1-500 | 501-580
    Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  5    |          publicclients, customers, patients and so forth — which can
  2    I,     2. 10.  3|              health professionals and patients.~ ~Activities under the
  3    I,     2. 10.  4|            products, medical devices, patients, caregivers, assets, equipment
  4    I,     2. 10.  4|      calculated that approximately 60 patients die each day due to adverse
  5    I,     2. 10.  4|          wards, working directly with patients and ward staff19. The implementation
  6   II,     5.  1.  1|         producing cells, meaning that patients with the disease eventually
  7   II,     5.  1.  1|              CKD at population level. Patients with neoplasias and with
  8   II,     5.  1.  1|             viral hepatitis (HBC) and patients exposed to nephrotoxic drugs
  9   II,     5.  1.  1|              than 22% of the incident patients.~Food Allergy~In adults,
 10   II,     5.  1.  1|          worsen periodontal status of patients already affected by periodontitis
 11   II,     5.  1.  3|              the interactions between patients and physicians and a good
 12   II,     5.  1.  3|               education should enable patients to acquire and maintain
 13   II,     5.  1.  3|             has been designed to help patients and their families understand
 14   II,     5.  1.  3|           hoping therefore to improve patientsautonomy and self-management.
 15   II,     5.  1.  3|            long-term accompaniment of patients where the various characteristics –
 16   II,     5.  1.  3|           trained in the education of patients that takes into account:~·
 17   II,     5.  1.  3|     subjective and objective needs of patients, whether expressed or not.
 18   II,     5.  1.  3|             providers tend to talk to patients about their disease rather
 19   II,     5.  1.  3|         designed, therefore, to train patients in the skills of self-managing
 20   II,     5.  1.  3|            cost of long-term care for patients and our society. Therapeutic
 21   II,     5.  1.  3|      conditions, although acutely ill patients should not be excluded from
 22   II,     5.  1.  3|           trained in the education of patients, and designed to enable
 23   II,     5.  1.  3|              a patient (or a group of patients and families) to manage
 24   II,     5.  1.  4|               5.1.4. Participation of patients in society~ ~A person affected
 25   II,     5.  1.  4|            their rights and duties as patients.~ ~· In the family: information
 26   II,     5.  2.  1|               an improved survival of patients with CVD.~The burden of
 27   II,     5.  2.  3|       Allender et al, 2008). Most AMI patients who receive a CABG do not
 28   II,     5.  2.  3|             perform PTCA in high-risk patients with vessel obstruction:
 29   II,     5.  2.  3|              the surgery performed on patients with AMI and that performed
 30   II,     5.  2.  3|             AMI and that performed on patients with IHD.~ ~Table 5.2.3.
 31   II,     5.  2.  3|              case fatality (including patients dying before reaching hospital);
 32   II,     5.  2.  3|         therefore the large number of patients suffering from strokes.~
 33   II,     5.  2.  4|      case-control study, conducted in patients with myocardial infarction
 34   II,     5.  2.  4|            properly followed, even in patients which have already experienced
 35   II,     5.  2.  4|               factors in hospitalized patients with IHD and determine whether
 36   II,     5.  2.  4|               years the prevalence of patients with hypertension undergoing
 37   II,     5.  2.  4|              of statins, about 60% of patients with hyperlipidemia are
 38   II,     5.  2.  6|               mg/dL in very high risk patients to 160 mg/dL in very low
 39   II,     5.  2.  6|              feasible, in diabetic or patients with established CVD) (Graham
 40   II,     5.  3.  1|         survival experience of cancer patients, after removing the effects
 41   II,     5.  3.  2|               recorded for all cancer patients. For those countries with
 42   II,     5.  3.  2|     minorities;~- cancer survival for patients living in poor areas is
 43   II,     5.  3.  2|           genetic epidemiology and on patientsquality of life. For all
 44   II,     5.  3.  2|               to treatment for cancer patients and availability of new
 45   II,     5.  3.  3|               is lower in the elderly patients than in the younger ones.
 46   II,     5.  3.  6| population-based cancer registries on patients survival in various European
 47   II,     5.  3.  6|               Adult cancer survival~ ~Patients diagnosed in 1990-1994~Survival
 48   II,     5.  3.  6|             relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between 1990 and
 49   II,     5.  3.  6|             relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between 1990 and
 50   II,     5.  3.  6|             relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between 1990 and
 51   II,     5.  3.  6|             relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between 1990 and
 52   II,     5.  3.  6|              women, younger and older patients, and rectal and colon cancer
 53   II,     5.  3.  6|             relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between 1990 and
 54   II,     5.  3.  6|             relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between 1990 and
 55   II,     5.  3.  6|              Survival for lung cancer patients remains poor, with age-adjusted
 56   II,     5.  3.  6|             relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between 1990 and
 57   II,     5.  3.  6|             relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between 1990 and
 58   II,     5.  3.  6|           rates were already high for patients diagnosed in the 1980s.
 59   II,     5.  3.  6|               year relative survival. Patients diagnosed between 1990 and
