Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  4        |            inflate the growth rate. Table 2.1 provides an overview
  2    I,     2.  4        |         rapidly varying downward.~ ~Table 2.1. Growth rate of real
  3    I,     2.  4        |            observed (APPLICA, 2005; Table 2.2).~ ~Table 2.2. At risk
  4    I,     2.  4        |        APPLICA, 2005; Table 2.2).~ ~Table 2.2. At risk of poverty
  5    I,     2.  6        |          upper secondary education (Table 2.3) and of total early
  6    I,     2.  6        |             leavers (Figure 2.4).~ ~Table 2.3. Total population percentage
  7    I,     2.  8        |        generation below as shown in Table 2.4.~ ~ ~Table 2.4. Health
  8    I,     2.  8        |             shown in Table 2.4.~ ~ ~Table 2.4. Health impacts of different
  9   II,     4.  1        |      between different countries.~ ~Table 4.1.1 shows estimates for
 10   II,     4.  1        |           women, the gender gaps.~ ~Table 4.1.1. Life expectancy (
 11   II,     4.  1        |            and women, respectively (Table 4.1.1). Although in 2005
 12   II,     4.  1        |           an idea of likely trends. Table 4.1.2 gives estimates of
 13   II,     4.  1        |             with the ECHP survey.~ ~Table 4.1.2. Life expectancy and
 14   II,     4.  1        |         Robine and Michel, 2004).~ ~Table 4.1.3 shows 10-year trends
 15   II,     4.  1        |             the EU27 by gender. The table also displays the maximum,
 16   II,     4.  1        |             MS level within EU27.~ ~Table 4.1.3. Life expectancy at
 17   II,     4.  1        |     longevity gender gap by 1 year (Table 4.1.3). Estimates shown
 18   II,     4.  1        |            1.3). Estimates shown in Table 4.1.3 for LE only suggest
 19   II,     4.  1        |        between the MS since 1995.~ ~Table 4.1.4. Minimum and maximum
 20   II,     4.  1        |               in 2005, per gender~ ~Table 4.1.4 underlines the significant
 21   II,     4.  1        |             0 years gap) for women. Table 4.1.4 provides additional
 22   II,     4.  1        |            countries, LE does. Thus Table 4.1.7 presents the values
 23   II,     4.  1        |            and Welfare, 2006).5~ ~ ~Table 4.1.5. Life expectancy at
 24   II,     4.  1        |         1995 and 2005, per gender~ ~Table 4.1.5 shows firstly that
 25   II,     4.  1        |             in Japan. Secondly, the table shows that gender gaps range
 26   II,     4.  2        |            the 1990s (2.7 years).~ ~Table 4.2.1 shows the contribution
 27   II,     4.  2        |      reaching even 40% for women.~ ~Table 4.2.1. Arriaga decomposition
 28   II,     4.  2        |         changes by causes of death. Table 4.2.2 shows the contribution
 29   II,     4.  2        |          one among men decreased.~ ~Table 4.2.2. Arriaga decomposition
 30   II,     4.  2        |           of death, EU15 average.~ ~Table 4.2.3 shows the Arriaga
 31   II,     4.  2        |            of the European Union.~ ~Table 4.2.3. Arriaga decomposition
 32   II,     4.  2        |      diseases (causes 6, 7 and 8 in table 3) has contributed most
 33   II,     4.  2        |             causes 2, 3, 4 and 5 in table 3), had a smaller impact
 34   II,     4.  2        |  gynaecological cancers (cause 4 in table 3) had a negative impact
 35   II,     4.  2        |     Infectious diseases (cause 1 in table 3) did not have a large
 36   II,     4.  2        |    respiratory diseases (cause 9 in table 3) declined in most countries.
 37   II,     4.  2        |             causes 10, 11 and 12 in table 3) has decreased in most
 38   II,     4.  2        |      related mortality (cause 13 in table 3) had a negative effect
 39   II,     4.  2        |       causes of death’ (cause 14 in table 3) across European countries.
 40   II,     4.  2        |             respiratory diseases.~ ~Table 4.2.4 shows by how many
 41   II,     4.  2        |            expectancy at birth. The table shows that for men in 7
 42   II,     4.  2        |      increase in life expectancy.~ ~Table 4.2.4. Contribution of change
 43   II,     4.  2        |          2000, selected countries~ ~Table 4.2.5 shows that cancers
 44   II,     4.  2        |         larger than in the 1980s.~ ~Table 4.2.5. The effect of smoking
 45   II,     4.  2        |             65+) in recent decades, table 6 shows the average change
 46   II,     4.  2        |            decades were selected.~ ~Table 4.2.6. Average annual change
 47   II,     4.  2        |           65, selected countries.~ ~Table 4.2.6 shows that in 11 out
 48   II,     4.  2        |       larger than that for women.~ ~Table 4.2.7 shows the development
 49   II,     4.  2        |            between men and women.~ ~Table 4.2.7. Average annual change
 50   II,     5.  1.  1    |          non-communicable diseases (Table 5.1.1). On the other hand,
 51   II,     5.  1.  1    |         2003), EU27B) Men.~ ~ ~ ~Table 5.1.1. Risk factors for
 52   II,     5.  2.  3    |           Eastern Europe countries (Table 5.2.1). According to the
 53   II,     5.  2.  3    |        France and 167 in Latvia).~ ~Table 5.2.1. Ischemic heart diseases (
 54   II,     5.  2.  3    |           35-74 years~ ~Morbidity~ ~Table 5.2.2 shows IHD and AMI
 55   II,     5.  2.  3    |           trends in medical care.~ ~Table 5.2.2. Crude hospital discharge
 56   II,     5.  2.  3    |          considered and reported in Table 5.2.3 (Allender et al, 2008).
