1-500 | 501-540
    Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  1        |                      at macroeconomic level (Figure 2.1).~ ~ ~ ~The analysis
  2    I,     2.  2        |                     study estimates that the figure amounts to about 260 million
  3    I,     2.  4        |                Product. The data reported in Figure 2.2 clearly show that large
  4    I,     2.  4        |                     joined the EU in 2004.~ ~Figure 2.2. Gross Domestic Product
  5    I,     2.  5        |                      achieved since the 80s. Figure 2.3 shows the significant
  6    I,     2.  6        |                  total early school leavers (Figure 2.4).~ ~Table 2.3. Total
  7    I,     2.  6        |              national educational systems.~ ~Figure 2.4. Early school leavers
  8    I,     2.  6        |                   and the Czech Republic the figure was under 40%. Women outnumbered
  9    I,     2.  7        |                   urban areas. By 2030, this figure is expected to increase
 10    I,     3.  1        |                   its own fertility history (Figure 3.1)~ ~Figure 3.1. Total
 11    I,     3.  1        |             fertility history (Figure 3.1)~ ~Figure 3.1. Total Period Fertility
 12    I,     3.  2        |                     was in Bulgaria (-5%).~ ~Figure 3.2. Population size per
 13    I,     3.  2        |                States in the coming decades (Figure 3.2). Based on the EUROPOP
 14    I,     3.  2        |                     that in the former EU15 (Figure 3.3).~ ~Figure 3.3. Natural
 15    I,     3.  2        |                  former EU15 (Figure 3.3).~ ~Figure 3.3. Natural increase rate
 16    I,     3.  3        |                   life expectancy changes.~ ~Figure 3.4. Age composition in
 17    I,     3.  3        |                composition in EU27 in 2006~ ~Figure 3.5. Age composition in
 18    I,     3.  3        |                      the end of that period (Figure 3.4 and Figure 3.5). Since
 19    I,     3.  3        |                  that period (Figure 3.4 and Figure 3.5). Since population pyramids
 20    I,     3.  3        |                   with this trend in ageing. Figure 3.5.3 shows the percentage
 21    I,     3.  3        |                  within the coming decade.~ ~Figure 3.6. Share of EU27 population
 22    I,     3.  3        |                     and did not change much (Figure 14). Poland, Slovakia, Bulgaria,
 23    I,     3.  3        |                   Belgium have the smallest. Figure 15 shows that currently
 24    I,     3.  3        |                       to the current 4.2%. A figure of 6.6% is expected in 2025.
 25   II,     4.  1        |                  Figures 4.1.1. and 4.1.2.~ ~Figure 4.1.1. Life Expectancy,
 26   II,     4.  1        |                  Limitations, in 2005, Men~ ~Figure 4.1.2. Life Expectancy,
 27   II,     4.  2        |                    mortality at high ages.~ ~Figure 4.2.1. Standardized death
 28   II,     4.  2        |                  convergence is completed.~ ~Figure 4.2.2. Relationship between
 29   II,     4.  2        |                    significant relationship (Figure 4.2.3). However, this is
 30   II,     4.  2        |                Eastern European countries.~ ~Figure 4.2.3. Relationship between
 31   II,     4.  2        |                increase since 1970 for menl (Figure 4.2.4). The regression coefficient
 32   II,     4.  2        |                   will take some 40 years.~ ~Figure 4.2.4. Relationship between
 33   II,     4.  2        |                      stronger (if we compare Figure 4.2.5 with Figure 4.2.2).
 34   II,     4.  2        |                    compare Figure 4.2.5 with Figure 4.2.2). In that case the
 35   II,     4.  2        |            convergence will take 30 years.~ ~Figure 4.2.5. Relationship between
 36   II,     5.  1.  1    |                    as in each Member States (Figure 5.1.1). At individual level,
 37   II,     5.  1.  1    |             management for all conditions.~ ~Figure 5.1.1a. Proportion of cardiovascular
 38   II,     5.  1.  1    |                     2003), EU27 – A) Women~ ~Figure 5.1.1b. Proportion of cardiovascular
 39   II,     5.  2.  3    |                      causes of deaths in EU (Figure 5.1.1). Around half of the
 40   II,     5.  2.  3    |                      IHD in men are shown in Figure 5.2.1: in all countries
 41   II,     5.  2.  3    |               results can be found in women (Figure 5.2.2) for whom mortality
 42   II,     5.  2.  3    |                     40 to 23 per 100.000).~ ~Figure 5.2.1. Age-standardized
 43   II,     5.  2.  3    |                       Men aged 35-74 years~ ~Figure 5.2.2. Age-standardized
 44   II,     5.  2.  3    |                   stroke in men are shown in Figure 5.2.3; from 1994 to 2003
 45   II,     5.  2.  3    |                 Europe and Eastern Europe.~ ~Figure 5.2.3. Age-standardized (
 46   II,     5.  2.  3    |               results can be found in women (Figure 5.2.4) for which mortality
 47   II,     5.  2.  3    |                  Eastern Europe countries.~ ~Figure 5.2.4. Age-standardized (
 48   II,     5.  3.  5    |                   482 new cases per 100,000, Figure 5.3.2a) and in Northern
 49   II,     5.  3.  5    |                   351 new cases per 100,000, Figure 5.3.2b), while the highest
 50   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      287 deaths per 100,000, Figure 5.3.4a) and again in Northern
 51   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      155 deaths per 100,000, Figure 5.3.4b).~Figures 5.3.2 show
 52   II,     5.  3.  5    |                     or constant for women.~ ~Figure 5.3.1a. All cancer (ICD9
 53   II,     5.  3.  5    |              standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.3.1b. All cancer (ICD9
 54   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.2a. Trends of all cancer (
 55   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.2b. Trends of all cancer (
 56   II,     5.  3.  5    |                standard) by sex B) Women~ ~ ~Figure 5.3.3a. All cancer (ICD9
 57   II,     5.  3.  5    |              standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.3.3b. All cancer (ICD9
 58   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.4a. Trends of all cancer (
 59   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.4b. Trends of all cancer (
 60   II,     5.  3.  5    |                   incidence and mortality.~ ~Figure 5.3.5a. Stomach cancer (
 61   II,     5.  3.  5    |              standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.3.5b. Stomach cancer (
 62   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.6a. Trends of stomach
 63   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.6b. Trends of stomach
 64   II,     5.  3.  5    |                  standard) by sex B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.7a. Stomach cancer (
 65   II,     5.  3.  5    |              standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.3.7b. Stomach cancer (
 66   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.8a. Trends of stomach
 67   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.8b. Trends of stomach
 68   II,     5.  3.  5    |               Eastern Europe mainly for men (Figure 5.3.10a). Male mortality
 69   II,     5.  3.  5    |                        Male mortality rates (Figure 5.3.12a) are declining in
 70   II,     5.  3.  5    |               Eastern and Southern Europe.~ ~Figure 5.3.9a. Colorectal cancer (
 71   II,     5.  3.  5    |              standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.3.9b. Colorectal cancer (
 72   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.10a. Trends of colorectal
 73   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.10b. Trends of colorectal
 74   II,     5.  3.  5    |                  standard) by sex B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.11a. Colorectal cancer (
 75   II,     5.  3.  5    |              standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.3.11b. Colorectal cancer (
 76   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.12a. Trends of colorectal
 77   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.12b. Trends of colorectal
 78   II,     5.  3.  5    |                 maximum levels of incidence (Figure 5.3.14a) and mortality (
 79   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      5.3.14a) and mortality (Figure 5.3.16a) rates (in respect
 80   II,     5.  3.  5    |                   had the maximum incidence (Figure 5.3.14b) and mortality (
 81   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      5.3.14b) and mortality (Figure 5.3.16b) rates for women (
 82   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    are increasing for women (Figure 5.3.14b and 5.3.16b).~ ~
 83   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      5.3.14b and 5.3.16b).~ ~Figure 5.3.13a. Lung cancer (ICD9
 84   II,     5.  3.  5    |              standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.3.13b. Lung cancer (ICD9
 85   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.14a. Trends of lung
 86   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.14b. Trends of lung
 87   II,     5.  3.  5    |                  standard) by sex B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.15a. Lung cancer (ICD9
 88   II,     5.  3.  5    |              standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.3.15b. Lung cancer (ICD9
 89   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.16a. Trends of lung
 90   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.16b. Trends of lung
 91   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    screening implementation.~Figure 5.3.17 shows that the maximum
 92   II,     5.  3.  5    |                      be associated with GDP.~Figure 5.3.19 shows that in 2007
 93   II,     5.  3.  5    |                  Denmark). Mortality trends (Figure 5.3.20) are decreasing in
 94   II,     5.  3.  5    |                constant in Eastern Europe.~ ~Figure 5.3.17. Female breast cancer (
 95   II,     5.  3.  5    |                   European standard) in 2006~Figure 5.3.18. Trends of female
 96   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    rates (European standard)~Figure 5.3.19. Female breast cancer (
 97   II,     5.  3.  5    |                   European standard) in 2006~Figure 5.3.20. Trends of female
 98   II,     5.  3.  5    |              negatively associated with GDP (Figure 5.3.21). This could be caused
 99   II,     5.  3.  5    |                Southern and Northern Europe (Figure 5.3.22 and Figure 5.3.24)
100   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    Europe (Figure 5.3.22 and Figure 5.3.24) where there are
101   II,     5.  3.  5    |         well-developed screening programs.~ ~Figure 5.3.21. Cervical cancer (
102   II,     5.  3.  5    |                   European standard) in 2002~Figure 5.3.22. Trends of cervical
103   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    rates (European standard)~Figure 5.3.23. Uterus cancer standardized
104   II,     5.  3.  5    |                     class 20-44 in 1996-2001~Figure 5.3.24. Trends of uterus
105   II,     5.  3.  5    |              positively associated with GDP (Figure 5.3.25) possibly due to
106   II,     5.  3.  5    |                Northern and Southern Europe (Figure 5.3.26) reflects the PSA
107   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    Mortality rates by years (Figure 5.3.28) are constant in