 60   II,     5.  3.  6|               year relative survival. Patients diagnosed between 1990 and
 61   II,     5.  3.  6|               year relative survival. Patients diagnosed between 1990 and
 62   II,     5.  3.  6|               to 31st December 1999~ ~Patients diagnosed in 1995-1999~Berrino
 63   II,     5.  3.  6|             their health resources.~ ~Patients diagnosed in 2000-2002~Verdecchia
 64   II,     5.  3.  6|            analysed survival data for patients diagnosed with cancer in
 65   II,     5.  3.  6|          period relative survival for patients diagnosed in 200002 was
 66   II,     5.  3.  6|          period survival improved for patients diagnosed in 200002, especially
 67   II,     5.  3.  6|               200002, especially for patients with colorectal, breast,
 68   II,     5.  3.  6|             lung cancer. Survival for patients diagnosed in 200002 was
 69   II,     5.  3.  6|         European countries, although, patients in Eastern Europe had the
 70   II,     5.  3.  7|            quality of life for cancer patients. This is achieved by transferring
 71   II,     5.  3.  7|        successful treatment of cancer patients due to detection at an earlier
 72   II,     5.  3.  7|              regarding the ability of patients to access new innovative
 73   II,     5.  3.  7|           among, for example, elderly patients, often not included in pivotal
 74   II,     5.  3.  7|              monitored;~· Most cancer patients need care for diagnosis
 75   II,     5.  3.  8|             factors. Moreover, cancer patients survival in Europe has strongly
 76   II,     5.  3.  8|         resources to follow-up cancer patients and identify and treat cancer
 77   II,     5.  3.  8|         resources to follow-up cancer patients and identify and treat cancer
 78   II,     5.  3.  8|               research organizations, patients and stakeholders.~ ~Short-term
 79   II,     5.  3.  8|          treatment and care to cancer patients, exchange information on
 80   II,     5.  3.  9|        EUROCARE-3: survival of cancer patients diagnosed 1990-94. Results
 81   II,     5.  4.  1|              be restored to safeguard patients' survival. Symptoms rapidly
 82   II,     5.  4.  1|               the quality of life and patients' outcomes on an everyday
 83   II,     5.  4.  1|             is fundamental to empower patients and involve them in reducing
 84   II,     5.  4.  2|   Governmental Health Departments and PatientsAssociations from EU countries
 85   II,     5.  4.  2|           Cardiovascular mortality in patients with diabetes~ ~ ~ ~
 86   II,     5.  4.  2|               outcomes experienced by patients identified with a diagnosis
 87   II,     5.  4.  2|             other databases: diabetic patients may be identified by other
 88   II,     5.  4.  2|           hide part of the results as patients may be discharged when conditions
 89   II,     5.  4.  2|   pharmaceutical use made by diabetic patients.~A limitation of this method
 90   II,     5.  4.  2|            information on undiagnosed patients and the general population.
 91   II,     5.  4.  2|               networks, all diagnosed patients will be included in statistical
 92   II,     5.  4.  2|              insurances only includes patients receiving a treatment or
 93   II,     5.  4.  2|             diagnosed and undiagnosed patients which is impossible health
 94   II,     5.  4.  2|          renal replacement therapy in patients with diabetes/1,000,000
 95   II,     5.  4.  2|               replacement therapy) in patients with diabetes /1,000,000
 96   II,     5.  4.  2|       Registries~Annual death rate in patients who have as primary or any
 97   II,     5.  4.  2|              the annual death rate in patients who have as primary or any
 98   II,     5.  4.  2|          diabetes coma, most diabetic patients die from macrovascular complications,
 99   II,     5.  4.  2|              but medical) in diabetic patients /100,000 general population~
100   II,     5.  4.  2|       incidence of stroke in diabetic patients /100,000 general population~
101   II,     5.  4.  2|     myocardial infarction in diabetic patients/100,000 general population~
102   II,     5.  4.  3|          cholesterol. The decrease in patients above 75 may reflect a decline
103   II,     5.  4.  3|           Spain) per 100,000 diabetes patients, with a median of 226, corresponding
104   II,     5.  4.  4|      differential selection, as blind patients are harder to reach and
105   II,     5.  4.  4|          concerns dialysis, for which patients are unfortunately urged
106   II,     5.  4.  4|       Moreover, between 25-60% of the patients are poorly controlled for
107   II,     5.  4.  5|         producing cells, meaning that patients with the disease may eventually
108   II,     5.  4.  6|               as 50% of non-diagnosed patients (prior to complications),
109   II,     5.  4.  6|             et al. 2007) investigated patients with acute myocardial infarction (
110   II,     5.  4.  6|         impaired glucose tolerance in patients with AMI. The importance
111   II,     5.  4.  6|          systems among clinicians and patients would be highly beneficial
112   II,     5.  5.Int|        meantime, European networks of patientsorganizations (e.g. Mental
113   II,     5.  5.Int|      organizations are advocating the patientsneeds in areas regarding
114   II,     5.  5.Int|          promoting the empowerment of patients and their families; the
115   II,     5.  5.  1|              of all registered mental patients at the end of a calendar
116   II,     5.  5.  1|             include institutionalised patients and do not take into account
117   II,     5.  5.  3|           hospitalization dynamics in patients with eating disorders, territorial
118   II,     5.  5.  3|              about one quarter of the patients exhibits only one acute
119   II,     5.  5.  3|               psychiatric services of patients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia;