 57   II,     5.  2.  3    |             on patients with IHD.~ ~Table 5.2.3. Crude rates per 1
 58   II,     5.  2.  3    |         MONICA Project, reported in Table 5.2.4; here we can see mean
 59   II,     5.  2.  3    |             Working Group, 2003).~ ~Table 5.2.4. WHO-MONICA 13 EU
 60   II,     5.  2.  3    |      differences among countries.~ ~Table 5.2.5. Age-standardized (
 61   II,     5.  2.  3    |           times higher. As shown in table 5.2.5, in the age range
 62   II,     5.  2.  3    |           35-84 years~ ~Morbidity~ ~Table 5.2.2 also shows stroke
 63   II,     5.  2.  3    |          These data are reported in Table 5.2.6: here mean attack
 64   II,     5.  2.  3    |     severity (Sarti et al, 2003).~ ~Table 5.2.6. WHO-MONICA Project
 65   II,     5.  2.  4    |         health examination surveys. Table 5.2.7 (htt b, 2007) provides
 66   II,     5.  2.  4    |           140 o 90 mmHg; 160 mmHg).~Table 5.2.8 shows data on total
 67   II,     5.  2.  4    |         higher among elderly women.~Table 5.2.9 reports smoking habit
 68   II,     5.  2.  4    |              see also Chapter 8).~ ~Table 5.2.7. Estimated prevalence
 69   II,     5.  2.  4    |        ranges in 22 EU countries.~ ~Table 5.2.8. Estimated mean values
 70   II,     5.  2.  4    |             different age ranges.~ ~Table 5.2.9. Estimated prevalence
 71   II,     5.  2.  4    |             Obesity and overweight (Table 5.2.10) are also included
 72   II,     5.  2.  4    |             see also Chapter 10).~ ~Table 5.2.10. Estimated prevalence
 73   II,     5.  2.  4    |             the WHO-MONICA Project (Table 5.2.11) collected between
 74   II,     5.  2.  4    |         environmental conditions.~ ~Table 5.2.11. Prevalence of smoking (%),
 75   II,     5.  3.  1    |            public health relevance. Table 5.3.1 shows the burden of
 76   II,     5.  3.  1    |             as estimated in 2006.~ ~Table 5.3.1. Estimated incident
 77   II,     5.  3.  7    |            of EU Member States (see Table 5.3.2) consider national
 78   II,     5.  3.  7    |           improve cancer control.~ ~Table 5.3.2. Cancer national control
 79   II,     5.  4.  2    |        fundamental recommendations (Table 5.4.1). The Declaration
 80   II,     5.  4.  2    |      broader international level.~ ~Table 5.4.1. Recommendations St.
 81   II,     5.  4.  2    |          Greenfield et al 2004, see Table 5.4.2), only three were
 82   II,     5.  4.  2    |           and Outcomes Framework.~ ~Table 5.4.2. OECD indicators~ ~ ~
 83   II,     5.  4.  2    |           Tables 5.4.3 and 5.4.4.~ ~Table 5.4.3. EUDIP core indicators
 84   II,     5.  4.  2    |             as a secondary cause.~ ~Table 5.4.4. EUDIP secondary indicators
 85   II,     5.  4.  6    |      Luxembourg, 1-2 June 2006 (see Table 5.4.1);~ ~Table 5.4.1. EU
 86   II,     5.  4.  6    |           2006 (see Table 5.4.1);~ ~Table 5.4.1. EU Council Recommendations~
 87   II,     5.  4.  7    |       include all aspects listed in table 5.4.5, which are highly
 88   II,     5.  5.  1    |           anxiety disorder was 14%. Table 5.5.1.1 presents lifetime
 89   II,     5.  5.  1    |             six ESEMeD countries.~ ~Table 5.5.1.1 Lifetime and 12
 90   II,     5.  5.  1    |          Practitioners (GP) only.~ ~Table 5.5.1.2. Level of care use (%)
 91   II,     5.  5.  1    |     generalised anxiety disorder.~ ~Table 5.5.1.3. Lifetime suicidal
 92   II,     5.  5.  1    |           and increased with age.~ ~Table 5.5.1.4. Psychological distress
 93   II,     5.  5.  1    |           psychological distress.~ ~Table 5.5.1.5. Odds Ratio for
 94   II,     5.  5.  1    |             Europe are presented in Table 5.5.1.6.~ ~Table 5.5.1.6.
 95   II,     5.  5.  1    |       presented in Table 5.5.1.6.~ ~Table 5.5.1.6. Annually age adjusted
 96   II,     5.  5.  1    |  approximately 12 years is given in Table 5.5.1.7.~ ~Table 5.5.1.7.
 97   II,     5.  5.  1    |           given in Table 5.5.1.7.~ ~Table 5.5.1.7. Age adjusted mortality
 98   II,     5.  5.  1    |              In the 0-14 age group (Table 5.5.1.8) the suicide rates
 99   II,     5.  5.  1    |       United Kingdom and Ireland.~ ~Table 5.5.1.8. Number of deaths (
100   II,     5.  5.  2    |          suffering from dementia.~ ~Table 5.5.2.1. EURODEM prevalence
101   II,     5.  5.  2    |          EURODEM prevalence rates~ ~Table 5.5.2.2. Prevalence rates
102   II,     5.  5.  2    |           results are as follows:~ ~Table 5.5.2.3. The estimated number
103   II,     5.  5.  3    |          countries. The overview in table 5.5.3.1.2.1 illustrates
104   II,     5.  5.  3    |      participated in the project.~ ~Table 5.5.3.1.1 Overview of data
105   II,     5.  5.  3    |         Sweden~ ~X~ ~Turkey~ ~X~ ~ ~Table 5.5.3.1.2.1: Available data
106   II,     5.  5.  3    |          accounting for 6.2% YLDs).~Table 5.5.3.2.1. DALYs due to
107   II,     5.  5.  3    |      important aspect of morbidity.~Table 5.5.3.2.2. Prevalence and
108   II,     5.  5.  3    |      recommendations in guidelines (Table 5.5.3.2.3).~Table 5.5.3.
109   II,     5.  5.  3    |       guidelines (Table 5.5.3.2.3).~Table 5.5.3.2.3. Psychosocial
110   II,     5.  5.  3    |          Collaboration, 2003) – see table 5.5.3.2.4.~Table 5.5.3.2.
111   II,     5.  5.  3    |                see table 5.5.3.2.4.~Table 5.5.3.2.4. European practice
112   II,     5.  5.  3    |            and respective deficits.~Table 5.5.3.2.5. Mental health