108   II,     5.  3.  5    |              increasing in Eastern Europe.~ ~Figure 5.3.25. Prostate cancer (
109   II,     5.  3.  5    |                   European standard) in 2006~Figure 5.3.26. Trends of prostate
110   II,     5.  3.  5    |                    rates (European standard)~Figure 5.3.27. Prostate cancer (
111   II,     5.  3.  5    |                   European standard) in 2006~Figure 5.3.28. Trends of prostate
112   II,     5.  3.  6    |                 Europe (Sant et al, 2003).~ ~Figure 5.3.29a. All cancers (ICD9
113   II,     5.  3.  6    |                    31st December 1999 A) Men~Figure 5.3.29b. All cancers (ICD9
114   II,     5.  3.  6    |              mortality (Sant et al, 2003).~ ~Figure 5.3.30a. Stomach cancer (
115   II,     5.  3.  6    |                    31st December 1999 A) Men~Figure 5.3.30b. Stomach cancer (
116   II,     5.  3.  6    |                  sites (Sant et al, 2003).~ ~Figure 5.3.31a. Colorectal cancer (
117   II,     5.  3.  6    |                    31st December 1999 A) Men~Figure 5.3.31b. Colorectal cancer (
118   II,     5.  3.  6    |                  women (Sant et al, 2003).~ ~Figure 5.3.32a. Lung cancer (ICD9
119   II,     5.  3.  6    |                    31st December 1999 A) Men~Figure 5.3.32b. Lung cancer (ICD9
120   II,     5.  3.  6    |                      year relative survival (Figure 5.3.33) exceeding 75% in
121   II,     5.  3.  6    |                      Coleman et al, 2003).~ ~Figure 5.3.33. Female breast cancer (
122   II,     5.  3.  6    |                      higher in Sweden (70%) (Figure 5.3.34) (Sant et al, 2003).
123   II,     5.  3.  6    |                      Coleman et al, 2003).~ ~Figure 5.3.34. Cervical cancer (
124   II,     5.  3.  6    |                      diagnosis stood at 67% (Figure 5.3.35). 5-year relative
125   II,     5.  3.  6    |                      Coleman et al, 2003).~ ~Figure 5.3.35. Prostate cancer (
126   II,     5.  4.  1    |                      diabetes with a current figure of 40.9 million, followed
127   II,     5.  4.  1    |                     over the next 20 years. (Figure 5.4.1). The latest edition
128   II,     5.  4.  1    |                     King 1998; Wild 2004).~ ~Figure 5.4.1. The Growing Diabetes
129   II,     5.  4.  3    |                      only Germany provided a figure of 52%.~Control of serum
130   II,     5.  4.  4    |                countries approach at least a figure of 20%. Overweight and obesity,
131   II,     5.  4.  4    |                   emergency dictated by this figure should be rather obvious
132   II,     5.  4.  4    |                coding practices. The average figure obtained by EUCID should
133   II,     5.  5.  1    |                     diseases and diabetes.~ ~Figure 5.5.1.1. Relative burden
134   II,     5.  5.  1    |                      Hungary and Croatia).~ ~Figure 5.5.1.2. Odds ratio (with
135   II,     5.  5.  1    |                       Slovakia and Latvia.~ ~Figure 5.5.1.3. Odds ratio (with
136   II,     5.  5.  1    |                  risk than younger adults.~ ~Figure 5.5.1.4. Odds ratio (with
137   II,     5.  5.  1    |                     Greece, Malta and Italy (Figure 5.5.1.5).~ ~Figure 5.5.1.
138   II,     5.  5.  1    |                    Italy (Figure 5.5.1.5).~ ~Figure 5.5.1.5. Death due to suicide
139   II,     5.  5.  2    |                    Alzheimer Europe, 2006a). Figure 5.5.2.1.1 uses the statistics
140   II,     5.  5.  2    |                  ageing of the population.~ ~Figure 5.5.2.1. The number of people
141   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     Prevalence and Incidence~Figure 5.5.3.2.1. Estimated prevalence
142   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     countries are missing in figure 5.5.3.3.2 due to lacking
143   II,     5.  5.  3    |                collection and documentation.~Figure 5.5.3.2.2. Inter-country
144   II,     5.  5.  3    |             Schizophrenia ICD-10 codes: F20.~Figure 5.5.3.2.3. Admission rates
145   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     rate still remains high.~Figure 5.5.3.2.4. Average length
146   II,     5.  5.  3    |                   per 1,000 populations (see Figure 5.5.3.3.2), the value reported
147   II,     5.  5.  3    |               atypicals (Knapp et al, 2007) (Figure 5.5.3.3.5).~Figure 5.5.3.
148   II,     5.  5.  3    |                    2007) (Figure 5.5.3.3.5).~Figure 5.5.3.2.5: Prescription
149   II,     5.  5.  3    |                   with patientsrelatives) (Figure 5.5.3.3.6). Internalized
150   II,     5.  5.  3    |                   chronic course of disease.~Figure 5.5.3.2.6. Experiences of
151   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 evaluated by Andlin-Sobocki (Figure 5.5.3.3.7), it can be assumed
152   II,     5.  5.  3    |                      with respect to F20-F29~Figure 5.5.3.2.7. Direct healthcare
153   II,     5.  5.  3    |                      European Brain Council (Figure 5.5.3.3.8). Although not
154   II,     5.  5.  3    |                      not taken into account.~Figure 5.5.3.2.8. Costs per case
155   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 annually, yet for adults the figure is £25 billion (Euros 36.
156   II,     5.  5.  3    |              reported in Table 5.5.3.5.5 and Figure 5.5.3.5.1. RR-MS ranged
157   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 shown in Table 5.5.3.5.6 and Figure 5.5.3.5.2. The estimated
158   II,     5.  5.  3    |                activities of daily living.~ ~Figure 5.5.3.5.1. Distribution
159   II,     5.  5.  3    |                      the European community (Figure 5.5.3.6.1. Estimated total
160   II,     5.  5.  3    |              Parkinson’s disease in Europe~ ~Figure 5.5.3.6.1. Estimated total
161   II,     5.  5.  3    |                      countries including PD (Figure 5.5.3.6.2) (Andlin-Sobocki
162   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     per patient of €7,600.~ ~Figure 5.5.3.6.2. Cost per case
163   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     HY scale in five groups (Figure 5.5.3.6.3). In the early