120   II,     5.  5.  3|           diagnosis of schizophrenia; patients not receiving specialized
121   II,     5.  5.  3|      schizophrenia since about 80% of patients are treated in settings
122   II,     5.  5.  3|            information on the care of patients with schizophrenia.~ ~Inter-country
123   II,     5.  5.  3|             reflect the actual use in patients with schizophrenia since
124   II,     5.  5.  3|              were prescribed to treat patients with schizophrenia (IMS
125   II,     5.  5.  3|  significantly between physicians and patients.~There is also a need to
126   II,     5.  5.  3|           prognosis. About 50% of the patients with schizophrenia are addicted
127   II,     5.  5.  3|               therapists, since these patients experience frequent relapses,
128   II,     5.  5.  3|              shown to be about 15% in patients with schizophrenia as compared
129   II,     5.  5.  3|         efficacy of psychotherapy for patients with schizophrenia (Pitschel-Walz
130   II,     5.  5.  3|           optimizing the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, an important
131   II,     5.  5.  3|          indications that a number of patients with schizophrenia receive
132   II,     5.  5.  3|     discontinuation over 12 months in patients with first-episode schizophrenia
133   II,     5.  5.  3|              significantly greater in patients given a low dose of haloperidol
134   II,     5.  5.  3|               found that, in general, patients reported a need for help
135   II,     5.  5.  3|          schizophrenia and three with patientsrelatives) (Figure 5.5.
136   II,     5.  5.  3|         indirect costs in a cohort of patients with schizophrenia over
137   II,     5.  5.  3|          stigma of schizophrenia from patients’ and relativesview: A
138   II,     5.  5.  3|            medical services for their patients? J Ment Health Policy Econ
139   II,     5.  5.  3|            medication nonadherence in patients with schizophrenia: A comprehensive
140   II,     5.  5.  3|         Nordic Study on schizophrenic patients living in the community.
141   II,     5.  5.  3|              Prevalence of obesity in patients receiving depot antipsychotics.
142   II,     5.  5.  3|            for at least five years in patients still receiving antiepileptic
143   II,     5.  5.  3|            for at least five years in patients off medications at the time
144   II,     5.  5.  3|             cryptogenic seizures), in patients with previous stable (non-progressing)
145   II,     5.  5.  3|               recurrent. Although all patients with single unprovoked seizures
146   II,     5.  5.  3|        condition, about two-thirds of patients achieve seizure remission,
147   II,     5.  5.  3|               4.2. Data sources~ ~The patients with epilepsy enrolled in
148   II,     5.  5.  3|            have been conducted on all patients with epilepsy or in patients
149   II,     5.  5.  3|          patients with epilepsy or in patients in different age groups (
150   II,     5.  5.  3|         instances, in the majority of patients with epilepsy no cause can
151   II,     5.  5.  3|            population-based cohort of patients with childhood-onset epilepsy
152   II,     5.  5.  3|             of mortality in epilepsy. Patients with symptomatic epilepsy
153   II,     5.  5.  3|               the general population. Patients with a CNS lesion presumed
154   II,     5.  5.  3|              In the Finnish cohort of patients with childhood epilepsy
155   II,     5.  5.  3|               Sillanpaa et al, 1998), patients not in remission had a 9.
156   II,     5.  5.  3|               3.8-22.7) compared with patients in 5-year remission. There
157   II,     5.  5.  3|            regarding the mortality in patients with partial seizures are
158   II,     5.  5.  3|          Gaitatzis and Sander, 2004). Patients with epilepsy are reported
159   II,     5.  5.  3|        different methods of analysis. Patients with severe epilepsy have
160   II,     5.  5.  3|          epilepsy have a fivefold and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy
161   II,     5.  5.  3|               87.5; 95% CI 35-180) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy
162   II,     5.  5.  3|          increased risk of suicide in patients with epilepsy. While seizure-related
163   II,     5.  5.  3|             in new onset epilepsy, in patients with chronic epilepsy most
164   II,     5.  5.  3|               Nashef et al, 1996).~In patients undergoing epilepsy surgery,
165   II,     5.  5.  3|             SMR and SUDEP in surgical patients, the SMR (all causes) was
166   II,     5.  5.  3|               6-18.4) in non-surgical patients, while the incidence of
167   II,     5.  5.  3|          prevalence of comorbidity in patients with epilepsy (Gaitatzis
168   II,     5.  5.  3|               by 24 months was 86% in patients with epilepsy and 75% in
169   II,     5.  5.  3|               disease classification. Patients with and without epilepsy
170   II,     5.  5.  3|            with PR greater than 10 in patients aged 16-64 and greater than
171   II,     5.  5.  3|              64 and greater than 5 in patients 65+. A greater than two-
172   II,     5.  5.  3|              comorbidity was found in patients aged 16 to 64, organic psychoses,
173   II,     5.  5.  3|            most common conditions. In patients aged 65 or more alcohol
174   II,     5.  5.  3|              In the Finnish cohort of patients with childhood-onset epilepsy,
175   II,     5.  5.  3|     comparable levels of education in patients with epilepsy and non-epileptic
176   II,     5.  5.  3|               are generally higher in patients with epilepsy than in the
177   II,     5.  5.  3|               restrictions adopted in patients with epilepsy. However,
178   II,     5.  5.  3|             fairly low (15%) in adult patients with newly diagnosed idiopathic
179   II,     5.  5.  3|         variability of exceptions for patients with active epilepsy (seizures
180   II,     5.  5.  3|           poor seizure control affect patientseducation, employment,
181   II,     5.  5.  3|            discriminating reasons for patients with epilepsy Although one
182   II,     5.  5.  3|             society towards epilepsy, patients with epilepsy still face