113   II,     5.  5.  3    |            for outpatient care (see Table 5.5.3.3.6). Since psychotic
114   II,     5.  5.  3    |              Lindström et al, 2007)~Table 5.5.3.2.6. Expenditures
115   II,     5.  5.  3    |             parts of the continent (Table 5.5.3.4.1). The annual incidence
116   II,     5.  5.  3    |        children and in the elderly (Table 5.5.3.4.2), even with significant
117   II,     5.  5.  3    |             and the study design.~ ~Table 5.5.3.4.1. Incidence of
118   II,     5.  5.  3    |             of epilepsy in Europe~ ~Table 5.5.3.4.2. Incidence (per
119   II,     5.  5.  3    |          from 3.2 to 7.8 per 1,000 (Table 5.5.3.4.3). The prevalence
120   II,     5.  5.  3    |    incidence studies (see above).~ ~Table 5.5.3.4.3. Prevalence of
121   II,     5.  5.  3    |          and adults (Jallon, 2004) (Table 5.5.3.4.4). These data are
122   II,     5.  5.  3    |             symptomatic seizures.~ ~Table 5.5.3.4.4. Community-based
123   II,     5.  5.  3    |            simple partial seizures)(Table 5.5.3.4.5). The issue of
124   II,     5.  5.  3    |      patient-doctor relationship.~ ~Table 5.5.3.4.5. National legislations
125   II,     5.  5.  3    |         Country, where available.~ ~Table 5.5.3.5.1. Prevalence of
126   II,     5.  5.  3    |       selected EUGLOREH Countries~ ~Table 5.5.3.5.2. Prevalence (per
127   II,     5.  5.  3    |       EUGLOREH Contries by gender~ ~Table 5.5.3.5.3. Prevalence (per
128   II,     5.  5.  3    |           by age (best estimates)~ ~Table 5.5.3.5.4. Incidence (per
129   II,     5.  5.  3    |       disease course is reported in Table 5.5.3.5.5 and Figure 5.5.
130   II,     5.  5.  3    |            35% (The Netherlands).~ ~Table 5.5.3.5.5. Proportion of
131   II,     5.  5.  3    |        disability score is shown in Table 5.5.3.5.6 and Figure 5.5.
132   II,     5.  5.  3    |            severe MS (EDSS 7-9.5)~ ~Table 5.5.3.5.6. Proportion of
133   II,     5.  5.  3    |            in Europe is reported in Table 7 Decreasing trends over
134   II,     5.  5.  3    |        range from about 30 to 45.~ ~Table 5.5.3.5.7. Mortality (per
135   II,     5.  5.  3    |      different studies are shown in Table 5. 5. 3. 6. 1.~ ~Table 5.
136   II,     5.  5.  3    |           in Table 5. 5. 3. 6. 1.~ ~Table 5.5.3.6.1. Incidence studies
137   II,     5.  5.  3    |        prevalence are summarised in Table 5.5.3.6.2..(von Campenhausen
138   II,     5.  5.  3    |        Campenhausen et al, 2005).~ ~Table 5.5.3.6.2. Prevalence studies
139   II,     5.  5.  3    |        found in only a few studies (Table 5.5.3.6.3. Distribution
140   II,     5.  5.  3    |         1994; Mutch et al, 1986).~ ~Table 5.5.3.6.3. Distribution
141   II,     5.  6.  3    |         Symmons, 2003) are given in table 5.6.1.~ ~Table 5.6.1. General
142   II,     5.  6.  3    |             given in table 5.6.1.~ ~Table 5.6.1. General Incidence
143   II,     5.  6.  3    |        intensive physical activity (Table 5.6.4). The pain and disability
144   II,     5.  6.  3    |             Symmons et al, 2003).~ ~Table 5.6.2. Osteoarthritis Incidence
145   II,     5.  6.  3    |       selected European countries~ ~Table 5.6.3. Osteoarthritis Prevalence
146   II,     5.  6.  3    |       selected EUGLOREH Countries~ ~Table 5.6.4. Osteoarthritis Prevalence (
147   II,     5.  6.  3    |     progression of radiographic OA (Table 5.6.4). Almost everyone
148   II,     5.  6.  3    |           factors are summarised in table 5.6.5.~ ~Table 5.6.5. Risk
149   II,     5.  6.  3    |        summarised in table 5.6.5.~ ~Table 5.6.5. Risk factors for
150   II,     5.  6.  3    |       decline (Linos et al, 1980). (Table 5.6.6)~ ~Table 5.6.6. Prevalence
151   II,     5.  6.  3    |              1980). (Table 5.6.6)~ ~Table 5.6.6. Prevalence and incidence
152   II,     5.  6.  3    |            or more is considerable (Table 5.6.7).~ ~Table 5.6.7. Estimated
153   II,     5.  6.  3    |       considerable (Table 5.6.7).~ ~Table 5.6.7. Estimated lifetime
154   II,     5.  6.  3    |          those more likely to fall (Table 5.6.8) and those who may
155   II,     5.  6.  3    |             be at risk of fracture (Table 5.6.9). There are some semi-independent
156   II,     5.  6.  3    |     spontaneously (Melton, 1995).~ ~Table 5.6.8. Risk Factors for
157   II,     5.  6.  3    |            Falling in the Elderly~ ~Table 5.6.9. Risk factors for
158   II,     5.  6.  3    |          years (Kanis et al, 2002) (Table 5.6.10).~ ~Table 5.6.10.
159   II,     5.  6.  3    |             2002) (Table 5.6.10).~ ~Table 5.6.10. Estimated 10 year
160   II,     5.  6.  4    |           had rheumatoid arthritis (Table 5.6.11).~ ~Table 5.6.11.
161   II,     5.  6.  4    |         arthritis (Table 5.6.11).~ ~Table 5.6.11. Distribution (in
162   II,     5.  6.  4    |             the most common reason (Table 5.6.12). (European Commission (
163   II,     5.  6.  4    |          Problems and Conditions)~ ~Table 5.6.12. Distribution (in
164   II,     5.  7.  1    |           available GFR cut-offs.~ ~Table 5.7.1. KDIGO Definition
165   II,     5.  7.  1    |       without kidney damage~ ~ ~ ~ ~Table 5.7.2. Current CKD Classification
166   II,     5.  7.  3    |             was 7.1 patients pmarp (Table 5.7.3).~ ~Adults~ ~CKD incidence
167   II,     5.  7.  3    |           patients pmp in Portugal (Table 5.7.4 and Table 5.7.5).
168   II,     5.  7.  3    |           Portugal (Table 5.7.4 and Table 5.7.5). Just like prevalence,