164   II,     5.  5.  3    |                     per patient (HY IV).~ ~ ~Figure 5.5.3.6.3. Cost of Parkinson’
165   II,     5.  5.  3    |                      disease onset, and this figure rose to 80% five to nine
166   II,     5.  6.  3    |                    2001; Hagen et al, 1997) (Figure 5.6.1), explained partly
167   II,     5.  6.  3    |                    prevalent with older age (Figure 5.6.2). A decline in the
168   II,     5.  6.  3    |                      of the working place.~ ~Figure 5.6.1. The age and sex-specific
169   II,     5.  6.  3    |           respondents (n=2755) in Sweden~ ~ ~Figure 5.6.2. Prevalence of self
170   II,     5.  6.  3    |                   group in the Netherlands~ ~Figure 5.6.2.b Prevalence of self
171   II,     5.  6.  3    |               selected European Countries ~ ~Figure 5.6.3. Prevalence of knee
172   II,     5.  6.  3    |            Prevalence of knee OA in Europe~ ~Figure 5.6.4a. Prevalence of radiographic
173   II,     5.  6.  3    |                radiographic OA by age A) Men~Figure 5.6.4b. Prevalence of radiographic
174   II,     5.  7.  1    |            biomarkers at population level.~ ~Figure 5.7.1. Development and progression
175   II,     5.  7.  3    |                     range) the corresponding figure was 7.7 cases /year pmarp (<
176   II,     5.  7.  3    |                      m2 ), the corresponding figure was 21 cases pmarp (Esbjorner
177   II,     5.  7.  3    |                    Epirce, 2007) is shown in Figure 5.7.2.~ ~Figure 5.7.2. Prevalence
178   II,     5.  7.  3    |                     shown in Figure 5.7.2.~ ~Figure 5.7.2. Prevalence of chronic
179   II,     5.  7.  3    |                     et al, 2005) in females (Figure 5.7.3), while higher figures
180   II,     5.  7.  3    |                      CKD increased with age (Figure 5.7.4).~ ~Figure 5.7.3.
181   II,     5.  7.  3    |                   with age (Figure 5.7.4).~ ~Figure 5.7.3. Prevalence of stages
182   II,     5.  7.  3    |               selected EUGLOREH countries.~ ~Figure 5.7.4. Sex and age specific
183   II,     5.  8.  3    |                  Slovakia, Romania, Hungary (Figure 5.8.1).~ ~ ~ ~In two model
184   II,     5.  8.  3    |                      results are reported in Figure 5.8.2.~ ~Figure 5.8.2. Prevalence
185   II,     5.  8.  3    |                  reported in Figure 5.8.2.~ ~Figure 5.8.2. Prevalence of the
186   II,     5.  8.  4    |                smoking habit is presented in Figure 5.8.3.~ ~Figure 5.8.3. Incidence
187   II,     5.  8.  4    |                 presented in Figure 5.8.3.~ ~Figure 5.8.3. Incidence rates of
188   II,     5.  9. FB    |                      spontaneously with age (Figure 5.FB.1).~ ~Figure 5.FB.1.
189   II,     5.  9. FB    |                  with age (Figure 5.FB.1).~ ~Figure 5.FB.1. Symptoms of allergic
190   II,     5.  9.  3    |                   adulthood and childhood.~ ~Figure 5.9.1. Wheeze in last 12
191   II,     5.  9.  3    |                   ISAAC phase I by country~ ~Figure 5.9.2. Asthma ever in ECHRS
192   II,     5.  9.  3    |                  ISAAC phase I by country.~ ~Figure 5.9.3. Asthma by age 14
193   II,     5.  9.  3    |                   ISAAC phase I by country~ ~Figure 5.9.4. Hay fever in ECHRS
194   II,     5.  9.  3    |                     Authors themselves, this figure is much lower than the prevalence
195   II,     5.  9.  3    |                     been observed since 1994(Figure 5.9.5.)~ ~ ~ ~The costs
196   II,     5. 10.  1    |                     on unknown mechanisms.~ ~Figure 5.10.1. Classification of
197   II,     5. 10.  3    |               corresponding to Sweden (18%) (Figure 5.10.2). The most commonly
198   II,     5. 10.  3    |                    12% (Rona et al, 2007).~ ~Figure 5.10.2. Reported food allergy/
199   II,     5. 10.  3    |                      food allergy worldwide (Figure 5.10.3), with an overall
200   II,     5. 10.  3    |                 Fasano and Catassi, 2001).~ ~Figure 5.10.3. Prevalence of celiac
201   II,     5. 11.  3    |                   ill-defined subtypes; this figure is higher than for that
202   II,     5. 14.  3    |                       whilethe corresponding figure for Denmark is 1.0 DMF-T.~ ~
203   II,     5. 14.  3    |                     of tooth loss in Europe (Figure 5.14.1). Edentulous prevalence
204   II,     5. 14.  3    |                 disappear in the future.~ ~ ~Figure 5.14.1. Edentulous people
205   II,     5. 14.  3    |                affects 10% to 15% of adults (Figure 5.14.2). According to the
206   II,     5. 14.  3    |                    moderate and 4% severe.~ ~Figure 5.14.2. Adults aged 35-44
207   II,     5. 14.  3    |                     of oral health services. Figure 5.14.3 illustrates the difference
208   II,     5. 14.  3    |                     58.3% at the age of12.~ ~Figure 5.14.3. Children aged 12
209   II,     6.  2.  0(2) |                specified; the official total figure has been used for the other
210   II,     6.  3.  2    |                     as low baseline figures (figure 6.1). However, two countries (
211   II,     6.  3.  2    |                   may not be irreversible.~ ~Figure 6.1. Proportion of methicillin-resistant
212   II,     6.  3.  2    | methycillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (Figure 6.1), Pseudomonas aeruginosa,