183   II,     5.  5.  3|         education on epilepsy towards patients, their relatives and all
184   II,     5.  5.  3|             based on small samples of patients. For this reason, a study
185   II,     5.  5.  3|              be performed to identify patients with acute symptomatic seizures,
186   II,     5.  5.  3|       seizures (epilepsy). Cohorts of patients with a first seizure should
187   II,     5.  5.  3|               recurrence and identify patients at high risk of epilepsy.~
188   II,     5.  5.  3|             employment and driving in patients with epilepsy and the scarce
189   II,     5.  5.  3|             high standards of care to patients with epilepsy to reduce
190   II,     5.  5.  3|          problems posed by individual patients and exchange information
191   II,     5.  5.  3|            Morbidity and accidents in patients with epilepsy: results of
192   II,     5.  5.  3|         Jallon P (2004): Mortality in patients with epilepsyCurr Opin
193   II,     5.  5.  3|              study of more than 9,000 patients once hospitalized for epilepsy.
194   II,     5.  5.  3|            cohort of epilepsy surgery patients. Epilepsia 44:575-581.~O’
195   II,     5.  5.  3|             et al (2002): Survival of patients with epilepsy: an estimate
196   II,     5.  5.  3|              other causes of death in patients with epilepsy. Neurology
197   II,     5.  5.  3|            group (2004): Accidents in patients with epilepsy: types, circumstances
198   II,     5.  5.  3|         symptoms such as fatigue (80% patients) can alone interfere with
199   II,     5.  5.  3|       information of all prevalent MS patients in Norway (Myhr et al, 2006; www ).
200   II,     5.  5.  3|          serum) from all available MS patients was implemented.~ ~In 2001,
201   II,     5.  5.  3| epidemiological data on the number of patients with MS, course of the disease,
202   II,     5.  5.  3|              data sets of ca. 5800 MS patients were recorded from 82 centers (
203   II,     5.  5.  3|      Proportion of Multiple Sclerosis patients by disease course in selected
204   II,     5.  5.  3|      Proportion of Multiple Sclerosis patients by disease severity (EDSS)
205   II,     5.  5.  3|              over time. Also, when MS patients die from other causes or
206   II,     5.  5.  3|         Mortality (per 100 000) of MS patients in selected EUGLOREH countries~ ~
207   II,     5.  5.  3|       intangible costs (comparison of patientsHRQoL to that of age- and
208   II,     5.  5.  3|               of total costs) to help patients in their activities of daily
209   II,     5.  5.  3|             to these new indications, patients can receive a diagnosis
210   II,     5.  5.  3|             shows heterogeneity among patients and can be rather unpredictable
211   II,     5.  5.  3|               m; 7.0 to 9.5 refers to patients restricted to wheelchairs,
212   II,     5.  5.  3|         treatment is warranted in all patients with MS or at risk of developing
213   II,     5.  5.  3|           life and productivity of MS patients’ . An understanding of the
214   II,     5.  5.  3|             drugs is critical for the patients to ensure compliance. Other
215   II,     5.  5.  3|               published studies on MS patients and their employment situation
216   II,     5.  5.  3|              of Best Practice” for MS patients.~European Code of Good Practice
217   II,     5.  5.  3|              the optimised care of MS patients. The multiple sclerosis
218   II,     5.  5.  3|               underlines the need for patients severely affected by MS
219   II,     5.  5.  3|             also part of the European PatientsForum and the European
220   II,     5.  5.  3|               Consultative status for patients on issues such as pricing
221   II,     5.  5.  3|              and functional status of patients in Csongrád County, Hungary.
222   II,     5.  5.  3|       Hyllested K (1994): Survival of patients with multiple sclerosis
223   II,     5.  5.  3|              cause of death in Damish patients with multiple sclerosis.
224   II,     5.  5.  3|          number of multiple sclerosis patients in germany]. Nervenartz
225   II,     5.  5.  3|       associated with unemployment of patients with MS. Journal of Chronic
226   II,     5.  5.  3|              approximately 10% of the patients are younger than 50 years
227   II,     5.  5.  3|            mean duration of 12 years, patients require assistance with
228   II,     5.  5.  3|            estimated the number of PD patients at 1.2 million within the
229   II,     5.  5.  3|             000 for institutionalised patients in Germany (Evers and Obladen,
230   II,     5.  5.  3|              for healthcare planning: patients in advanced stages of PD
231   II,     5.  5.  3|          healthcare expenditures than patients in the early stages of the
232   II,     5.  5.  3|           accepted way of stratifying patients according to the severity
233   II,     5.  5.  3|         studies, more than 55% of the patients were classified as stage
234   II,     5.  5.  3|            English study, only 27% of patients were classified as stage
235   II,     5.  5.  3|     probabilities of participation by patients with mild symptomatology
236   II,     5.  5.  3|               the case for elderly PD patients, patients with advanced
237   II,     5.  5.  3|              for elderly PD patients, patients with advanced disease have
238   II,     5.  5.  3|               widely believed that PD patients do have the benefit of improved
239   II,     5.  5.  3|              study, which followed PD patients over a 10-year time-period,
240   II,     5.  5.  3|              Comorbidity is common in patients with PD and psychiatric
241   II,     5.  5.  3|              occur in up to 70% of PD patients during the advanced stage (
242   II,     5.  5.  3|              quality of life in those patients (Global Parkinson’s Disease
243   II,     5.  5.  3|          nursing home placement in PD patients (Aarsland et al, 2000; Goetz
244   II,     5.  5.  3|              for severely disabled PD patients reach9,200 per patient (
245   II,     5.  5.  3|                Späte et al, 1988). In patients with a disease onset after
