compared to females (Table 5.7.7). Prevalence of RRT in Europeans
161   II,     5.  7.  3    |                     USRDS ,2007).~ ~Table 5.7.6A. Prevalence of RRT over
162   II,     5.  7.  3    |                  2005 by country.~ ~Table 5.7.6B. Prevalence of RRT over
163   II,     5.  7.  3    |                  2005 by country.~ ~Table 5.7.7. Prevalence of RRT over
164   II,     5.  7.  3    |                     by country.~ ~Table 5.7.7. Prevalence of RRT over
165   II,     5.  7.  3    |                   period 1992-2005 (Table 5.7.7) the overall adjusted
166   II,     5.  7.  3    |                 period 1992-2005 (Table 5.7.7) the overall adjusted prevalence
167   II,     5.  7.  3    |                   age respectively (Table 5.7.8). Five-year mortality
168   II,     5.  7.  3    |                     et al, 2000).~ ~Table 5.7.8. 90-day, one-, two- and
169   II,     5.  7.  3    |         disproportionally affected (Table 5.7.7), may depend on the fact
170   II,     5.  7.  3    |       disproportionally affected (Table 5.7.7), may depend on the fact
171   II,     5.  7.  4    |                                           5.7.4. Risk factors~ ~Hypertension
172   II,     5.  7.  5    |                                           5.7.5. Control tools and policies~ ~
173   II,     5.  7.  6    |                                           5.7.6. Future developments~ ~
174   II,     5.  7.  7    |                                           5.7.7. References~American Diabetes
175   II,     5.  7.  7    |                                         5.7.7. References~American Diabetes
176   II,     5.  7.  7    |                    J Am Soc Nephrol 2003;14(7 Suppl 2):S131-S138.~Chen
177   II,     5.  7.  7    |                     Blood Pressure: the JNC 7 report. JAMA 19):2560-72.~
178   II,     5.  7.  7    |                     Soc Nephrol 2005 Jul;16(7):2134-40.~Levey AS, Bosch
179   II,     5.  7.  7    |                    Transplant 2001;16 Suppl 7:57-60~Lin J, Knight EL,
180   II,     5.  7.  7    |                 Dial Transplant 2006 Jul;21(7):1899-905.~Meisinger C,
181   II,     5.  7.  7    |                  Gen Intern Med 2007 Jul;22(7):1018-23.~Smith DH, Gullion
182   II,     5.  7.  7    |                     Soc Nephrol 2006 Jul;17(7):2034-47.~ ~
183   II,     5.  8.  3    |             individuals was considered: the 7-year cumulative incidence
184   II,     5.  8.  3    |               IBERPOC study, carried out in 7 geographical areas with
185   II,     5.  8.  3    |              respectively to: mild 12.3 and 7.3%, moderate 4.5 and 2.2%,
186   II,     5.  8.  3    |                    stage II or higher at 10.7%. A doctor diagnosis of
187   II,     5.  8.  3    |                     moderate 5.3%, severe 0.7%, and very severe 0.1%) (
188   II,     5.  8.  3    |                  mild, 13.3 for moderate, 3.7 for severe and 0.6 for very
189   II,     5.  8.  3    |                   RI (RR = 2.2), MI (RR = 1.7), angina (RR = 1.7), fractures (
190   II,     5.  8.  3    |                   RR = 1.7), angina (RR = 1.7), fractures (RR = 1.6),
191   II,     5.  8.  3    |                  and rehabilitation) was 38.7 billion Euro, of which 4.
192   II,     5.  8.  3    |                    billion Euro, of which 4.7 were for ambulatory care,
193   II,     5.  8.  3    |                 were for ambulatory care, 2.7 for drugs, 2.9 for inpatient
194   II,     5.  8.  5    |                  sign were present (mild in 7.6%, moderate in 6.7% and
195   II,     5.  8.  5    |                 mild in 7.6%, moderate in 6.7% and severe in 5.9%). AL
196   II,     5.  8.  6    |               long-term home care (26% vs 9.7%, p<0.05), but were much
197   II,     5.  8.  7    |                                         5.8.7. References~ ~ ~American
198   II,     5.  8.  7    |                  France. Value Health 2004; 7: 168-174.~ ~European Respiratory
199   II,     5.  8.  7    |              co-morbidity. Respir Res 2006; 7: 109-116.~ ~Halbert RJ,