213   II,     6.  3.  3    |                      and EEA/EFTA countries (Figure 6.2). The epidemic exhibits
214   II,     6.  3.  3    |                      in the Netherlands.~ ~ ~Figure 6.2. HIV cases per million.~
215   II,     6.  3.  3    |                   risen steadily since then (figure 6.3). In 2005, a total of
216   II,     6.  3.  3    |                      in men than in women.~ ~Figure 6.3. Trends of Gonorrhoea
217   II,     6.  3.  4    |                  cases of tubercolosis~ ~ ~ ~Figure 6.A1.1 TB cases per 100,
218   II,     6.  3.  4    |                 selected countries and EU 25~Figure 6.A1.2 Tubercolosis cases
219   II,     6.  3.  4    |                      by age and gender~ ~ ~ ~Figure 6.A1.3 Combined MDR in 2005~ ~ ~ ~ ~
220   II,     6.  3.  4    |                 Combined MDR in 2005~ ~ ~ ~ ~Figure 6.A1.4 New culture positive
221   II,     6.  3.  4    |                    especially among elderly (figure 6.4) and immuno-compromised
222   II,     6.  3.  4    |              effectively with antibiotics.~ ~Figure 6.4. Trends of legionellosis
223   II,     6.  3.  5    |                    the new EU Member States (figure 6.5).~ ~Figure 6.5. Measles (
224   II,     6.  3.  5    |                Member States (figure 6.5).~ ~Figure 6.5. Measles (MCV1) vaccine
225   II,     6.  3.  5    |                     000 per year after 1998 (Figure 6.6).~ ~Figure 6.6. Measles
226   II,     6.  3.  5    |                   after 1998 (Figure 6.6).~ ~Figure 6.6. Measles trend in Europe
227   II,     6.  3.  6    |                  result of better reporting (Figure 6.7). The most affected
228   II,     6.  3.  6    |         fluoroquinolones and tetracycline.~ ~Figure 6.7. Campylobacteriosis
229   II,     6.  3.  7    |                  steady decrease since 2000 (Figure 6.8).~ ~Figure 6.8. Malaria
230   II,     6.  3.  7    |                   since 2000 (Figure 6.8).~ ~Figure 6.8. Malaria trends in Europe~ ~
231   II,     7.  3.  2    |                 level as in the Netherlands (Figure 7.1).~ ~Figure 7.1. Injury
232   II,     7.  3.  2    |                  Netherlands (Figure 7.1).~ ~Figure 7.1. Injury death rates
233   II,     7.  3.  2    |                      of undetermined intent (Figure 7.2).~ ~Figure 7.2. Fatal
234   II,     7.  3.  2    |          undetermined intent (Figure 7.2).~ ~Figure 7.2. Fatal injuries by causes
235   II,     7.  3.  2    |             fatalities are male, 34% female (Figure 7.3).~ ~Figure 7.3. Injury
236   II,     7.  3.  2    |                       female (Figure 7.3).~ ~Figure 7.3. Injury deaths per 100
237   II,     7.  3.  2    |                 decline of injury mortality (Figure 7.4).~ ~Figure 7.4. Selected
238   II,     7.  3.  2    |                    mortality (Figure 7.4).~ ~Figure 7.4. Selected causes of
239   II,     7.  3.  3    |                billions of healthcare costs (Figure 7.5).~ ~Figure 7.5. Hospital
240   II,     7.  3.  3    |             healthcare costs (Figure 7.5).~ ~Figure 7.5. Hospital discharges
241   II,     7.  3.  4    |               approach to injury prevention (Figure 7.6).~ ~Figure 7.6. Unintentional
242   II,     7.  3.  4    |                   prevention (Figure 7.6).~ ~Figure 7.6. Unintentional fatal
243   II,     7.  3.  4    |             mortality in some Member States (Figure 7.7).~ ~Figure 7.7. Road
244   II,     7.  3.  4    |                Member States (Figure 7.7).~ ~Figure 7.7. Road fatalities and
245   II,     7.  3.  4    |                      40% of road fatalities (Figure 7.8).Even the high share
246   II,     7.  3.  4    |                    SafetyNet project (htt ~ ~Figure 7.8. Fatalities per road
247   II,     7.  3.  4    |                     sustain slight injuries (Figure 7.9).~ ~Figure 7.9. Non–
248   II,     7.  3.  4    |                     injuries (Figure 7.9).~ ~Figure 7.9. Nonfatal road traffic
249   II,     7.  3.  4    |                      registration practices (Figure 7.10).~ ~Figure 7.10. Fatalities
250   II,     7.  3.  4    |                   practices (Figure 7.10).~ ~Figure 7.10. Fatalities and injured
251   II,     7.  3.  4    |                 traffic safety institutions (Figure 7.11).~ ~ ~Figure 7.11.
252   II,     7.  3.  4    |              institutions (Figure 7.11).~ ~ ~Figure 7.11. Fatalities at work
253   II,     7.  3.  4    |                    described in Chapter 6.2. Figure 7.12. Non-fatal work place
254   II,     7.  3.  4    |                      of lost working days.~ ~Figure 7.12. Non-fatal work place
255   II,     7.  3.  4    |                      be treated in hospital (Figure 7.13).~ ~Figure 7.13. Fatalities
256   II,     7.  3.  4    |                    hospital (Figure 7.13).~ ~Figure 7.13. Fatalities and injured
257   II,     7.  3.  4    |                       of this injury sector (Figure 7.14).~ ~Figure 7.14. Non
258   II,     7.  3.  4    |                      sector (Figure 7.14).~ ~Figure 7.14. Non fatal (hospital
259   II,     7.  3.  5    |                      000 people a yearsee Figure 7.2 ) In Europe suicide
260   II,     7.  3.  5    |                    per 100 000 in Lithuania (Figure 7.15.A).~ ~Figure 7.15.a.
261   II,     7.  3.  5    |                 Lithuania (Figure 7.15.A).~ ~Figure 7.15.a. Suicide and self
262   II,     7.  3.  5    |               suicide in the European Union (Figure 7.15.b. Suicide and intentional
263   II,     7.  3.  5    |                commit more suicide attempts (Figure 7.16).~ ~Figure 7.15.b.
264   II,     7.  3.  5    |                    attempts (Figure 7.16).~ ~Figure 7.15.b. Suicide and intentional
265   II,     7.  3.  5    |                    attempts and self-harm.~ ~Figure 7.16. Hospital deaths and
266   II,     7.  3.  5    |                  preventability of violence (Figure 7.17).~ ~Like many other
267   II,     7.  3.  5    |                     are victims of violence (Figure 7.17. Homicide, assault
268   II,     7.  3.  5    |              selected EUGLOREH countries).~ ~Figure 7.17. Homicide, assault
269   II,     7.  4.  1    |                   higher in very young ages (Figure 7.18). Injury is the leading
270   II,     7.  4.  1    |                   Safety Promotion, 2008).~ ~Figure 7.18. Injury death in %
271   II,     7.  4.  1    |                   injury deaths in children (Figure 7.19.A).~ ~Figure 7.19.a.