246   II,     5.  5.  3|          income loss was observed. In patients with an earlier disease
247   II,     5.  5.  3|           group, only 51.2% of the PD patients were still at work compared
248   II,     5.  5.  3|             of disease. 25% of the PD patients were no longer working within
249   II,     5.  5.  3|             für Gesundheit, 1995). PD patients retired at a mean age of
250   II,     5.  5.  3|            Singer 1973). The rates of patients not working among those
251   II,     5.  5.  3|             is notable; 29% out of 72 patients stopped working due to PD (
252   II,     5.  5.  3|             and alcohol use in 144 PD patients and 464 matched controls.
253   II,     5.  5.  3|         promoting education on PD for patients, their relatives and the
254   II,     5.  5.  3|               most of the advanced PD patients supposedly live in nursing
255   II,     5.  5.  3|         access to healthcare. Many PD patients are unaware of their diagnosis
256   II,     5.  5.  3|        severity in a cohort of French patients with Parkinson’s disease.
257   II,     5.  5.  3|           Cognitive impairment in 873 patients with idiopathic Parkinson’
258   II,     5.  5.  3|        long-term care of parkinsonian patients. Psychiatr Neurol Med Psychol:
259   II,     5.  6.  3|       conditions are major reason for patients to seek expert referral
260   II,     5.  6.  3|                Over three quarters of patients presenting to practitioners
261   II,     5.  6.  3|              functional disability in patients with early RA that have
262   II,     5.  6.  3|         future radiological change in patients with early RA that have
263   II,     5.  6.  3|             of onset, at least 50% of patients were unable to hold down
264   II,     5.  6.  3|          greater in studies reporting patients in the clinic setting who
265   II,     5.  6.  6|           pain and quality of life in patients with noninflammatory joint
266   II,     5.  6.  6|             knee osteoarthritis among patients in a health maintenance
267   II,     5.  7.  1|              from other risk factors, patients with stage 4-5 CKD have
268   II,     5.  7.  1|            general population, whilst patients with ESRD have a 100 times
269   II,     5.  7.  1|               exceedingly frequent in patients with cardiovascular diseases
270   II,     5.  7.  1|            spent on treating dialysis patients. In 2001, it was estimated
271   II,     5.  7.  1|             budget was spent for ESRD patients, i.e. 0.083% of the general
272   II,     5.  7.  1|                 The costs of treating patients living on a transplant are
273   II,     5.  7.  1|               those spent on dialysis patients (U.S. Renal Data System,
274   II,     5.  7.  2|       ERA-EDTA) that collects data in patients with ESRD on RRT. Available
275   II,     5.  7.  2|               During follow-up of the patients the changes in treatment
276   II,     5.  7.  2|           mortality analyses included patients who started RRT over the
277   II,     5.  7.  3|            children aged 0-14 was 7.1 patients pmarp (Table 5.7.3).~ ~Adults~ ~
278   II,     5.  7.  3|              3-5 CKD was 7.8 per 1000 patients x years (Kurella et al,
279   II,     5.  7.  3|              for every 1000 prevalent patients with CKD in 1978. By comparison,
280   II,     5.  7.  3|      developed in 1996 for every 1000 patients with CKD in 1991. A similar
281   II,     5.  7.  3|              or 4 to ESRD in US white patients compared to Norwegian patients
282   II,     5.  7.  3|        patients compared to Norwegian patients was 2.5. This was only modestly
283   II,     5.  7.  3|              comparable, but US white patients were referred later to a
284   II,     5.  7.  3|               for ESRD ranged from 57 patients pmp in Estonia to 205 patients
285   II,     5.  7.  3|        patients pmp in Estonia to 205 patients pmp in Portugal (Table 5.
286   II,     5.  7.  3|              to the incidence rate in patients over 65 years of age which
287   II,     5.  7.  3|       improvements in survival of RRT patients (Jager and van Dijk 2007)
288   II,     5.  7.  3|              for ESRD varied from 321 patients pmp in Romania to 1057 patients
289   II,     5.  7.  3|       patients pmp in Romania to 1057 patients pmp in Germany (Tables 5.
290   II,     5.  7.  3|             increased from 480 to 807 patients per million population (
291   II,     5.  7.  3|             2007 ). Mortality in ESRD patients is very high. Five-year
292   II,     5.  7.  3|       mortality rates in incident RRT patients are 52% in all patients,
293   II,     5.  7.  3|               patients are 52% in all patients, and 21%, 32% and 72% for
294   II,     5.  7.  3|              and 21%, 32% and 72% for patients aged 0-14, 15-64 and over
295   II,     5.  7.  3|                Five-year mortality in patients on dialysis is almost five
296   II,     5.  7.  3|             outcomes in haemodialysis patients are in progress (Young et
297   II,     5.  7.  3|       mortality rates in incident RRT patients per age group, gender and
298   II,     5.  7.  3|           have shown that compared to patients starting dialysis in the
299   II,     5.  7.  3|            cohort 1980-1984, dialysis patients in the more recent cohorts
300   II,     5.  7.  3|       improvements in survival of RRT patients (Jager and van Dijk 2007)
301   II,     5.  7.  3|           States.~ ~Mortality in ESRD patients is still very high. Although
302   II,     5.  7.  3|             bias, the survival of RRT patients could be considerably improved
303   II,     5.  7.  4|              CKD at population level. Patients with neoplasias and with
304   II,     5.  7.  4|             viral hepatitis (HBC) and patients exposed to nephrotoxic drugs
305   II,     5.  7.  4|              than 22% of the incident patients.~ ~Apart from international
306   II,     5.  7.  4|             directions. The number of patients developing ESRD will, among
307   II,     5.  7.  4|               considered is that once patients have developed ESRD, they
308   II,     5.  7.  5|             Gansevoort et al, 2005) . Patients with neoplasia and with
309   II,     5.  7.  5|            appears advisable. Both in patients with neoplasia and in those