200   II,     5.  9. FB    |                     teenagers ranges from 3.7% in Greece, to 16% in Finland
201   II,     5.  9. FB    |                    and asthma reports 2007, 7:385-389.~ ~Story RE (2007):
202   II,     5.  9.  2    | rhino-conjunctivitis and atopic eczema in 6-7 and 13-15 years old were
203   II,     5.  9.  2    |                     193 404 children aged 67 years from 66 centres in
204   II,     5.  9.  2    |                   2004 (tables 5.9.5 to 5.9.7). Twenty studies have been
205   II,     5.  9.  3    |                    an earlier age at onset (7.8 vs 15.9 years, P 001)
206   II,     5.  9.  3    |                centres, varying from from 3.7% in Greece to 32.2% in UK.
207   II,     5.  9.  3    |           prevalence of current asthma of 2.7% for the seven AIRE countries (
208   II,     5.  9.  3    |                  prevalence in children, 14.7% in adolescents, while in
209   II,     5.  9.  3    |                      11.2% in children of 6-7 years of age and 16.9% in
210   II,     5.  9.  3    |                     years of age), Romania (7%), Switzerland (9.1% in
211   II,     5.  9.  3    |                      more commonly in the 67 years of age-group than
212   II,     5.  9.  3    |                     of age-group: for the 67 years of age-group, two
213   II,     5.  9.  3    |                   for asthma amounts to €17.7 billion . As a chronic disease
214   II,     5.  9.  4    |                    median between centre 21.7%, 16.9% and 8.8%, respectively).
215   II,     5.  9.  4    |                     prevalence in males (35.7%) than in females (28.8%).
216   II,     5.  9.  4    |                  caused by grass pollen (12.7%), followed by house dust
217   II,     5.  9.  4    |                        silver birch pollen (7.9%) and cat epithelia (3.
218   II,     5.  9.  4    |                 lifetime asthma: 5.4% and 9.7% respectively, P <0.001;
219   II,     5.  9.  7    |                                         5.9.7. References~ ~Alfvén T (
220   II,     5.  9.  7    |                     Clin Exp Allergy 37:780-7.~ ~Bousquet PJ, Chinn S,
221   II,     5.  9.  7    |                 Survey. Eur Respir J, 1994, 7, 954-960~ ~Compalati E,
222   II,     5.  9.  7    |                Immunol. 2003 Feb;111(2):402-7.~ ~De Marco R (2002): Incidence
223   II,     5. 10.  2    |               experts participating in Task 7.2, 1998~ ~ ~Taking into
224   II,     5. 10.  3    |                    by apple and hazelnut (4.7%), strawberries (4.6%),
225   II,     5. 10.  7    |                                        5.10.7. References~ ~Asero R, Ballmer-Weber
226   II,     5. 10.  7    |                Scientific Cooperation. Task 7.2 entitled “The occurrence
227   II,     5. 10.  7    |            databases. Mol Nutr Food Res. 50(7):633-637):~ ~Gupta R, Sheikh
228   II,     5. 10.  7    |                  across Europe. Allergy 62 (7), 717–722.~ ~Rona R, Keil
229   II,     5. 10.  7    |                   Chem Toxicol. 2007 Jul;45(7):1116-22. Epub 2007 Jan
230   II,     5. 11.  3    |                  prevalence at 2 yrs of age=7%~Böhme M, et al~ ~Swedish
231   II,     5. 11.  3    |                      Lifetime prevalence=20.7%~Broberg A, et al~ ~Italian
232   II,     5. 11.  3    |                   21.3% 1-year prevalence=6.7% Point prevalence=3.6%~Mortz
233   II,     5. 11.  3    |                   Europe~Point prevalence=1.7%~Cumulative incidence=2.
234   II,     5. 11.  3    |           percentage positive for nickel (9.7%) were reported in the Danish
235   II,     5. 11.  3    |                  nickel and cobalt, whereas 7 (0.7%) had contact allergy
236   II,     5. 11.  3    |                    and cobalt, whereas 7 (0.7%) had contact allergy to
237   II,     5. 11.  3    |             decreased significantly from 36.7% to 25.8% among German women
238   II,     5. 11.  3    |                  Research, 1998;290(10):523-7~The ESSCA Writing Group.