272   II,     7.  4.  1    |                  children (Figure 7.19.A).~ ~Figure 7.19.a. Fatal injuries by
273   II,     7.  4.  1    |                Kumpala & Paavola 2008); this figure represents 65% of all young
274   II,     7.  4.  1    |                    causes for injury deaths (Figure 7.19.B).~ ~Figure 7.19.b.
275   II,     7.  4.  1    |                    deaths (Figure 7.19.B).~ ~Figure 7.19.b. Fatal injuries by
276   II,     7.  4.  2    |                     people aged 65 and over (Figure 7.3) with falls being the
277   II,     7.  4.  2    |                 major cause of these deaths (Figure 7.19.C). Injuries, at an
278   II,     7.  4.  2    |              prevention actions are taken.~ ~Figure 7.19.c. Fatal injuries by
279   II,     7.  4.  3    |                   highest risk of an injury (Figure 7.20; see also Figure 7.
280   II,     7.  4.  3    |                injury (Figure 7.20; see also Figure 7.8. Fatalities per road
281   II,     7.  4.  3    |                  falls in transport areas.~ ~Figure 7.20. Mortality of Vulnerable
282   II,     7.  4.  4    |                    to sports activities (see Figure 7.14).This means that an
283   II,     7.  4.  4    |                      and aerobics (7%). (see Figure 7.21).Swimming and bathing
284   II,     7.  4.  4    |                   Safety Promotion, 2008).~ ~Figure 7.21. Sports practiced at
285   II,     7.  4.  4    |                      also in this age group (Figure 7.22).~ ~Figure 7.22. Sports
286   II,     7.  4.  4    |                   age group (Figure 7.22).~ ~Figure 7.22. Sports practiced at
287   II,     7.  4.  5    |                    of “product” is involved (Figure 7.23), the importance of
288   II,     7.  4.  5    |                     protection is obvious.~ ~Figure 7.23: Category of products
289   II,     9            |                     Olausson et al, 1997).~ ~Figure 9.T1.1. Percentage of mothers
290   II,     9            |                     varies across Europe, as Figure 9.1c illustrates. This information
291   II,     9            |                   under 10% to almost 25%.~ ~Figure 9.T1.3. Rates of Smoking
292   II,     9            |                    disease (Fig.9.T1.4).~ ~ ~Figure 9.T1.4. Relationship between
293   II,     9.  1.  1    |               Neonatal mortality~As shown in Figure 9.1.1.1, there has been
294   II,     9.  1.  1    |                          Foetal mortality~As Figure 9.1.1.2 illustrates, foetal
295   II,     9.  1.  1    |          birth weight and preterm delivery~ ~Figure 9.1.1.3 presents rates of
296   II,     9.  1.  1    |                  with normal birth weight.~ ~Figure 9.1.1.3. Percentage of live
297   II,     9.  1.  2    |                    congenital heart disease (Figure 9.1.2.1), but an overall
298   II,     9.  1.  2    |                  prevalence has increased.~ ~Figure 9.1.2.1. Trends in the total
299   II,     9.  1.  2    |                  neonatal deaths, thus, this figure is probably considerably
300   II,     9.  1.  2    |                      anomalies. This average figure is almost certainly under-ascertained,
301   II,     9.  1.  2    |                 disease has been increasing (Figure 9.1.2.1), probably associated
302   II,     9.  1.  2    |                     documented in Chapter 8. Figure 9.1.2.2 shows the resulting
303   II,     9.  1.  2    |                   TOPFA) of 3.4 per 1 000.~ ~Figure 9.1.2.2. Trends in the total
304   II,     9.  1.  2    |              Syndrome has slightly declined (Figure 9.1.2.2) to 1.0 per 1 000
305   II,     9.  1.  2    |                  over the subsequent decade (Figure 9.1.2.3). This has represented
306   II,     9.  1.  2    |                      in preventive policy.~ ~Figure 9.1.2.3. Trends in the total
307   II,     9.  1.  2    |                     Olausson et al, 1997).~ ~Figure 9.T1.1. Percentage of mothers
308   II,     9.  1.  2    |                   2005 or most recent year~ ~Figure 9.T1.2a. Percent of mothers
309   II,     9.  1.  2    |                   older in EU15 and Norway~ ~Figure 9.T1.2b. Percent of mothers
310   II,     9.  1.  2    |                     varies across Europe, as Figure 9.1c illustrates. This information
311   II,     9.  1.  2    |                   under 10% to almost 25%.~ ~Figure 9.T1.3. Rates of Smoking
312   II,     9.  2.  3    |          successfully treated in children.~ ~Figure 9.2.1a. Age-standardised
313   II,     9.  2.  3    |                  EUGLOREH CountriesBoys~ ~Figure 9.2.1b. Age-standardised
314   II,     9.  2.  3    |                      fact, Asthma UK gives a figure of 10% for childhood asthma,
315   II,     9.  2.  3(2) |                    Masoli et al an arbitrary figure of 50% of the prevalence
316   II,     9.  2.  3    |                     to be too fat, with this figure increasing to over 40% in
317   II,     9.  2.  3    |            appropriately in terms of weight (Figure 9.2.2). Girls often perceive
318   II,     9.  2.  3    |                   actual weight or height.~ ~Figure 9.2.2. Young people dissatisfied
319   II,     9.  3.  1    |                      disease (Fig.9.T1.4).~ ~Figure 9.T1.4. Relationship between
320   II,     9.  3.  2    |                     al, 2002).~ ~As shown in Figure 9.3.2.1. the maternal mortality
321   II,     9.  3.  2    |                      countries~ ~As shown in Figure 9.3.2.2., which gives the
322   II,     9.  3.  2    |                 statistically significant.~ ~Figure 9.3.2.2. Maternal mortality
323   II,     9.  3.  2    |             approaches.~ ~Caesarean Delivery~Figure 9.3.2.3. shows an increasing
324   II,     9.  3.  2    |                     Europe as illustrated in Figure 9.3.2.4. However, as these
325   II,     9.  3.  2    |                routine follow-up services.~ ~Figure 9.3.2.4. Evolution of length
326   II,     9.  3.  3    |                   after the age of twenty.~ ~Figure 9.3.3.1. Young people who
327   II,     9.  3.  3    |                      89% in Spain for girls (Figure 9.3.3.2). In almost all
328   II,     9.  3.  3    |                      in Belgium (Flemish).~ ~Figure 9.3.3.2. Young people who
329   II,     9.  4.  2    |                     service interventions.~ ~Figure 9.4.1. Ability to carry