310   II,     5.  7.  5|         policy in Finland is that all patients should receive RRT when
311   II,     5.  7.  5|             quality of care for renal patients.~· In Spain there is no
312   II,     5.  7.  5|             if more than 15% of their patients fail defined limits.~· In
313   II,     5.  7.  5|                especially in dialysis patients. Since 2005, it has been
314   II,     5.  7.  5|               of how well they manage patients with CKD. This helps ensuring
315   II,     5.  7.  5|            treatment. The registry of patients (i.e. The Statistical Yearbook
316   II,     5.  7.  6|             provide support to kidney patients.~ ~Monitoring and evaluation
317   II,     5.  7.  6|              quality of life of those patients for whom ESRD cannot be
318   II,     5.  7.  6|       recipients compared to dialysis patients, whereas costs of treatment
319   II,     5.  7.  7|             2006): Quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease:
320   II,     5.  7.  7|              2001): Identification of patients and risk factors in chronic
321   II,     5.  8.  1|            the severity in individual patients. Its pulmonary element is
322   II,     5.  8.  1|             augmentation in end-stage patients, needing long term oxygen
323   II,     5.  8.  2|             in Italy: among asthmatic patients, 14% in Po Delta and 11%
324   II,     5.  8.  2|             emphysema, whereas, among patients with chronic bronchitis
325   II,     5.  8.  3|               a symptomatic cohort of patients born in 1919 to 1929, 1934
326   II,     5.  8.  3|              sample of 25-73 year old patients from Northern Italy, AO
327   II,     5.  8.  3|               areas with nearly 5 000 patients, has estimated that the
328   II,     5.  8.  3|               Co-morbidity.~ ~Elderly patients frequently have multiple
329   II,     5.  8.  3|        conditions and their impact on patients vary among patients and
330   II,     5.  8.  3|         impact on patients vary among patients and in the same patient
331   II,     5.  8.  3|               a more severe impact on patients with a given chronic disease.
332   II,     5.  8.  3|               different treatment for patients with COPD (Rea et al 2004;
333   II,     5.  8.  3|              common cause of death in patients with COPD in a study by
334   II,     5.  8.  3|             both COPD and CVD, CVD in patients with COPD is likely to be
335   II,     5.  8.  3|         analysis of mortality in COPD patients discharged from hospital
336   II,     5.  8.  3|             in a study of 45 966 COPD patients aged more than 39, with
337   II,     5.  8.  3|              of comorbidities in COPD patients with respect to a gender-
338   II,     5.  8.  3|              to compare incident COPD patients (physician diagnosed, n =
339   II,     5.  8.  3|            diagnosis of incident COPD patients related to major organ systems
340   II,     5.  8.  3|     respiratory infections (RI). COPD patients were at high risk for pneumonia (
341   II,     5.  8.  3|             out-patient population of patients with COPD (389 patients)
342   II,     5.  8.  3|               patients with COPD (389 patients) was performed in the Netherlands (
343   II,     5.  8.  3|            and 40%) than in male COPD patients (10% and 20%). Moreover,
344   II,     5.  8.  3|            small Danish population of patients affected by severe COPD
345   II,     5.  8.  3|          affirmed that a screening of patients with COPD would be helpful.~ ~
346   II,     5.  8.  3|            Wagena et al (2004) smoker patients with asthma or COPD proved
347   II,     5.  8.  3|       population of about 10 700 COPD patients, with a mean age of 67 and
348   II,     5.  8.  3|           total medical cost for COPD patients in France was estimated
349   II,     5.  8.  3|           Danish Patient Registry for patients admitted with COPD diagnoses
350   II,     5.  8.  3|             for treatment of 40+ year patients, 10% was directed to treatment
351   II,     5.  8.  3|                 The net cost for COPD patients was 256 million euro (6%
352   II,     5.  8.  3|               largest expenditure for patients with FEV1 below 40% is represented
353   II,     5.  8.  3|      Dubrovnik during 2002-2006. COPD patients (446) were treated in hospital
354   II,     5.  8.  3|        analysed parameters (number of patients, length of stay, cost of
355   II,     5.  8.  4|               in the methods used for patients selection and classification.
356   II,     5.  8.  5|         expected in the proportion of patients at end stage.~ ~Secondary
357   II,     5.  8.  5|              after smoking cessation, patients showed an increase of 47
358   II,     5.  8.  5|             smoking cessation rate in patients with AO was 16.3%, whereas
359   II,     5.  8.  5|               AL in a large number of patients at a reasonable cost.~ ~
360   II,     5.  8.  6|         established.~ ~Caregivers and patients need to be guided towards
361   II,     5.  8.  6|         should be implemented in COPD patients.~ ~Previous studies have
362   II,     5.  8.  6|              pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, yet there has been little
363   II,     5.  8.  6|              people with lung cancer. Patients with COPD generally have
364   II,     5.  8.  7|           2007): The cost of treating patients with COPD in Denmark --
365   II,     5.  8.  7|              population study of COPD patients compared with non-COPD controls.
366   II,     5.  8.  7|            diagnosis and treatment of patients with COPD: a summary of
367   II,     5.  8.  7|    health-care consumption related to patients with chronic obstructive
368   II,     5.  8.  7|             in airway inflammation in patients with fixed airflow obstruction
369   II,     5.  8.  7|            Health care utilization of patients with chronic obstructive
370   II,     5.  8.  7|              2007): Mortality in COPD patients discharged from hospital:
371   II,     5.  8.  7|         obstructive pulmonary disease patients die from? A multiple cause
372   II,     5.  8.  7|         prevalence of osteoporosis in patients with chronic obstructive
373   II,     5.  8.  7|             Anxiety and depression in patients with chronic obstructive