239   II,     5. 11.  3    |                   warrant medical care with 7.3%, 3.4% 8.9% and 3.8% in
240   II,     5. 11.  3    |               enterprises (see also Chapter 7 on “Rare Diseases”).~ ~Skin
241   II,     5. 11.  3    |                     sites (84.2% BCC and 74.7% SCC) followed by the~trunk
242   II,     5. 11.  7    |                                        5.11.7. References~ ~Böhme M, Svensson
243   II,     5. 11.  7    |                   Derm Venereol 2001;81:193-7.~ ~Boyle P, Dorè JF, Autier
244   II,     5. 11.  7    |                    Venereol. 2005;19 (S1):1-7.~ ~Herd RM, Tidman MJ, Hunter
245   II,     5. 11.  7    |                     J Dermatol 1995;132:772-7.~ ~National Institute for
246   II,     5. 12.  3    |                   Europe, i.e. Portugal (38.7/100,000), Italy (35.0),
247   II,     5. 12.  3    |                     2000-2002, Finland from 7.4 to 13.6, Ireland from
248   II,     5. 12.  3    |                     6 to 8.9, Scotland from 7.8 to 20.3, Bulgaria from
249   II,     5. 12.  3    |                 rising, with an APC around +7% in men and +3% in women
250   II,     5. 12.  3    |                      around +9% in men and +7% in women from Scotland
251   II,     5. 12.  7    |                                        5.12.7. References~ ~Alter MJ,
252   II,     5. 13        |                  obesity accounts for up to 7% of health care costs and
253   II,     5. 13        |                dealt with in Chapter 10.2.1.7 in view of the close connection
254   II,     5. 13        |              references, see Chapter 10.2.1.7.~ ~ ~
255   II,     5. 14.  3    |                social interaction, while 18·7% worried a great deal about
256   II,     5. 14.  7    |                                        5.14.7. Future developments~ ~Access
257   II,     5. 14.  8    |             Bourgeois D.M., Llodra JC., pp. 7-17. Quintessence Publishing
258   II,     5. 15.  6    |                  Med. 2006 Feb 2;354(5):445-7.~Holzman NA (1978): Rare diseases,
259   II,     5. 15.  6    |                   37(1):46-9. Epub 2006 Jul 7.~McCabe C, Claxton K, Tsuchiya
260   II,     6.  3.  1    |                        increasing to around 7.2 billion € when the two
261   II,     6.  3.  1    |                  million, to rotavirus21.7 million and to salmonellosis €
262   II,     6.  3.  2    |                     an intensive care unit, 7.2% acquired pneumonia, and
263   II,     6.  3.  3    |                   have shown that between 1.7% and 17% of women with no
264   II,     6.  3.  3    |                   000), followed by Latvia (7.37 per 100 000). Incidence
265   II,     6.  3.  3    |                     increased steadily from 7.0 per 100 000 per year in
266   II,     6.  3.  3    |                    000 per year in 2001, to 7.9 per 100 000 per year in
267   II,     6.  3.  4    |                     male to female ratio, 1.7:1). Cases aged over 64 accounted
268   II,     6.  3.  6    |                  better reporting (Figure 6.7). The most affected age
269   II,     6.  3.  6    |                    tetracycline.~ ~Figure 6.7. Campylobacteriosis trends
270   II,     6.  3.  6    |                   2001. In 2005, a total of 7 425 human shigellosis cases
271   II,     6.  3.  7    |                                         6.3.7. Other diseases of zoonotic
272   II,     6.  3.  7    |                                         6.3.7.1. Summary~ ~This is a very
273   II,     6.  3.  7    |                                         6.3.7.2. Diseases present in Europe~ ~
274   II,     6.  3.  7    |                                         6.3.7.3. Mainly imported diseases~ ~
275   II,     7            |                                             7.~ACCIDENTS AND INJURIES
276   II,     7.  1        |                                             7.1. Introduction~ ~Injuries (
277   II,     7.  2        |                                             7.2. Data sources~ ~ ~Governments