169   II,     5.  7.  3    |           in males than in females (Table 5.7.3). Whereas incidence
170   II,     5.  7.  3    |            rate of diabetic ESRD.~ ~Table 5.7.3. Incidence of RRT
171   II,     5.  7.  3    |           cause of renal failure.~ ~Table 5.7.4. Incidence of RRT
172   II,     5.  7.  3    |           2005 period per country~ ~Table 5.7.5. Incidence of RRT
173   II,     5.  7.  3    |         increased by more than 50% (Table 5.7.3). This was primarily
174   II,     5.  7.  3    |         disproportionally affected (Table 5.7.7), may depend on the
175   II,     5.  7.  3    |             age related population (Table 5.7.7).~ ~Adults~ ~The prevalence
176   II,     5.  7.  3    |          males compared to females (Table 5.7.7). Prevalence of RRT
177   II,     5.  7.  3    |             System, USRDS ,2007).~ ~Table 5.7.6A. Prevalence of RRT
178   II,     5.  7.  3    |             1992-2005 by country.~ ~Table 5.7.6B. Prevalence of RRT
179   II,     5.  7.  3    |             2000-2005 by country.~ ~Table 5.7.7. Prevalence of RRT
180   II,     5.  7.  3    |          over the period 1992-2005 (Table 5.7.7) the overall adjusted
181   II,     5.  7.  3    |          years of age respectively (Table 5.7.8). Five-year mortality
182   II,     5.  7.  3    |     progress (Young et al, 2000).~ ~Table 5.7.8. 90-day, one-, two-
183   II,     5.  7.  3    |         disproportionally affected (Table 5.7.7), may depend on the
184   II,     5.  8.  2    |        asthma (Viegi et al 2004).~ ~Table 5.8.2.1. ICD10 Codes for
185   II,     5.  8.  3    |           more than four estimates (Table 5.8.1)~ ~Table 5.8.1. Prevalence
186   II,     5.  8.  3    |           estimates (Table 5.8.1)~ ~Table 5.8.1. Prevalence estimates
187   II,     5.  8.  3    |        disease, pulmonary embolism (Table 5.8.2).~ ~Table 5.8.2. Incidence
188   II,     5.  8.  3    |           embolism (Table 5.8.2).~ ~Table 5.8.2. Incidence of comorbidities
189   II,     5.  9.  3    |         East Germany, Australia).~ ~Table 5.9.1. Summary of data on
190   II,     5.  9.  3    |           in prevalence of asthma~ ~Table 5.9.2. Summary of data on
191   II,     5.  9.  3    |           in prevalence of asthma~ ~Table 5.9.3. Summary of studies
192   II,     5.  9.  4    |            ragweed pollen counts.~ ~Table 5.9.4. Highest, median and
193   II,     5.  9.  4    |           assessed by skin tests.~ ~Table 5.9.5. High or low prevalence
194   II,     5.  9.  4    |        Parietaria; w1, ragweed.~ ~ ~Table 5.9.6. Standardized (age,
195   II,     5. 10.  2    |          for a variety of purposes (Table 1). These include molecular
196   II,     5. 10.  2    |              Brusic et al, 2003).~ ~Table 5.10.1. Available allergen
197   II,     5. 10.  2    |    dermatitis due to ingested food (Table 2).~ ~Table 5.10.2. ICD
198   II,     5. 10.  2    |          ingested food (Table 2).~ ~Table 5.10.2. ICD codes presumed
199   II,     5. 10.  5    |           of the allergenic source (Table 5.10.1). Alcoholic beverages
200   II,     5. 10.  5    |          reactions to foodstuffs.~ ~Table 5.10.3. List of food ingredients/
201   II,     5. 10.  5    |            exempted form labelling (Table 5.10.1). It is to note that
202   II,     5. 11.  3    |         Tables 5.11.1 and 5.11.2.~ ~Table 5.11.1. Prevalence of selected
203   II,     5. 11.  3    |        Dermatol 2006;16:212-218~ ~ ~Table 5.11.2. Prevalence of examined
204   II,     5. 11.  3    |      incidence, especially of NMSC (Table 5.11.3).~ ~Table 5.11.3.
205   II,     5. 11.  3    |           of NMSC (Table 5.11.3).~ ~Table 5.11.3. Age-standardized
206   II,     5. 12.  3    |             5.12.2 (A and B).~ ~ ~ ~Table 5.12.1 gives the age-standardized
207   II,     5. 12.  3    |            changes in percentage.~ ~Table 5.12.1. Age-adjusted (world
208   II,     5. 12.  3    |           women from all countries (Table 5.12.2), but trends were
209   II,     5. 12.  3    |            around 24-30/100,000).~ ~Table 5.12.2. Age-adjusted (world
210   II,     5. 12.  3    |     European countries are given in Table 5.12.3 for men and in Table
211   II,     5. 12.  3    |         Table 5.12.3 for men and in Table 5.12.4 for women. Given
212   II,     5. 12.  3    |            in women from Ireland.~ ~Table 5.12.3. Joinpoint regression
213   II,     5. 12.  3    |     EUGLOREH countries, 1970-2002~ ~Table 5.12.4. Joinpoint regression
214   II,     5. 14.  3    |             decay severity (DMFT). (Table 5.14.1). For instance, the
215   II,     5. 14.  3    |             Denmark is 1.0 DMF-T.~ ~Table 5.14.1. Dental Health in
216   II,     6.  3.  1    |        diseases under surveillance (Table 6.1). Of the 49 diseases,
217   II,     6.  3.  1    |      influenza, AMR and malaria).~ ~Table 6.1. Summary of general
218   II,     6.  3.  4    |  Tuberculosis Annual Report~ ~ ~ ~ ~Table 6.A1.1 Number of cases of
219   II,     6.  3.  4    |            cases (Sweden smear)~ ~ ~Table 6.A1.2 Cases of TB between
220   II,     6.  3.  4    |         between 1995 and 2004~ ~ ~ ~Table 6.A1.3 Cases of TB by age
221   II,     7.  3.  1    |     Injuries~ ~The figures given in Table 7.1 are based on a data
222   II,     7.  3.  1    |           view of injuries (CVI) in Table 7.1. Comprehensive view
223   II,     7.  3.  1    |          for injury surveillance.~ ~Table 7.1. Comprehensive view