374   II,     5.  8.  7|           reduce days in hospital for patients with chronic obstructive
375   II,     5.  8.  7|        Wesseling GJ (2002): Detecting patients at a high risk of developing
376   II,     5.  8.  7|             out-patient population of patients with COPD. Respir Med 2006;
377   II,     5.  9. FB|          Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients~ Associations~- The SCALE
378   II,     5.  9. FB|           they can heavily affect the patientsquality of life and have
379   II,     5.  9. FB|               often underestimated by patients and underdiagnosed by physicians.
380   II,     5.  9. FB|               be elucidated, allergic patients produce an excess of IgE
381   II,     5.  9. FB|       requires more education of both patients and doctors that is crucial
382   II,     5.  9. FB|        treatment. In Europe,,allergic patients are currently underestimated,
383   II,     5.  9.  1|        associated with impairments in patients functioning in day-to-day
384   II,     5.  9.  1|      prevalence of AR among asthmatic patients is usually over 50%. In
385   II,     5.  9.  1|           symptomatic burden of AR in patients with asthma, AR can complicate
386   II,     5.  9.  1|        resource usage may increase in patients with asthma and concomitant
387   II,     5.  9.  1|         quality of life (QoL) of both patients and their families. For
388   II,     5.  9.  1|          families. For most asthmatic patients, the disease has a deep
389   II,     5.  9.  1|               Understanding asthmatic patients needs and behaviours is
390   II,     5.  9.  2|              collection and including patients from all age groups with
391   II,     5.  9.  3|               and the minority of the patients with early-onset asthma
392   II,     5.  9.  3|             in men, P 001). Asthmatic patients in remission had an earlier
393   II,     5.  9.  3|               16.1 years, P 001) than patients with current asthma. The
394   II,     5.  9.  3|              of males among asthmatic patients were most remarkable in
395   II,     5.  9.  3|               emergency admissions, 8 patients died. (Lung Health in Europe,
396   II,     5.  9.  3|            moment, in Europe allergic patients are underestimated, improperly
397   II,     5.  9.  3|              during 2002-2006. Asthma patients (4121) were treated in hospital
398   II,     5.  9.  3|        analysed parameters (number of patients, length of stay, cost of
399   II,     5.  9.  4|               often underestimated by patients and under-diagnosed in all
400   II,     5.  9.  4|              of symptoms in asthmatic patients. However, the risk of developing
401   II,     5.  9.  5|       requires more education of both patients and doctors that is crucial
402   II,     5.  9.  5|             cases are self-managed by patients with the support of general
403   II,     5.  9.  5|              be strengthened with the patients, in order to create a close
404   II,     5.  9.  5|        management approach for asthma patients as well as for other chronic
405   II,     5.  9.  5|              very first assessment of patients. The second level is the
406   II,     5.  9.  5|             specialized care in which patients are referred to and for
407   II,     5.  9.  5|             clinical guidelines. Many patients are under-diagnosed and
408   II,     5.  9.  6|               therapy as perceived by patients (Schipper et al, 1990).
409   II,     5.  9.  6|      assessment of HRQoL in asthmatic patients has been attracting an increasing
410   II,     5.  9.  6|             impact of asthma from the patientspoint of view (Baiardini
411   II,     5.  9.  6|            the comparison of HRQoL of patients affected by different diseases
412   II,     5.  9.  6|            health status relevant for patients with a specific disease
413   II,     5.  9.  6|          quality of life in asthmatic patients: measures for prevention
414   II,     5. 10.  4|             of the incriminated food. Patients and their families tend
415   II,     5. 11.  2|       healthcare needs of dermatology patients in Europe.~· the Cochrane
416   II,     5. 11.  2|    independent European registries of patients suffering from psoriasis
417   II,     5. 11.  3|        Dermatology has to satisfy the patients with those abundant common
418   II,     5. 11.  3|               2004, altogether 11,643 patients were patch tested and the
419   II,     5. 11.  3|               to gold chloride in the patients with pierced ears than in
420   II,     5. 11.  3|                0.78%) was found in 23 patients; all the reactors were women
421   II,     5. 11.  3|           Last but not least, as most patients with strong sensitization
422   II,     5. 11.  3|          patient, and up to 10-20% of patients with plaque psoriasis also
423   II,     5. 11.  3|           have a sufficient number of patients to conduct reliable studies
424   II,     5. 11.  4|              that cost being borne by patients as well as society. Small
425   II,     5. 11.  7|         Adjadj L, Pawin H (2005): How patients experience psoriasis: results
426   II,     5. 14.  3|              and health care funds to patients who need more intensive
427   II,     5. 14.  4|             the periodontal status of patients already affected by periodontitis
428   II,     5. 15.  1|              small number of affected patients. Different regions of the
429   II,     5. 15.  2|          available is maintained by a patientsumbrella organization:
430   II,     5. 15.  3|              RD) affecting only a few patients worldwide, usually due to
431   II,     5. 15.  3|             350 RD affects 80% of the patients and 1,500 RD affect 95%
432   II,     5. 15.  3|              500 RD affect 95% of the patients. The estimated numbers have
433   II,     5. 15.  3|             validated by data from RD patientsregistries.~ ~Today, most
434   II,     5. 15.  3|              it is possible that some patients have not been recorded in
435   II,     5. 15.  3|              of studied diseases, the patients have no autonomy. In terms
436   II,     5. 15.  3|            treating RD and caring for patients has not been documented.
437   II,     5. 15.  3|          reimbursement, population of patients treated etc.). The survey