278   II,     7.  2.  1    |                                             7.2.1. Data on causes of death (
279   II,     7.  2.  2    |                                             7.2.2. Data on Hospital discharges~ ~
280   II,     7.  2.  3    |                                             7.2.3. CARE (Community Road
281   II,     7.  2.  4    |                                             7.2.4. ESAW (European Statistics
282   II,     7.  2.  5    |                                             7.2.5. IRTAD (International
283   II,     7.  2.  6    |                                             7.2.6. EU Injury Database (
284   II,     7.  2.  7    |                                             7.2.7. Injury Statistics Portal
285   II,     7.  2.  7    |                                         7.2.7. Injury Statistics Portal
286   II,     7.  2.  8    |                                             7.2.8. Surveys~ ~Household
287   II,     7.  2.  9    |                                             7.2.9. Other studies and projects~ ~
288   II,     7.  3        |                                             7.3. Data analysis and presentation~ ~
289   II,     7.  3.  1    |                                             7.3.1. Comprehensive View
290   II,     7.  3.  1    |                  The figures given in Table 7.1 are based on a data model
291   II,     7.  3.  1    |                     injuries (CVI) in Table 7.1. Comprehensive view of
292   II,     7.  3.  1    |                    252 000 Fatal Injuries~- 7 000 000 Hospital Admissions~-
293   II,     7.  3.  1    |                 fatal injuries but only for 7% of non-fatal injuries.~·
294   II,     7.  3.  1    |                injury surveillance.~ ~Table 7.1. Comprehensive view of
295   II,     7.  3.  2    |                                             7.3.2. Mortality - Fatal injuries~ ~
296   II,     7.  3.  2    |                   view of injuries in Table 7.1, fatal injuries are just
297   II,     7.  3.  2    |                     claim more lives (Table 7.2. Leading cause of death
298   II,     7.  3.  2    |                   age group, EU27).~ ~Table 7.2. Leading cause of death
299   II,     7.  3.  2    |                     the Netherlands (Figure 7.1).~ ~Figure 7.1. Injury
300   II,     7.  3.  2    |          Netherlands (Figure 7.1).~ ~Figure 7.1. Injury death rates and
301   II,     7.  3.  2    |                 undetermined intent (Figure 7.2).~ ~Figure 7.2. Fatal
302   II,     7.  3.  2    |               intent (Figure 7.2).~ ~Figure 7.2. Fatal injuries by causes
303   II,     7.  3.  2    |                    male, 34% female (Figure 7.3).~ ~Figure 7.3. Injury
304   II,     7.  3.  2    |               female (Figure 7.3).~ ~Figure 7.3. Injury deaths per 100
305   II,     7.  3.  2    |                    injury mortality (Figure 7.4).~ ~Figure 7.4. Selected
306   II,     7.  3.  2    |            mortality (Figure 7.4).~ ~Figure 7.4. Selected causes of fatal
307   II,     7.  3.  3    |                                             7.3.3. Morbidity~ ~Hospital
308   II,     7.  3.  3    |                   the EU27 sum up to almost 7 million, more than 19,000
309   II,     7.  3.  3    |                    healthcare costs (Figure 7.5).~ ~Figure 7.5. Hospital
310   II,     7.  3.  3    |                costs (Figure 7.5).~ ~Figure 7.5. Hospital discharges due
311   II,     7.  3.  3    |                 treated for injuries (Table 7.3).~ ~Table 7.3. Hospital
312   II,     7.  3.  3    |               injuries (Table 7.3).~ ~Table 7.3. Hospital discharge due
313   II,     7.  3.  4    |                                             7.3.4. Unintentional injuries -
314   II,     7.  3.  4    |                   injury prevention (Figure 7.6).~ ~Figure 7.6. Unintentional
315   II,     7.  3.  4    |           prevention (Figure 7.6).~ ~Figure 7.6. Unintentional fatal injuries