330   II,     9.  4.  3    |                    of them related to falls (Figure 9.4.2). As much as about
331   II,     9.  4.  3    |                      experience a fall; this figure further increases for those
332   II,     9.  4.  3    |                    factor (WHO/HEN, 2004).~ ~Figure 9.4.2. Fatal injuries by
333   II,     9.  5.  1    |                     Europe and Romania, this figure may be up to five years
334   II,     9.  5.  3    |                    health risk behaviours.~ ~Figure 9.5.1. Percentage of deaths
335   II,     9.  5.  3    |                European Commission, 2006).~ ~Figure 9.5.2. Unemployed persons
336   II,     9.  5.  3    |              Statistics On-line, 2007). (See Figure 9.5.3) Carers can often
337   II,     9.  5.  3    |                       Age Concern, 2007b).~ ~Figure 9.5.3. Percentage of people
338   II,     9.  5.  3    |                selected European countries~ ~Figure 9.5.4. Girls who drink any
339   II,     9.  5.  3    |                     been fully understood.~ ~Figure 9.5.5. Adults (15+) selecting340  III,    10.  1        |                    al, 1999).~ ~The model in Figure 10.1.1 illustrates the different
341  III,    10.  1        |                      and Whitehead, 1991).~ ~Figure 10.1.1. The model of health
342  III,    10.  1        |                  message is also conveyed by Figure 10.1.2 and, together with
343  III,    10.  1        |               together with Table 10.1.1, by Figure 10.1.3.~ ~ ~ ~Figure 10.
344  III,    10.  1        |                      by Figure 10.1.3.~ ~ ~ ~Figure 10.1.3. The interaction
345  III,    10.  1        |                      women in the society.~ ~Figure 10.1.2 shows another model
346  III,    10.  1        |             confounders or effect modifiers (Figure 10.1.2) (Rosner, 2000; Szklo,
347  III,    10.  1.  1    |                   behaviours and influences. Figure 10.1.3 is also applicable
348  III,    10.  1.  1    |                      heart rate increases.~ ~Figure 10.1.4 illustrates the described
349  III,    10.  1.  1    |                      disease determinants.~ ~Figure 10.1.4. Integration of nutrition
350  III,    10.  1.  1    |                     Green and Potvin, 2004) (Figure 10.1.2). Alcohol consumption
351  III,    10.  1.  1    |                    1999; Pohorecky, 1991).~ ~Figure 10.1.5. illustrates examples
352  III,    10.  1.  1    |                    described associations.~ ~Figure 10.1.5. Examples of psychosocial
353  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     cessation.~ ~As shown in Figure 10.2.1.1.1, tobacco use
354  III,    10.  2.  1    |                      2.1.1.1 and 10.2.1.2.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.1.1. Tobacco as a
355  III,    10.  2.  1    |                diseases in all EU countries (Figure 10.2.1.1.4.).~Figure 10.
356  III,    10.  2.  1    |              countries (Figure 10.2.1.1.4.).~Figure 10.2.1.1.4. Percentage of
357  III,    10.  2.  1    |                    in the 1980s, as shown in Figure 10.2.1.1.5. It is important
358  III,    10.  2.  1    |                      among European women.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.1.5. Trends in smoking
359  III,    10.  2.  1    |                      to three decades later (Figure 10.2.1.1.6).~ ~Figure 10.
360  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 later (Figure 10.2.1.1.6).~ ~Figure 10.2.1.1.6. Features of
361  III,    10.  2.  1    |                      than it was previously (Figure 10.2.1.2.1). Across the
362  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     between 1974 and 1978.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.2.1. Trends in recorded
363  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   times) of liver cirrhosis (Figure 10.2.1.2.2).~ ~Figure 10.
364  III,    10.  2.  1    |             cirrhosis (Figure 10.2.1.2.2).~ ~Figure 10.2.1.2.2. Alcohol consumption
365  III,    10.  2.  1    |                    conditions and accidents, Figure 10.2.1.2.3.~ ~Figure 10.
366  III,    10.  2.  1    |              accidents, Figure 10.2.1.2.3.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.2.3. Alcohol-attributable
367  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     die in the EU each year, Figure 10.2.1.2.4. This represents
368  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     disease later in life.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.2.4. The share of
369  III,    10.  2.  1    |                    alcohol-related problems (Figure 10.2.2.5) accounts for €
370  III,    10.  2.  1    |              accounts for a further €59bn.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.2.5. The tangible
371  III,    10.  2.  1    |                      per capita consumption (Figure 10.2.1.2.6). The best predictors
372  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 income from alcohol taxes.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.2.6. Alcohol consumption
373  III,    10.  2.  1    |              increase between 1995 and 1999 (Figure 10.2.3.1). An increase in
374  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   drugs has also occurred.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.3.1. Lifetime prevalence
375  III,    10.  2.  1    |                    used it in the last year (Figure 10.2.3.2) and over 7% (1.
376  III,    10.  2.  1    |                      month. For cocaine, the figure is 5.3% for average lifetime
377  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  ranges from 0.3% to 7.6%.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.3.2. Overview of
378  III,    10.  2.  1    |               highest prevalence levels. See Figure 10.2.1.3.3 for trends in
379  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 cocaine use increasing7.~ ~ ~Figure 10.2.1.3.3. Trends in last
380  III,    10.  2.  1(7) |                                          See Figure GPS-34 in the 2007 EMCDA
381  III,    10.  2.  1    |            considerable variation in the EU (Figure 10.2.3.4), the reasons of
382  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  injectors in their lives.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.3.4. HIV prevalence
383  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  trends based on AIDS cases (Figure 10.2.1.3.5).~ ~Figure 10.