224   II,     7.  3.  2    |   comprehensive view of injuries in Table 7.1, fatal injuries are
225   II,     7.  3.  2    |            system claim more lives (Table 7.2. Leading cause of death
226   II,     7.  3.  2    |             per age group, EU27).~ ~Table 7.2. Leading cause of death
227   II,     7.  3.  3    |    inpatients treated for injuries (Table 7.3).~ ~Table 7.3. Hospital
228   II,     7.  3.  3    |             injuries (Table 7.3).~ ~Table 7.3. Hospital discharge
229   II,     7.  3.  5    |        medically treated cases (See Table 7.1).~ ~Suicide and self
230   II,     7.  4.  1    |          all young people’s deaths (Table 7.2. Leading cause of death
231   II,     7.  4.  5    |         leisure and sportsdomain (Table 7.1) and that in most home,
232   II,     8.  1.  3    |             and women aged 16-64.~ ~Table 8.1. Proportion of people
233   II,     8.  2.  2    |            and Candidate Countries (Table 8.2) due to different assumptions
234   II,     8.  2.  2    |           in Murray et al, 2001).~ ~Table 8.2. Prevalence of blindness
235   II,     8.  2.  2    |        cataract in EUR-B countries (Table 8.3). Glaucoma and diabetic
236   II,     8.  2.  2    |           in developed countries.~ ~Table 8.3. Causes of blindness
237   II,     8.  2.  2    |            and Candidate Countries (Table 8.2) due to different assumptions
238   II,     8.  2.  2    |           in Murray et al, 2001).~ ~Table 8.2. Prevalence of blindness
239   II,     8.  2.  2    |        cataract in EUR-B countries (Table 8.3). Glaucoma and diabetic
240   II,     8.  2.  2    |           in developed countries.~ ~Table 8.3. Causes of blindness
241   II,     8.  2.  3    |        performance are presented in Table 8.4. Available data have
242   II,     8.  2.  3    |             H90-H91) (WHO, 2002).~ ~Table 8.4. WHO grades of hearing
243   II,     8.  2.  3    |       results obtained are shown in Table 8.5. An additional study
244   II,     8.  2.  3    |      estimated to be 0.1 to 0.2%.~ ~Table 8.5. Estimated prevalence
245   II,     9            |       Tables from 9.1.a to 9.1.d.~ ~Table 9.1a. Main risk factors
246   II,     9            |       listed in Chapter 9.1.1~ ~ ~ ~Table 9.1b. Main risk factors
247   II,     9            |            References cited in this table are listed in Chapter 9.
248   II,     9            |           listed in Chapter 9.2~ ~ ~Table 9.1c. Main risk factors
249   II,     9            |            References cited in this table are listed in Chapter 9.
250   II,     9            |         listed in Chapter 9.3.1~ ~ ~Table 9.1d. Main risk factors
251   II,     9            |            References cited in this table are listed in Chapter 9.
252   II,     9.  1.  1    |             among EU Member States. Table 9.1.1.1 provides definitions
253   II,     9.  1.  1    |          countries and over time.~ ~Table 9.1.1.1. Definitions of
254   II,     9.  1.  1    |             as neonatal mortality~ ~Table 9.1.1.2. Births, deaths
255   II,     9.  1.  1    | EURO-PERISTAT indicators, listed in Table 1, were developed after
256   II,     9.  1.  1    |             in the member states.~ ~Table 9.1.1.2.1. EURO-PERISTAT
257   II,     9.  1.  1    |       Reproduction and Embryology). Table 9. 1. 1. 2. 1 indicates
258   II,     9.  1.  1    |     neonatal and infant mortality~ ~Table 9.1.1.2 provides rates of
259   II,     9.  1.  1    |          mortality, as explained in Table 9.1.1.1. In addition, data
260   II,     9.  1.  1    |           the first year of life.~ ~Table 9.1.1.3. Infant mortality
261   II,     9.  1.  1    |            live births. As shown in Table 9.1.1.4, this rate varies
262   II,     9.  1.  1    |             2.3 (United Kingdom).~ ~Table 9.1.1.4. Cerebral palsy
263   II,     9.  1.  1    |             impairment. As shown in Table 9.1.1.5, these proportions
264   II,     9.  1.  1    |          time in this rate of CP.~ ~Table 9.1.1.5. Proportion of severe
265   II,     9.  1.  1    |       period 1990-1998. As shown in Table 9.1.1.6, this rate varies
266   II,     9.  1.  1    |        1499g (Platt et al, 2007).~ ~Table 9.1.1.6. CP rates among
267   II,     9.  1.  1    |             available knowledge see Table 9.1 and the section on maternal
268   II,     9.  1.  2    |      registers in 20 countries (see Table 9.1.2.2.1), covering in
269   II,     9.  1.  2    |             participate in EUROCAT (Table 1), as well as the Ukraine
270   II,     9.  1.  2    |          full membership in 2009.~ ~Table 9.1.2.2.1. Coverage of the
271   II,     9.  1.  2    |            each country is shown in Table 1, ranging among those countries
272   II,     9.  1.  2    |           000 births for 2000-2004 (Table 9.1.2.1). Total prevalence
273   II,     9.  1.  2    |            19.9 per 1 000 births.~ ~Table 9.1.2.1. Prevalence per
274   II,     9.  1.  2    |     subgroups in Europe is shown in Table 9.1.2.1. The prevalence
275   II,     9.  1.  2    |        births. In the data shown in Table 9.1.2.1, these cases have
276   II,     9.  1.  2    |             000 births are shown in Table 9.1.2.1.~ ~There has been
277   II,     9.  1.  2    |           of 0.99 per 1 000 births (Table 9.1.2.2). The main congenital
278   II,     9.  1.  2    |        chromosomal anomalies (21%) (Table 9.1.2.2).~ ~Chromosomal
279   II,     9.  1.  2    |       equally in both categories.~ ~Table 9.1.2.2. Perinatal mortality
280   II,     9.  1.  2    |         anomaly varies per country (Table 9.1.2.3). The lowest rates