438   II,     5. 15.  4|        systems to the needs of the RD patientscommunity. A first inventory
439   II,     5. 15.  4|        empowerment and involvement of patients and patients' organisations.
440   II,     5. 15.  4|           involvement of patients and patients' organisations. Following
441   II,     5. 15.  4|              of diagnosis and care of patients with RD; accelerate research
442   II,     5. 15.  4|           field of RD and OD; empower patients with RD at individual and
443   II,     5. 15.  5|               identified the needs of patients affected with a RD and have
444   II,     5. 15.  5|              or expertise; will offer patients the highest possible chance
445   II,     5. 15.  5|               level of empowerment of patients. RD patients and their organizations
446   II,     5. 15.  5|           empowerment of patients. RD patients and their organizations
447   II,     5. 15.  5|       research policies and projects. Patients are directly involved in
448   II,     6.  3.  1|            laboratory in asymptomatic patients either by chance, as a more
449   II,     6.  3.  1|         activity to find asymptomatic patients rather than reflecting the ‘
450   II,     6.  3.  2|       revolutionised the way we treat patients with bacterial infections
451   II,     6.  3.  2|          surveys, the total number of patients acquiring a HCAI in the
452   II,     6.  3.  2|              the infection. Of 87 000 patients staying more than two days
453   II,     6.  3.  2|                such as intensive care patients) or infection types (surgical
454   II,     6.  3.  3|              25%) or cancer (5%), and patients with chronic infection serve
455   II,     6.  3.  4|               detection of infectious patients and treatment for at least
456   II,     6.  3.  4|          steadily increasing among TB patients.~· Countries in central
457   II,     6.  3.  6|       majority of cases, namely those patients who do not seek healthcare
458   II,     6.  3.  6|              in children, and 35% of patients die. The main reservoir
459   II,     6.  3.  6|  life-threatening in immuno-deficient patients. Outbreaks have been reported
460   II,     6.  3.  7|           asymptomatic, the remaining patients develop severe multi-system
461   II,     6.  3.  7|           available, and up to 30% of patients may die. In recent years,
462   II,     7.  3.  4|               fatal (hospital treated patients) home and leisure accidents
463   II,     7.  3.  5|          injuries of hospital treated patients.~ ~For sure, tackling the
464   II,     7.  3.  5|          violence of hospital treated patients.~ ~The WHO World Report
465   II,     7.  4.  6|         protective factors. For adult patients who have attempted suicide
466   II,     7.  5    |      effective advisors towards their patients.~· Advocacy: Health administrators
467   II,     8.  2.  1|            are able to identify those patients on their registers who have
468   II,     8.  2.  1|    utilization patterns with those of patients from the general population (
469   II,     8.  2.  1|               presented evidence that patients with intellectual disabilities
470   II,     8.  2.  1|           prescribed medications than patients of the same age and gender
471   II,     9        |         disability than more educated patients. Numerous studies demonstrate
472   II,     9.  3.  1|             improve survival in older patients (European Heart Network,
473   II,     9.  3.  1|              as many as one-fourth of patients with deep venous thrombosis.
474   II,     9.  3.  1|              highly variable. In some patients with bleeding, the endometrial
475   II,     9.  3.  1|       important to identify and treat patients with recurrent infections
476   II,     9.  3.  1|         disability than more educated patients. Numerous studies demonstrate
477   II,     9.  3.  1|            registries study on cancer patientssurvival and care~Euro-REVES~
478   II,     9.  4.  3|               as high as 50 to 70% in patients over 75 years of age. A
479   II,     9.  4.  3|              of stroke care for older patients in thirteen hospitals in
480   II,     9.  4.  3|              25% of all breast cancer patients are aged 75 or older. Data
481   II,     9.  4.  3|               what kind of care these patients are seeking/requiring. There
482   II,     9.  4.  3|             trials conducted on older patients. Specific clinical trials
483   II,     9.  4.  3|           males. In a small sample of patients resident in Lombardy, the
484   II,     9.  4.  3|        retrospective study of 239 new patients, 60 years of age and older,
485   II,     9.  4.  3|            Over half (121) of the 239 patients were single, divorced, separated
486   II,     9.  4.  3|           women over 40 made up 7% of patients diagnosed with HIV, up 2%
487   II,     9.  4.  5|       Medicine. A large proportion of patients attending general hospitals
488   II,     9.  4.  5|              cross-border mobility of patients and enlargement. The Community’
489   II,     9.  4.  5|              health professionals and patients integrate cost considerations
490   II,     9.  4.  5|             an important subgroup. As patients, they may take on a passive
491   II,     9.  4.  7|                Abstract: Older stroke patients in Europe: stroke care and
492   II,     9.  5.  3|             State (Eurostat, 2006).~ ~Patients~ ~With increasing life expectancies,
493  III,    10.  2.  1|             of some countries to help patients stop smoking. Bupropion
494  III,    10.  2.  1|           treatment course of injured patients and can lead to surgical
495  III,    10.  2.  1|      cobalamin) deficiency in elderly patients. CMAJ 171: 251-259.~ ~Brown
496  III,    10.  2.  2|               mg/dL in very high risk patients to 160 mg/dL in very low
497  III,    10.  3.  4|              risk, with evacuation of patients and vulnerable groups representing
498  III,    10.  3.  4|             by an increased number of patients seeking emergency services .
499  III,    10.  5.  2|             greater number of elderly patients. In contrast, a Dutch study
500  III,    10.  5.  2|              England identified rural patients as associated to better