384  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 cases (Figure 10.2.1.3.5).~ ~Figure 10.2.1.3.5. AIDS incidence
385  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   more highly prevalent. See Figure 10.2.1.3.6 for national
386  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  injectors in their lives.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.3.6. Estimated HCV
387  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  often at a very high level. Figure 10.2.3.7 shows the trend
388  III,    10.  2.  1    |           drug-related deaths in the EU15.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.3.7. Indexed long
389  III,    10.  2.  1(16)|                                          See Figure DRD-1 in 2007 statistical
390  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  recently in many countries (Figure 10.2.3.8). From 1999 to
391  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  drug treatment in the EU.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.3.8. Trend in the
392  III,    10.  2.  1(19)|                                          See Figure HSR-3 in the statistical
393  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 levels of physical activity (Figure 10.2.6.1). On average, only
394  III,    10.  2.  1    |             likelihood decreased with age.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.6.1. Proportion of
395  III,    10.  2.  1    |        Czech Republic and 25% in Portugal.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.6.2. Prevalence of
396  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   with age for both sexes.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.6.3. Average proportion
397  III,    10.  2.  1    |                    and the latest prevalence figure divided by the number of
398  III,    10.  2.  1    |               Statistics Netherlands, 2006) (Figure 10.2.1.7.1).~ ~Figure 10.
399  III,    10.  2.  1    |                        Figure 10.2.1.7.1).~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.1. Prevalence of
400  III,    10.  2.  1    |              children’s height and weight.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.2 shows the prevalence
401  III,    10.  2.  1    |                       Currie et al, 2004).~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.2. Prevalence of
402  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   Adults~ ~As illustrated in Figure 10.2.2.3, the prevalence
403  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     and 26.0% among women.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.3. Prevalence of
404  III,    10.  2.  1    |                    children and adolescents (Figure 10.2.1.7.4). For example,
405  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  Wang and Lobstein, 2006).~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.4. Trends of overweight
406  III,    10.  2.  1    |                     Health, 1997). A similar figure was found for the World
407  III,    10.  2.  1    |                    10.2.1.7.5, respectively. Figure 10.2.1.7.5 shows the gross
408  III,    10.  2.  1    |           consumption of wine is reported in Figure 10.2.1.7.6.~ ~Figure 10.
409  III,    10.  2.  1    |                      in Figure 10.2.1.7.6.~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.5. Gross human
410  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   products, 2004 (1 000 t)~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.5. Trends in gross
411  III,    10.  2.  1    |                       1995-2002 (1995=100)~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.6. Average annual
412  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  underlying scientific data (Figure 10.2.1.7.7).~ ~Figure 10.
413  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  data (Figure 10.2.1.7.7).~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.7. FBDG for different
414  III,    10.  3.  1    |                      is possible as shown in Figure 8.1.1.1.~ ~Figure 10.3.1.
415  III,    10.  3.  1    |                   shown in Figure 8.1.1.1.~ ~Figure 10.3.1.1. The percentage
416  III,    10.  3.  1    |                     the logarithmic scale of Figure 8.1.1.2. It was also estimated
417  III,    10.  3.  1    |                  exposure (Babisch, 2006).~ ~Figure 10.3.1.2. The environmental
418  III,    10.  3.  2    |                     contaminated products.~ ~Figure 10.3.2.1. Life cycle of
419  III,    10.  3.  2    |                       between 1995 and 2005 (Figure 10.3.2.2). The production
420  III,    10.  3.  2    |                      was 212 million tonnes (Figure 10.3.2.3), 9.3%of which
421  III,    10.  3.  2    |                  environment (ASEF, 2006).~ ~Figure 10.3.2.2. Production volumes
422  III,    10.  3.  2    |                    Member States 19952005~ ~Figure 10.3.2.3. Production of
423  III,    10.  3.  2    |                      the study summarized in Figure 10.3.2.4 shows decreasing
424  III,    10.  3.  2    |                   flame retardants (PBDE).~ ~Figure 10.3.2.4. Persistent Organic
425  III,    10.  3.  2    |          polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCN) (figure 10.3.2.4; note different