281   II,     9.  1.  2    |            mortality statistics).~ ~Table 9.1.2.3. Ratio of Terminations
282   II,     9.  1.  2    |       Norway, Portugal, Denmark).~ ~Table 9.1.2.3 shows TOPFA before
283   II,     9.  1.  2    |            with congenital anomaly (Table 9.1.2.3). Up to 0.8% (Switzerland)
284   II,     9.  1.  2    |           record a rate above 0.5% (Table 9.1.2.3). The differences
285   II,     9.  1.  2    |            is 6.1 per 1 000 births (Table 9.1.2.1), the largest group
286   II,     9.  1.  2    |            in Ireland and Malta).~ ~Table 9.1.2.4. Total and live
287   II,     9.  1.  2    |            1.0 per 1 000 in Poland (Table 9.1.2.4).~ ~Orofacial clefts~ ~
288   II,     9.  1.  2    |             1 000 births in Europe (Table 9.1.2.1). Cleft lip with
289   II,     9.  1.  2    |            000 births in 2000-2004 (Table 9.1.2.1). It is associated
290   II,     9.  1.  2    |            of 1.3 per 1 000 births (Table 9.1.2.1). Individual registries
291   II,     9.  1.  2    |           For main risk factors see Table 9.1a.~ ~Table 9.1a. Main
292   II,     9.  1.  2    |           factors see Table 9.1a.~ ~Table 9.1a. Main risk factors
293   II,     9.  1.  2    |   prevention have been presented in Table 9.1a. The following would
294   II,     9.  2.  2    |         indicators are published as Table 6 of the report as far as
295   II,     9.  2.  4    |            for children health (see Table 9.1b.). Equally important -
296   II,     9.  2.  4    |       policies and legislation.~ ~ ~Table 9.1b. Main risk factors
297   II,     9.  2.  4    |            References cited in this table are listed in Chapter 9.
298   II,     9.  3.  1    |           and injury and poisoning (Table 9.3.1.1). For men who survive
299   II,     9.  3.  1    |            smaller than at birth.~ ~Table 9.3.1.1 Premature mortality
300   II,     9.  3.  1    |            adults are summarized in Table 9.1c.~ ~Table 9.1c. Main
301   II,     9.  3.  1    |         summarized in Table 9.1c.~ ~Table 9.1c. Main risk factors
302   II,     9.  3.  1    |            References cited in this table are listed in Chapter 9.
303   II,     9.  3.  2    |             available knowledge see Table 9.1a.~ ~The EURO-PERISTAT
304   II,     9.  3.  2    |          women of reproductive age (Table 9.1a) using data from EUROSTAT,
305   II,     9.  3.  2    |         between EU Member States.~ ~Table 9.3.2.1. Percentage of babies
306   II,     9.  4.  2    |           supporting this theory.~ ~Table 9.4.1. General Physical
307   II,     9.  4.  3    |             for falls are listed in Table 4.1. These difficulties
308   II,     9.  4.  3    |              estimates for 1996).~ ~Table 9.4.2. Most common causes
309   II,     9.  4.  4    |           elderly are summarized in Table 9.1d.~ ~Table 9.1d. Main
310   II,     9.  4.  4    |         summarized in Table 9.1d.~ ~Table 9.1d. Main risk factors
311   II,     9.  4.  4    |            References cited in this table are listed in Chapter 9.
312   II,     9.  5.  3    |          isolation (Doyal, 1998).~ ~Table 9.5.1. Sex differences in
313   II,     9.  5.  3    |      greater longevity of women~ ~ ~Table 9.5.2. Prevalence of depression
314   II,     9.  5.  3    |           epidemiological studies~ ~Table 9.5.3. Suicide Rates~ ~Gender
315   II,     9.  5.  3    |         similar (Eurostat, 2006).~ ~Table 9.5.4. Percentage of 25-
316   II,     9.  5.  3    |            sources, are reported in Table 9.5.5.~ ~Table 9.5.5. Violence
317   II,     9.  5.  3    |          reported in Table 9.5.5.~ ~Table 9.5.5. Violence against
318   II,     9.  5.  3    |    respectively (Jernigan, 2001).~ ~Table 9.5.6 below illustrates
319   II,     9.  5.  3    |            in the UK and Ireland.~ ~Table 9.5.6. Drinking patterns
320   II,     9.  5.  3    |          related health problems.~ ~Table 9.5.7. Percentage of Female
321   II,     9.  5.  3    |        physical activity at work.~ ~Table 9.5.8. Days of vigorous
322   II,     9.  5.  3    |            last 7 days per gender~ ~Table 9.5.9. Time spent on vigorous
323   II,     9.  5.  4    |        Control tools and policies~ ~Table 9.5.10. European Parliament
324  III,    10.  1        |           10.1.2 and, together with Table 10.1.1, by Figure 10.1.3.~ ~ ~ ~
325  III,    10.  1        |   determinants and human beings~ ~ ~Table 10.1.1. Health determinants:
326  III,    10.  1        |           the case of cancer/EMF.~ ~Table 10.1.2. Major health impacts
327  III,    10.  2.  1    |          leading causes of death.~ ~Table 10.2.1.1.1. Diseases caused
328  III,    10.  2.  1    |            asterisk, suggestive~ ~ ~Table 10.2.1.1.2. Diseases and
329  III,    10.  2.  1    |             smoking is presented in Table 10.2.1.1.3., for the main
330  III,    10.  2.  1    |       diseases for the year 2000.~ ~Table 10.2.1.1.3. Deaths from
331  III,    10.  2.  1    |      described by the World Bank.~ ~Table 10.2.1.1.4. Selected EUGLOREH
332  III,    10.  2.  1    |       during the previous 12 months Table 10.2.1.2.1. The proportion
333  III,    10.  2.  1    |             at least once a week.~ ~Table 10.2.1.2.1. Frequency of
334  III,    10.  2.  1    |    adversely affected by alcohol.~ ~Table 10.2.1.2.2. Change in death
335  III,    10.  2.  1    |     consumption~ ~As can be seen in Table 10.2.1.2.2, there are significant
336  III,    10.  2.  1    |      surveys have been presented in Table 10.2.3.1.~ ~Table 10.2.1.