316   II,     7.  3.  4    |               according to WHO, 2004) and 1.7 million injured road users
317   II,     7.  3.  4    |                  some Member States (Figure 7.7).~ ~Figure 7.7. Road fatalities
318   II,     7.  3.  4    |                     Member States (Figure 7.7).~ ~Figure 7.7. Road fatalities
319   II,     7.  3.  4    |               States (Figure 7.7).~ ~Figure 7.7. Road fatalities and injured
320   II,     7.  3.  4    |                     Figure 7.7).~ ~Figure 7.7. Road fatalities and injured
321   II,     7.  3.  4    |                     road fatalities (Figure 7.8).Even the high share of
322   II,     7.  3.  4    |            SafetyNet project (htt ~ ~Figure 7.8. Fatalities per road user
323   II,     7.  3.  4    |                     slight injuries (Figure 7.9).~ ~Figure 7.9. Nonfatal
324   II,     7.  3.  4    |             injuries (Figure 7.9).~ ~Figure 7.9. Nonfatal road traffic
325   II,     7.  3.  4    |              registration practices (Figure 7.10).~ ~Figure 7.10. Fatalities
326   II,     7.  3.  4    |                      Figure 7.10).~ ~Figure 7.10. Fatalities and injured
327   II,     7.  3.  4    |                 safety institutions (Figure 7.11).~ ~ ~Figure 7.11. Fatalities
328   II,     7.  3.  4    |                    Figure 7.11).~ ~ ~Figure 7.11. Fatalities at work by
329   II,     7.  3.  4    |            described in Chapter 6.2. Figure 7.12. Non-fatal work place
330   II,     7.  3.  4    |                 lost working days.~ ~Figure 7.12. Non-fatal work place
331   II,     7.  3.  4    |                 treated in hospital (Figure 7.13).~ ~Figure 7.13. Fatalities
332   II,     7.  3.  4    |                      Figure 7.13).~ ~Figure 7.13. Fatalities and injured
333   II,     7.  3.  4    |                  this injury sector (Figure 7.14).~ ~Figure 7.14. Non
334   II,     7.  3.  4    |                      Figure 7.14).~ ~Figure 7.14. Non fatal (hospital
335   II,     7.  3.  5    |                                             7.3.5. Intentional injuries~ ~
336   II,     7.  3.  5    |                 fatal injuries but only for 7.4% of all medically treated
337   II,     7.  3.  5    |                    treated cases (See Table 7.1).~ ~Suicide and self harm~ ~
338   II,     7.  3.  5    |                  people a yearsee Figure 7.2 ) In Europe suicide rates
339   II,     7.  3.  5    |                    000 in Lithuania (Figure 7.15.A).~ ~Figure 7.15.a.
340   II,     7.  3.  5    |                    Figure 7.15.A).~ ~Figure 7.15.a. Suicide and self harm
341   II,     7.  3.  5    |                  the European Union (Figure 7.15.b. Suicide and intentional
342   II,     7.  3.  5    |                    suicide attempts (Figure 7.16).~ ~Figure 7.15.b. Suicide
343   II,     7.  3.  5    |                      Figure 7.16).~ ~Figure 7.15.b. Suicide and intentional
344   II,     7.  3.  5    |                     and self-harm.~ ~Figure 7.16. Hospital deaths and
345   II,     7.  3.  5    |          preventability of violence (Figure 7.17).~ ~Like many other health
346   II,     7.  3.  5    |                 victims of violence (Figure 7.17. Homicide, assault by
347   II,     7.  3.  5    |               EUGLOREH countries).~ ~Figure 7.17. Homicide, assault by
348   II,     7.  4        |                                             7.4. Data discussion~ ~The
349   II,     7.  4.  1    |                                             7.4.1. Safety of children
350   II,     7.  4.  1    |                     very young ages (Figure 7.18). Injury is the leading
351   II,     7.  4.  1    |                  Promotion, 2008).~ ~Figure 7.18. Injury death in % of
352   II,     7.  4.  1    |                  deaths in children (Figure 7.19.A).~ ~Figure 7.19.a.
353   II,     7.  4.  1    |                    Figure 7.19.A).~ ~Figure 7.19.a. Fatal injuries by
354   II,     7.  4.  1    |                young people’s deaths (Table 7.2. Leading cause of death