426  III,    10.  3.  3    |                 occurring throughout Europe (Figure 10.3.3.1). However, two
427  III,    10.  3.  3    |                   may not be irreversible.~ ~Figure 10.3.3.1. Proportion of
428  III,    10.  3.  4    |                 affected are included in the figure. Accidents include the following
429  III,    10.  3.  4    |                expected excess death rate.~ ~Figure 10.3.4.1. The distribution
430  III,    10.  3.  4    |                     effects on human health (Figure 10.3.4.2). The total economic
431  III,    10.  3.  4    |                following flooding events .~ ~Figure 10.3.4.2. Frequency of floods
432  III,    10.  4.  1    |                     of 40 μg/m3 is exceeded.~Figure 10.4.1.1 presents the total
433  III,    10.  4.  1    |                    the last available year); Figure 10.4.1.2 shows the changes
434  III,    10.  4.  1    |                 living children in cities.~ ~Figure 10.4.1.1. Percentage of
435  III,    10.  4.  2    |                   magnitude of the estimated figure. The Opinion gave basic
436  III,    10.  4.  2    |                      of Regulation 396/2005 (Figure 1).~ ~Figure 10.4.2.1. Entry
437  III,    10.  4.  2    |            Regulation 396/2005 (Figure 1).~ ~Figure 10.4.2.1. Entry into force
438  III,    10.  4.  2    |                    were held in 16rounds” (Figure 10.4.2.2).~ ~ ~Figure 10.
439  III,    10.  4.  2    |                        Figure 10.4.2.2).~ ~ ~Figure 10.4.2.2. Pesticides Peer
440  III,    10.  4.  2    |                  Ireland, performs its role (Figure 1). FVO inspectors carry
441  III,    10.  4.  3    |                       Valent et al, 2004).~ ~Figure 10.4.3.1. Deaths among children
442  III,    10.  4.  3    |                   illness from 2000 to 2005 (Figure 10.4.3.2).~ ~Figure 10.4.
443  III,    10.  4.  3    |                    2005 (Figure 10.4.3.2).~ ~Figure 10.4.3.2. Number of reported
444  III,    10.  4.  3    |                      rising from 58% to 80% (Figure 10.4.3.3). According to
445  III,    10.  4.  3    |                    of safe drinking-water.~ ~Figure 10.4.3.3. Percentage of
446  III,    10.  4.  3    |                      sanitation systems (see Figure 10.4.3.2).~ ~A special case
447  III,    10.  4.  3    |            population in European countries (Figure 10.4.3.4) were connected
448  III,    10.  4.  3    |                increase from 1995 to 2003.~ ~Figure 10.4.3.4. Changes over time
449  III,    10.  4.  4    |                    product” is involved (see Figure 7.23), the importance of
450  III,    10.  4.  5    |                mandatory European standards (Figure 10.4.5.1.1. A and B) (EEA,
451  III,    10.  4.  5    |                      A and B) (EEA, 2008).~ ~Figure 10.4.5.1.1.a. Bathing water.
452  III,    10.  4.  5    |                directives in coastal water~ ~Figure 10.4.5.1.1.b. Bathing water.
453  III,    10.  4.  5    |                    storage of chemicals (see Figure 10.4.5.2.1; EEA, 2007a).~ ~
454  III,    10.  4.  5    |                  playgrounds (EEA, 2007b).~ ~Figure 10.4.5.2.1. Overview of
455  III,    10.  4.  5    |                    per capita per year. This figure has been calculated based
456  III,    10.  4.  5    |                  volumes of municipal waste (Figure 10.4.5.2.2). However, the
457  III,    10.  4.  5    |                 re-unification of Germany.~ ~Figure 10.4.5.2.2a. Total waste
458  III,    10.  4.  5    |                  sector, 2004 (EECCA 2004)~ ~Figure 10.4.5.2.2b. Total waste
459  III,    10.  4.  5    |                 sector, 2004 (EU-10, 2004)~ ~Figure 10.4.5.2.2c. Total waste
460  III,    10.  4.  5    |                Russia the dominant producer (Figure 10.4.5.2.3). The large differences
461  III,    10.  4.  5    |                   not entirely comparable.~ ~Figure 10.4.5.2.3. Hazardous waste
462  III,    10.  4.  5    |                         Soil contamination~ ~Figure 10.4.5.2.4. Overview of
463  III,    10.  4.  5    |               contaminated sites in Europe~ ~Figure 10.4.5.2.5. Breakdown of
464  III,    10.  4.  5    |                  contamination per country~ ~Figure 10.4.5.2.6. Detailed analysis
465  III,    10.  4.  5    |                  contamination per country~ ~Figure 10.4.5.2.7. Overview of
466  III,    10.  4.  5    |              remediated sites are available (Figure 10.4.5.2.4).~ ~The distribution
467  III,    10.  4.  5    |                    total investigated sites (Figure 10.4.5.2.5).~ ~At industrial
468  III,    10.  4.  5    |                    in national inventories ((Figure 10.4.5.2.6).~ ~The range
469  III,    10.  4.  5    |                      contaminants in Europe (Figure 10.4.5.2.7). These estimates
470  III,    10.  5.  1    |                 countries fall short of this figure and may provide public water
471  III,    10.  5.  1    |                     20% of the population.~ ~Figure 10.5.1.1. Proportion of
472  III,    10.  5.  1    |                    WHO, 2005; EEA, 2006b).~ ~Figure 10.5.1.2. Concentrations
473  III,    10.  5.  1    |                     socio-economic groups.~ ~Figure 10.5.1.3. Housing problems
474  III,    10.  5.  1    |                     the indicated average.~ ~Figure 10.5.1.4. Crowding by income
475  III,    10.  5.  2    |              rural settlements structures.~ ~Figure 10.5.2.1. Population distribution
476  III,    10.  5.  2    |                Figures 10.5.2.2-10.5.2.4).~ ~Figure 10.5.2.2. Complaints by
477  III,    10.  5.  2    |                   environmental conditions~ ~Figure 10.5.2.3. Complaints due
478  III,    10.  5.  2    |                   urban and rural settings~ ~Figure 10.5.2.4. Complaint about
479  III,    10.  5.  2    |                     for males and females.~ ~Figure 10.5.2.5. Correlation of
480  III,    10.  5.  2    |                   rural settlements, males~ ~Figure 10.5.2.6. Correlation between
481  III,    10.  5.  2    |                      the older population.~ ~Figure 10.5.2.7. Life expectancy
482  III,    10.  5.  2    |          rural settings in Lithuania, 2006~ ~Figure 10.5.2.8. Mortality rates
483  III,    10.  5.  2    |                     the new member States.~ ~Figure 10.5.2.9. Self-reported
484  III,    10.  5.  2    |                     joined the EU in 2004.~ ~Figure 10.5.2.10. Long-standing
485  III,    10.  5.  2    |                    and preventive actions.~ ~Figure 10.5.2.11. Health problems
486  III,    10.  5.  2    |               prevalent in rural settings.~ ~Figure 10.5.2.12. Infection prevalence
487  III,    10.  5.  3    |                  elements of work economies. Figure 10.5.3.1 summarizes the
488  III,    10.  5.  3    |                     economically inactive.~ ~Figure 10.5.3.1. Work status of
489  III,    10.  6.  1    |                 France and 28% in Belgium.~ ~Figure 10.6.1. Frequency of contact
490  III,    10.  6.  1    |                      Currie et al., 2008).~ ~Figure 10.6.2. 15-year old girls
491  III,    10.  6.  1    |                 friends of the same gender~ ~Figure 10.6.3. 15-year old boys
492  III,    10.  6.  1    |                      Currie et al., 2008).~ ~Figure 10.6.4. Use of electronic
493  III,    10.  6.  1    |                     Van Dijk et al, 2005).~ ~Figure 10.6.5. Exposures to assaults
494  III,    10.  6.  2    |           inequalities in men than in women (Figure 10.6.2.1). Inequalities
495  III,    10.  6.  2    |                      those due to education (Figure 10.6.2.2). These inequalities
496  III,    10.  6.  2    |                      of mortality decline.~ ~Figure 10.6.2.1. Educational inequalities
497  III,    10.  6.  2    |               European Countries per cause~ ~Figure 10.6.2.2. Inequalities in
498  III,    10.  6.  3    |                carried out in Chapter 7 (See figure 7.17).~ ~Contact crimes:
499  III,    10.  6.  3    |                     than for other offences. Figure 10.6.3.1. shows the results.
500  III,    10.  6.  3    |                Hungary and Spain (below 2%). Figure 10.6.3.1. shows national