337  III,    10.  2.  1    |      presented in Table 10.2.3.1.~ ~Table 10.2.1.3.1. Conservative
338  III,    10.  2.  1    |        related to the use of drugs (Table 10.2.1.3.2).~ ~Table 10.
339  III,    10.  2.  1    |         drugs (Table 10.2.1.3.2).~ ~Table 10.2.1.3.2Problem Drug
340  III,    10.  2.  1(15)|                                 See Table DRD-2 (i), Table DRD-3 and
341  III,    10.  2.  1(15)|                See Table DRD-2 (i), Table DRD-3 and Table DRD-4 in
342  III,    10.  2.  1(15)|          DRD-2 (i), Table DRD-3 and Table DRD-4 in the 2007 statistical
343  III,    10.  2.  1    |           Gherunpong et al, 2006)~ ~Table 10.2.1.5.1 illustrates the
344  III,    10.  2.  1    |       Honkala and Rimpelä, 2007).~ ~Table 10.2.1.5.1. Children Daily
345  III,    10.  2.  1    |           affects most adolescents (Table 10.2.5.1) and 40 to 50%
346  III,    10.  2.  1    |             Managers is reported in Table 10.2.1.7.0.~ ~Table 10.2.
347  III,    10.  2.  1    |     reported in Table 10.2.1.7.0.~ ~Table 10.2.1.7.0 Preliminary information
348  III,    10.  2.  1    |           food items is reported in table 10.2.1.7.1 whereas the gross
349  III,    10.  2.  1    |           in EU15, 2002 (1 000 t)~ ~Table 10.2.1.7.1. Gross human
350  III,    10.  2.  1    |           cereals, 2004 (1 000 t)~ ~Table 10.2.1.7.2. Gross human
351  III,    10.  2.  1    |         consumption of meat, 2003~ ~Table 10.2.1.7.3. Gross human
352  III,    10.  2.  1    |            fruits, 2004 (1 000 t)~ ~Table 10.2.1.7.4. Gross human
353  III,    10.  2.  1    |             surveys are reported in Table 10.2.1.7.5.~ ~Table 10.2.
354  III,    10.  2.  1    |     reported in Table 10.2.1.7.5.~ ~Table 10.2.1.7.5. DAFNE average
355  III,    10.  2.  1    |          compared to WHO/FAO goals (table 10.2.1.7.7), there is little
356  III,    10.  2.  1    |           and wholemeal products.~ ~Table 10.2.1.7.6. Comparisons
357  III,    10.  3.  1    |           of physical risk factors (table 10.3.1.1). Physical work
358  III,    10.  3.  1    |            or moving heavy loads.~ ~Table 10.3.1.1. Self-reported
359  III,    10.  3.  2    |           of all exports in 2004.~ ~Table 10.3.2.1. Some industrial
360  III,    10.  3.  2    |          industrial applications.~ ~Table 10.3.2.2. Platinum group
361  III,    10.  3.  2    |             Rhine and tributaries~ ~Table 10.3.2.2 shows levels of
362  III,    10.  3.  2    |       including flame retardants.~ ~Table 10.3.2.3 below overviews
363  III,    10.  3.  2    |         very difficult to assess.~ ~Table 10.3.2.3 . Major health
364  III,    10.  3.  2    |          much of the information in Table 10.3.2.3. is based on observations
365  III,    10.  3.  3    |          segments and risk groups) (table 10.3.3.1).~ ~Table 10.3.
366  III,    10.  3.  3    |         groups) (table 10.3.3.1).~ ~Table 10.3.3.1. Summary of general
367  III,    10.  3.  4    |             the impacts these have (Table 10.3.4.1). Finally, it highlights
368  III,    10.  3.  4    |         control and policy tools.~ ~Table 10.3.4.1. Global trends
369  III,    10.  3.  4    |            Extreme weather events~ ~Table 10.3.4.2 gives an overview
370  III,    10.  3.  4    |             affected most people.~ ~Table 10.3.4.2. Deaths and damage
371  III,    10.  4.  1    |            values and limit values (Table 10.4.1.1).~ ~Table 10.4.
372  III,    10.  4.  1    |          values (Table 10.4.1.1).~ ~Table 10.4.1.1. Guidelines, target
373  III,    10.  4.  1    |             serious health impacts. Table 10.4.1.2 here below describes
374  III,    10.  4.  1    |      current legislation in 2020.~ ~Table 10.4.1.2. Estimated health
375  III,    10.  4.  1    |             et al and re-analyses~ ~Table 10.4.1.3. The CAFE analysis
376  III,    10.  4.  2    |            food chain "from farm to table";~· greater integration
377  III,    10.  4.  2    |             can be present in food (Table 10.4.2.1), in particular
378  III,    10.  4.  2    |           associated with zoonoses (Table 10.4.2.2). In humans, the
379  III,    10.  4.  2    |             threatening conditions (Table 10.4.2.3 The infection can
380  III,    10.  4.  2    |           risks to public health.~ ~Table 10.4.2.1. Association of
381  III,    10.  4.  2    |     Hepatitis E virus~ ~ ~Pig~ ~ ~ ~Table 10.4.2.2. Zoonotic diseases
382  III,    10.  4.  2    |          Wildilife~Source: EFSA~ ~ ~Table 10.4.2.3. Disease symptoms
383  III,    10.  4.  2    |          prevalence was apparent in table eggs over the last 5 years.~·
384  III,    10.  4.  2    |            as contaminants in feed (Table 10.4.2.4). With respect
385  III,    10.  4.  2    |             European countries.~ ~ ~Table 10.4.2.4. Not naturally
386  III,    10.  4.  2    |        impact on consumer’s health (Table 10.4.2.5).~ ~Nitrates~ ~
387  III,    10.  4.  2    |          cooking (EFSA, 2007b).~ ~ ~Table 10.4.2.5. Naturally occurring,
388  III,    10.  4.  2    |            food chain, from farm to table.~ ~EFSA is also proactive
389  III,    10.  4.  2    |          for exports into the EU.~ ~Table 10.4.2.6. FVO Inspection
390  III,    10.  4.  2    |           European Member States.~ ~Table 10.4.2.7. Food safety competent
391  III,    10.  4.  5    |             groundwater in Europe~ ~Table 10.4.5.2.1. Overview of
392  III,    10.  4.  5    |     chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHC) (Table 10.4.5.2.1). Mineral oil