355   II,     7.  4.  1    |                   for injury deaths (Figure 7.19.B).~ ~Figure 7.19.b.
356   II,     7.  4.  1    |                    Figure 7.19.B).~ ~Figure 7.19.b. Fatal injuries by
357   II,     7.  4.  2    |                                             7.4.2. Safety of elderly citizens~ ~
358   II,     7.  4.  2    |                    aged 65 and over (Figure 7.3) with falls being the
359   II,     7.  4.  2    |                     of these deaths (Figure 7.19.C). Injuries, at an advanced
360   II,     7.  4.  2    |                 actions are taken.~ ~Figure 7.19.c. Fatal injuries by
361   II,     7.  4.  3    |                                             7.4.3. Safety of vulnerable
362   II,     7.  4.  3    |                   risk of an injury (Figure 7.20; see also Figure 7.8.
363   II,     7.  4.  3    |                Figure 7.20; see also Figure 7.8. Fatalities per road user
364   II,     7.  4.  3    |                   transport areas.~ ~Figure 7.20. Mortality of Vulnerable
365   II,     7.  4.  4    |                                             7.4.4. Prevention of sports
366   II,     7.  4.  4    |               sports activities (see Figure 7.14).This means that an annual
367   II,     7.  4.  4    |                 sports (8%), winter sports (7%), gymnastics and aerobics (
368   II,     7.  4.  4    |                    gymnastics and aerobics (7%). (see Figure 7.21).Swimming
369   II,     7.  4.  4    |                  aerobics (7%). (see Figure 7.21).Swimming and bathing
370   II,     7.  4.  4    |                  Promotion, 2008).~ ~Figure 7.21. Sports practiced at
371   II,     7.  4.  4    |                   in this age group (Figure 7.22).~ ~Figure 7.22. Sports
372   II,     7.  4.  4    |                      Figure 7.22).~ ~Figure 7.22. Sports practiced at
373   II,     7.  4.  5    |                                             7.4.5. Prevention of injuries
374   II,     7.  4.  5    |                   and sportsdomain (Table 7.1) and that in most home,
375   II,     7.  4.  5    |                product” is involved (Figure 7.23), the importance of consumer
376   II,     7.  4.  5    |             protection is obvious.~ ~Figure 7.23: Category of products
377   II,     7.  4.  6    |                                             7.4.6. Prevention of self-harm~ ~
378   II,     7.  4.  7    |                                             7.4.7. Prevention of interpersonal
379   II,     7.  4.  7    |                                         7.4.7. Prevention of interpersonal
380   II,     7.  5        |                                             7.5. Policy and Control Tools~ ~
381   II,     7.  6        |                                             7.6. Future perspectives~ ~
382   II,     7.  7        |                                             7.7. References~ ~APOLLO –
383   II,     7.  7        |                                           7.7. References~ ~APOLLOHospital
384   II,     8.  2.  1    |                                       8.2.1.7. References~ ~American Association
385   II,     8.  2.  3    |                     impairment ( 25 dB HL), 7.7% showed 35 dB HL, 3.3%
386   II,     8.  2.  3    |                   impairment ( 25 dB HL), 7.7% showed 35 dB HL, 3.3% showed
387   II,     9            |                     Health Forum notes that 7.5% of ill-health and premature
388   II,     9.  1.  1    |                    late neonatal deaths (at 7-27 days after live birth).~
389   II,     9.  1.  1    |                     mortality in 2004 was 2.7 per 1 000 births. This median
390   II,     9.  1.  1    |                     countries from 1.6 or 1.7 (Portugal, Spain, France
391   II,     9.  1.  1    |                    Reprod Biol 1995;58(1):3-7.~ ~Breart G, Barros H, Wagener
392   II,     9.  1.  1    |                    Dis Child 2003;88(2):114-7.~Canterino JC, Ananth CV,
393   II,     9.  1.  1    |                 Neonatal Med 2004;15(3):193-7.~Castles A, Adams EK, Melvin