393  III,    10.  5.  2    |             Reilly et al., 2007).~ ~Table 10.5.2.1. Variations in
394  III,    10.  5.  2    |           by urbanization levels:~ ~Table 10.5.2.2. Percentage and
395  III,    10.  5.  2    |    less-developed EU countries.~ ~ ~Table 10.5.2.3. Problems accessing
396  III,    10.  5.  3    |            least once in 12 months (Table 10.5.3.1). This results
397  III,    10.  5.  3    |             health & social work.~ ~Table 10.5.3.1. Absence from work
398  III,    10.  5.  3    |  additionally to 1900 fatal events (table 10.5.3.2). The incidence
399  III,    10.  5.  3    |             carpal tunnel syndrome (Table 10.5.3.3).~Economic sectors
400  III,    10.  5.  3    |           by occupational diseases (table 10.5.3.4). A top incidence
401  III,    10.  5.  3    |           of app. 60 per 100,000.~ ~Table 10.5.3.2. Number and incident
402  III,    10.  5.  3    |            occupational diseases.~ ~Table 10.5.3.3. Number of non
403  III,    10.  5.  3    |   occupational diseases by ICD10.~ ~Table 10.5.3.4. Number and incident
404  III,    10.  5.  3    |           work (serious accidents) (Table 10.5.3.5) and accidents
405  III,    10.  5.  3    |     accidents see also Chapter 7.~ ~Table 10.5.3.5. Incidence of work
406  III,    10.  5.  3    |            peak in the year 2000.~ ~Table 10.5.3.6 gives time trends
407  III,    10.  5.  3    |            across economic sectors. Table 10.5.3.7 points to especially
408  III,    10.  5.  3    |      accidents at work increased.~ ~Table 10.5.3.6. Change in the
409  III,    10.  5.  3    |      employment from 1994 to 2004~ ~Table 10.5.3.7. Standardised incidence
410  III,    10.  5.  3    |         risk because of their work (table 10.5.3.8). This perceived
411  III,    10.  5.  3    |       fatigue, stress and headache (table 10.5.3.9). There seems to
412  III,    10.  5.  3    |           difference between sexes. Table 10.5.3.10 finally gives
413  III,    10.  5.  3    |             impact of their work.~ ~Table 10.5.3.8. Perceived impact
414  III,    10.  5.  3    |             on health per country~ ~Table 10.5.3.9. Perceived impact
415  III,    10.  5.  3    |           on health per symptoms.~ ~Table 10.5.3.10. Perceived work-related
416  III,    10.  5.  3    |             so with men than women (table 10.5.3.11). About 40% of
417  III,    10.  5.  3    |   monotonous or repetitive tasks.~ ~Table 10.5.3.11. Work organisational
418  III,    10.  5.  3    |      manufacturing and agriculture (table 10.5.3.12). A lack of job
419  III,    10.  5.  3    |      transport and communication.~ ~Table 10.5.3.12. Work organisational
420  III,    10.  5.  3    |           of physical risk factors (table 10.5.3.13). Exposures to
421  III,    10.  5.  3    |            to the economic sectors (table 10.5.3.14). Especially employees
422  III,    10.  5.  3    |             all the working time.~ ~Table 10.5.3.13. Physical risks
423  III,    10.  5.  3    |       factors at work per gender.~ ~Table 10.5.3.14. Physical risks
424  III,    10.  6.  1    |        social support categories.~ ~Table 10.6.1. Social support by
425  III,    10.  6.  2    |           lower educational groups (Table 10.6.2.1).~ ~Table 10.6.
426  III,    10.  6.  2    |          groups (Table 10.6.2.1).~ ~Table 10.6.2.1. Odds Ratio Chronic
427   IV,    11.  1.  3    |             500 per capita in 2004 (table 11.1). Luxembourg spends
428   IV,    11.  1.  3    |           per capita at US$4,603.~ ~Table 11.1. Private and Public
429   IV,    11.  1.  5    |            part of the variation.~ ~Table 11.2. Perceived quality
430   IV,    11.  1.  6    |          these negative incentives. Table 11.3 shows the physician
431   IV,    11.  1.  6    |             physicians in Europe.~ ~Table 11.3. Physician payment
432   IV,    11.  1.  6    |           as a form of payment (see Table 11.3). While DRGs are a
433   IV,    11.  2.  1    |             al, 2004), and below.~ ~Table 11.4. Number of outpatient
434   IV,    11.  2.  1    |          decline in most countries (Table 11.5). The exceptions are
435   IV,    11.  2.  1    |           increase was seen.~ ~F ~ ~Table 11.5. Number of psychiatric
436   IV,    11.  3.  1    |            and financial reasons.~ ~Table 11.6. Numbers of practising
437   IV,    11.  3.  2    |         system. Indeed, as shown in Table 11.7, the growth in spending
438   IV,    11.  3.  2    |              in the Czech Republic (Table 11.7).~ ~Additionally, while
439   IV,    11.  3.  2    |            and Turkey (HFA 2007).~ ~Table 11.7. Spending on pharmaceuticals
440   IV,    11.  3.  2    |            or company agreements.~ ~Table 11.8. Contribution of European
441   IV,    11.  6.  1    |             and Mossialos, 1999).~ ~Table 11.9. Total health care
442   IV,    11.  6.  1    |      percentage of GDP, 1990-2004~ ~Table 11.10. Total health care
443   IV,    11.  6.  2    |       degree of public expenditure. Table 11.11 shows that the public
444   IV,    11.  6.  2    |           OECD Health data 2006).~ ~Table 11.11. Public expenditure
445   IV,    11.  6.  2    |            and Latvia). As shown in Table 11.12, the countries with
446   IV,    11.  6.  2    |          private insurance funds.~ ~Table 11.12. Financing mix separated
447   IV,    11.  6.  2    |   individuals and are summarized in Table 11.13. Also in some countries,
448   IV,    11.  6.  2    |    Foubister and Mossialos 2008).~ ~Table 11.13. Examples for cost
449   IV,    11.  6.  4    |             health insurance funds (Table 11.14), the resources generated
450   IV,    11.  6.  4    |           van de Ven et al 2007).~ ~Table 11.14. Collection and allocation
451   IV,    12.  1        |           initiatives in the field (Table 12.1). Even today, public
452   IV,    12.  1        |          Member State competence.~ ~Table 12.1. Healthrelated precursor
453   IV,    12.  1        |           health” (Article 152(1)) (Table 12.2). Whilst the Amsterdam
454   IV,    12.  1        |           health is not surprising (Table 12.2).~ ~Table 12.2. EU
455   IV,    12.  1        |          surprising (Table 12.2).~ ~Table 12.2. EU Treaty Articles
456   IV,    12.  1        |            half a billion citizens (Table 12.3). Prevention has the
457   IV,    12.  1        |          and public expectations.~ ~Table 12.3. Some examples highlighting
458   IV,    12.  1        |       provisions of the Treaty (see Table 12.3), related to the movement
459   IV,    12.  2        |             Tables 12.4 and 12.5.~ ~Table 12.4. Policies and control
460   IV,    12.  2        |            starting in 2007. ~ ~ ~ ~Table 12.5. Policies and control
461   IV,    12.  4        | directorates other than D.G. SANCO (Table 12.6).~ ~Table 12.6. Health
462   IV,    12.  4        |          D.G. SANCO (Table 12.6).~ ~Table 12.6. Health across the
463   IV,    12.  4        |           for health policy makers (Table 12.7). Working as technical
464   IV,    12.  4        |            was established in 2006.~Table 12.7. Community agencies
465   IV,    12.  4        |           for health is provided in Table 12.8.~ ~ ~Table 12.8. Financial
466   IV,    12.  4        |         provided in Table 12.8.~ ~ ~Table 12.8. Financial community
467   IV,    12.  5        |            built on multiple lines (Table 12.9).~ ~Table 12.9. Actions
468   IV,    12.  5        |      multiple lines (Table 12.9).~ ~Table 12.9. Actions referred to
469   IV,    12.  8        |             15 to 27 member States (Table 12.10) started in the health
470   IV,    12.  8        |       country in December 2005.~ ~ ~Table 12.10. The 27 European Union
471   IV,    13.  1        |              for mortality data see Table 13.3). Large differences
472   IV,    13.  1        |           different EU countries.~ ~Table 13.1. Standardised Death
473   IV,    13.  2.  2    |            health loss.~ ~A summary table of the results of the global
474   IV,    13.  2.  2    |             population, EU25, EU15 (Table 13.4).~ ~Table 13.2. Global
475   IV,    13.  2.  2    |          EU25, EU15 (Table 13.4).~ ~Table 13.2. Global burden of disease
476   IV,    13.  2.  2    |      specific diseases are shown in Table 13.5.~ ~ ~Table 13.3. Additional
477   IV,    13.  2.  2    |            shown in Table 13.5.~ ~ ~Table 13.3. Additional estimations
478   IV,    13.  2.  3    |            world range from 2-6%.~ ~Table 13.4. Burden of disease
479   IV,    13.  2.  3    |         first three determinants in Table 13.6 are typically associated
480   IV,    13.  2.  3    |             49 selected conditions. Table 13.7 presents a comparison
481   IV,    13.  2.  3    |            diseases and depression. Table 13.7 also shows that the
482   IV,    13.  2.  3    |            in different people.~ ~ ~Table 13.5. Annual health loss (
483   IV,    13.  2.  3    |          lifestyle factors’ in this table~4. It is assumed here that
484   IV,    13.  2.  4    |      Disease in European countries (Table 13.8).~ ~ ~Table 13.6. WHO
485   IV,    13.  2.  4    |         countries (Table 13.8).~ ~ ~Table 13.6. WHO estimates for
486   IV,    13.  2.  4    |      factors in the European Union (Table 13.6) are smoking, having
487   IV,    13.  2.  4    |           from the data reported in Table 13.6 that these risk factors