394   II,     9.  1.  1    |                     Bmj 1999;319(7217):1093-7.~ ~Effer SB, Moutquin JM,
395   II,     9.  1.  1    |            multicentre study. Bjog 2002;109(7):740-5.~ ~Escobar GJ, Clark
396   II,     9.  1.  1    |                     Gynecol 2004;191(3):700-7.~Garne E (2001): Perinatal
397   II,     9.  1.  1    |          Surveillance System. Jama 2000;284(7):843-9.~Jackson RA, Gibson
398   II,     9.  1.  1    |               Surveillance System. Jama 284(7):843-9.~ ~Kramer MS, Seguin
399   II,     9.  1.  1    |               Obstet Gynecol 1997;89(3):451-7.~Platt MJ, Cans C, Johnson
400   II,     9.  1.  1    |             Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 1993;7(1):45-54.~Stillman RJ, Rosenberg
401   II,     9.  1.  2    |                                       9.1.2.7. References~ ~Abramsky L,
402   II,     9.  1.  2    |              Vitamin Study. Lancet 338: 131-7.~Schaefer C, Garbis H, McElhatton
403   II,     9.  2.  3    |                   14 year olds (see Chapter 7).~ ~Cancer: Tumors recognized
404   II,     9.  2.  3    |                  from 3.0% in Romania and 3.7% in Greece to 29.1% in Ireland
405   II,     9.  2.  7    |                                         9.2.7. References~ ~Alexander
406   II,     9.  2.  7    |            countries. Demographic Research, 7(7):343363. Available at: htt / (
407   II,     9.  2.  7    |                     Demographic Research, 7(7):343363. Available at: htt / (
408   II,     9.  2.  7    |                   development at the age of 7 years. Child Care Health
409   II,     9.  2.  7    |                      Semin Perinatol. 28:81-7.~ ~Social Issues Research
410   II,     9.  3.  1    |              problems account for more than 7% of all estimated ill-health
411   II,     9.  3.  1    |                    1%, equivalent to some 3.7 million people (European
412   II,     9.  3.  1    |                     older (prevalence about 7 per 1000). Approximately
413   II,     9.  3.  1    |               aneurism causes approximately 7 000 deaths per year in men
414   II,     9.  3.  1    |                  average prevalence rate is 7.5% among adults aged 20
415   II,     9.  3.  1    |             prevalence rates of diabetes (3.7%) and the lowest healthcare
416   II,     9.  3.  1    |                     39, 9.5% aged 40-49, 15.7% aged 50-59, 34.4% aged
417   II,     9.  3.  1    |                     Health Forum notes that 7.5% of ill-health and premature
418   II,     9.  3.  1    |                                       9.3.1.7. References~ ~Arber S, McKinlay
419   II,     9.  3.  1    |                   development at the age of 7 years. Child Care, Health &
420   II,     9.  3.  1    |                Forum ISBN 1 – 898883 – 947~ ~White AK, Holmes M, (2006):
421   II,     9.  3.  2    |                births in the early 1980s to 7 deaths per 100 000. The
422   II,     9.  3.  2    |                                       9.3.2.7. References~ ~ ~Alexander
423   II,     9.  3.  2    |                    Reprod Biol 1995;58(1):3-7.~ ~Breart G, Barros H, Wagener
424   II,     9.  3.  2    |                    Dis Child 2003;88(2):114-7.~ ~Canterino JC, Ananth
425   II,     9.  3.  2    |                 Neonatal Med 2004;15(3):193-7.~ ~Castles A, Adams EK,
426   II,     9.  3.  2    |                     Bmj 1999;319(7217):1093-7.~ ~Effer SB, Moutquin JM,
427   II,     9.  3.  2    |            multicentre study. Bjog 2002;109(7):740-5.~ ~Escobar GJ, Clark
428   II,     9.  3.  2    |                     Gynecol 2004;191(3):700-7.~ ~Garne E (2001): Perinatal
429   II,     9.  3.  2    |          Surveillance System. Jama 2000;284(7):843-9.~ ~Kramer MS, Platt
430   II,     9.  3.  2    |               Obstet Gynecol 1997;89(3):451-7.~ ~Philibert M, Boisbras
431   II,     9.  3.  2    |             Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol 1993;7(1):45-54.~ ~Stillman RJ,
432   II,     9.  3.  3    |                     from 18% in Spain to 35.7% in England. Among girls,
433   II,     9.  3.  3    |                                       9.3.3.7. Acronyms~ ~BZgA~Bundeszentrale
434   II,     9.  4.  1    |                    median age in the EU (37.7) will increase to 52.3 in
435   II,     9.  4.  3    |                    people aged 65 to 84, to 7% in those aged over 75.
436   II,     9.  4.  3    |                 2003, women over 40 made up 7% of patients diagnosed with
437   II,     9.  4.  5    |                     a large employer with 9.7% of the total employment
438   II,     9.  4.  7    |                                         9.4.7. References~ ~Bhalla et
439   II,     9.  4.  7    |                 November 2004 , pp. 618-624(7)~Billings, J. R., Alaszewski
440   II,     9.  5.  3    |               reported almost being raped7.4% raped by their partner~
441   II,     9.  5.  3    |                violence was estimated at £5.7 billion (Euro 8.4 billion),
442   II,     9.  5.  3    |               Europe, perhaps as high as 10.7% in Eastern Europe. Men
443   II,     9.  5.  3    |                health problems.~ ~Table 9.5.7. Percentage of Female Adults
444   II,     9.  5.  3    |                  increases in Luxembourg (2.7 kg), Denmark (1.7 kg) and
445   II,     9.  5.  3    |             Luxembourg (2.7 kg), Denmark (1.7 kg) and Ireland (1.6 kg) (
446   II,     9.  5.  3    |               physical activity in the last 7 days per gender~ ~Table
447   II,     9.  5.  3    |               physical activity in the last 7 days per gender~ ~Current
448   II,     9.  5.  3    |                   23.1%) and Luxembourg (21.7%) had the highest rates.
449   II,     9.  5.  6    |                  346:393-403, No 6 February 7 2002~ ~Doyal L A (1998):
450   II,     9.  5.  6    |                   development at the age of 7 years. Child Care, Health &
451   II,     9.  5.  6    |                   and physical activity for 7-10 boys and girls. Available
452   II,     9.  5.  7    |                                         9.5.7. Acronyms~ ~AD~Alzheimer’
453  III,    10.  1.  1    |                    engagement in exercise ( 7 days), however, the correlation
454  III,    10.  1.  3    |                  review. Recent Dev Alcohol 7:147-164.~Jebb SA, Moore
455  III,    10.  1.  3    |                     Alcohol Clin Exp Res 22(7):285S-298S.~Thompson JC (
456  III,    10.  1.  3    |                     Med Sci Sports Exerc 26(7):838-843. ~ ~
457  III,    10.  2.  1    |                    19.9% among boys, and 15.7% among girls. The unexpected
458  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  due to COPD (see Chapter 5.7) varies from country to
459  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   at home had declined by 8.7%, while the prevalence of
460  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 measures and programmes.~On 7 February 2008 the WHO released
461  III,    10.  2.  1    |                                    10.2.1.1.7. References~ ~Action on
462  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 only 12%-13% of boys and 5%-7% of girls in France and
463  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  done by alcohol means that 7.4% of all ill-health and
464  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     Med Jun;28(5 Suppl):280-7.~ ~Eurobarometer (2007).
465  III,    10.  2.  1    |         Amphetamines have been used by 0 to 7% of school children, with
466  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   Figure 10.2.3.2) and over 7% (1.515.5%) report use
467  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     use ranges from 0.3% to 7.6%.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.3.2.
468  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     some 1.5 million (1.31.7 million) problem opioid
469  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   high level. Figure 10.2.3.7 shows the trend in drug-related
470  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     EU15.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.3.7. Indexed long term trend
471  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  value. Europe generates 38.7% of the global market's
472  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  inactive increased from 35.7% in 1992 to 39.4% in 1997,
473  III,    10.  2.  1(20)|                   per week accumulated over 7 days or 1,500 MET minutes
474  III,    10.  2.  1    |                Royal Society of Health, 116:7-13.~ ~Gordon-Larsen P et
475  III,    10.  2.  1    |                                      10.2.1.7. Excessive food intake and
476  III,    10.  2.  1    |                                      10.2.1.7.1. Introduction~ ~A well
477  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  obesity accounts for up to 7% of health care costs and
478  III,    10.  2.  1    |                                      10.2.1.7.2. Data sources~ ~a) Overweight
479  III,    10.  2.  1    |                    reported in Table 10.2.1.7.0.~ ~Table 10.2.1.7.0 Preliminary
480  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     2.1.7.0.~ ~Table 10.2.1.7.0 Preliminary information
481  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   Individual dietary record~7~General information at:
482  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   Individual dietary record~7~Volatier J.L. Enquête INCA
483  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   Individual dietary record~7~Refer to www.iuna.net for
484  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   Individual dietary record~7~Turrini A, Saba A, Perrone
485  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     Eur. J. Clin. Nutr. 55 (7), 571-88.~Latvia~Data not
486  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   Individual dietary record~7~Becker W, Pearson M. Riksmaten
487  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   Individual dietary record~7~General information at www.
488  III,    10.  2.  1    |                                      10.2.1.7.3. Data description and
489  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     al, 2003) and Portugal (79 years old, 31.5%) (Padez
490  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     the lowest in Slovakia (79 years old, 15.2%) (National
491  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 Novakova, 2006) and France (79 years old, 18.1%) (Rolland-Cachera
492  III,    10.  2.  1    |           Netherlands, 2006) (Figure 10.2.1.7.1).~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.1.
493  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     1.7.1).~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.1. Prevalence of overweight
494  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     and in Spanish boys (31.7%, 10-17 years old) (Aranceta-Bartrina
495  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     weight.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.2 shows the prevalence of
496  III,    10.  2.  1    |                      2004).~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.2. Prevalence of overweight
497  III,    10.  2.  1    |                    adults showed a range of 7-27% and 34-68%, respectively.
498  III,    10.  2.  1    |                    2006) and Polish men (56.7%) (Szponar et al, 2003).
499  III,    10.  2.  1    |                      2005a) and Estonia (45.7%) (National Institute for
500  III,    10.  2.  1    |           prevalence of obesity ranged from 7.4% to 26.6% among men and