Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    -,     1        |          European Union has remarkably increased following the enlargement
  2    I,     2.  1    |            isolated. Globalization has increased travel, especially by air,
  3    I,     2.  1    |       education and training; and (iv) increased savings available for investments
  4    I,     2.  2    |       Continued globalisation, through increased trades, travels, capital
  5    I,     2.  2    |                 Globalization has also increased travel, especially by air,
  6    I,     2.  2    |              of intra-European tourism increased during the process of enlargement.
  7    I,     2.  2    |                 Another effect of this increased travelling is “airport malaria”
  8    I,     2.  3    |         countries its contribution has increased over time. However, it’s
  9    I,     2.  3    |             annual level of 2 million. Increased immigration flows are mainly
 10    I,     2.  4    |              themselves better against increased health risks, and/or have
 11    I,     2.  5    |                areas, job demands have increased, including an intensification
 12    I,     2.  5    |               administrative tasks has increased in professions such as health-care
 13    I,     2.  5    |   participation in decision-making and increased communication with colleagues.
 14    I,     2.  5    |             their health and safety at increased risk, in comparison with
 15    I,     2.  5    |           lifestyle have significantly increased the demand for domestic
 16    I,     2.  5    |         countries its contribution has increased over time. However, it is
 17    I,     2.  5    |           medium-sized enterprises has increased. European figures from Eurostat
 18    I,     2.  5    |               in life expectancy. With increased reliance on funded pensions,
 19    I,     2.  6    |                of women among students increased between 1997/98 and 2003/
 20    I,     2.  6    |             programmes compared to men increased in nearly all countries,
 21    I,     2.  7    |              million; in 2000 they had increased to 411 (18 of which had
 22    I,     2.  8    |         efficiency improvements and an increased use of renewable energy
 23    I,     2.  8    |          improving security of supply.~Increased use of fuel for domestic
 24    I,     2.  8    |              in individual houses. The increased use of renewable energy,
 25    I,     2.  8    |               from nuclear sources has increased. Further major increases
 26    I,     2.  9    |            global mean temperature has increased by 0.8 °C compared with
 27    I,     2.  9    |                mean sea-level rise has increased to 3.1 mm/year in the past
 28    I,     2.  9    |              communities, resulting in increased threats to the ecological
 29    I,     2.  9    |                to project.~ ~Projected increased variations in rainfall pattern
 30    I,     2.  9    |          prolonged drought periods and increased numbers of fires, is already
 31    I,     2.  9    |             already contributing to an increased risk of desertification.
 32    I,     2.  9    |         variability of crop yields has increased as a consequence of extreme
 33    I,     2.  9    |            between sectors and uses.~ ~Increased temperatures can have various
 34    I,     2. 10.  4|                 for example because of increased Internet-based sales through
 35    I,     3.  2    |              relative terms worldwide, increased in absolute terms by about
 36    I,     3.  2    |              relative terms worldwide, increased in absolute terms by about
 37    I,     3.  2    |              the overall EU population increased by about 22%. Increases
 38    I,     3.  2    |               yearly population always increased, several Member States saw
 39    I,     3.  2    |             annual level of 2 million. Increased immigration flows are mainly
 40    I,     3.  3    |               the late 1960s and by an increased life expectancy. In 2004,
 41    I,     3.  3    |             Older workers’ (55-64) has increased overtime, but the variation
 42   II,     4.  1    |           expectancy at birth steadily increased in the EU27, by 3 years
 43   II,     4.  2    |                expectancy at birth has increased, on average, by about 2
 44   II,     4.  2    |                expectancy at birth has increased by 2.3 years per decade
 45   II,     4.  2    |             over time. Life expectancy increased by 1.8 years in the 1970s,
 46   II,     4.  2    |              their fifties and sixties increased in the 1980s and 1990s.~ ~
 47   II,     4.  2    |                rise in life expectancy increased to 50% for both men and
 48   II,     4.  2    |         mortality by traffic accidents increased during the 1980s. In the
 49   II,     4.  2    |               life expectancy at birth increased between 1980 and 2000 due
 50   II,     4.  2    |         countries, life expectancy has increased for the oldest old. In contrast
 51   II,     5.  1.  1|          pylori, is associated with an increased risk of stomach cancer (
 52   II,     5.  1.  1|          Cushing’s disease can lead to increased insulin resistance and diabetes.
 53   II,     5.  1.  1|                been associated with an increased risk of developing dementia,
 54   II,     5.  2.  1|             This paradox relates to an increased longevity and an improved
 55   II,     5.  2.  1|        remained stable or has slightly increased (Kesteloot et al, 2006).
 56   II,     5.  2.  2|           whose prevalence has greatly increased in recent years, are not
 57   II,     5.  2.  3|                per 100.000). Mortality increased by 10% in Eastern Europe (
 58   II,     5.  2.  3|              100.000). Mortality rates increased by 21% in Eastern Europe (
 59   II,     5.  2.  3|           might be mostly explained by increased levels of traditional risk
 60   II,     5.  2.  5|            salt and of salty foods, an increased intake of fruit, vegetables
 61   II,     5.  2.  5|           appropriate changes, such as increased availability of low-fat
 62   II,     5.  2.  6|          levels are associated with an increased risk of stroke, of CHD and
 63   II,     5.  2.  6|                in SBP is associated to increased CVD risk, especially in
 64   II,     5.  2.  6|                5 g (3,8 g) per day, an increased intake of fruit, vegetables,
 65   II,     5.  3.  1|              available, partly because increased occurrence and importance
 66   II,     5.  3.  1|                factors and also due to increased life expectancy at birth (
 67   II,     5.  3.  4|            pylori, is associated to an increased risk of stomach cancer (
 68   II,     5.  3.  5|             testing, which resulted in increased early detection (incidence)
 69   II,     5.  3.  6|             combined, 5-years survival increased from 65% for diagnoses in
 70   II,     5.  3.  6|         survival for colorectal cancer increased from 44% in the period 1986-
 71   II,     5.  3.  6|         survival for the entire Europe increased from 7.5% in men diagnosed
 72   II,     5.  3.  6|         Western European countries has increased (Coleman et al, 2003).~ ~
 73   II,     5.  3.  6|               5-year relative survival increased from 55% in the period 1983–
 74   II,     5.  3.  6|              1985 to 68% in 19921994. Increased survival with time was observed
 75   II,     5.  3.  8|        survival in Europe has strongly increased in recent years (Coleman
 76   II,     5.  3.  8|           prevalent cancer cases (i.e. increased needs of the elderly in
 77   II,     5.  4.  1|              age of 40. Because of the increased prevalence of obesity, the
 78   II,     5.  4.  1|     environmental factors leads to the increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes.
 79   II,     5.  4.  1|               high blood pressure) and increased blood levels of total cholesterol
 80   II,     5.  4.  1|           levels are implicated in the increased risk of complications, affecting
 81   II,     5.  4.  1|        uncontrolled diabetes are at an increased risk of miscarriage and
 82   II,     5.  4.  5|          Cushing’s disease can lead to increased insulin resistance and diabetes.
 83   II,     5.  5.Int|          appropriate medical training, increased social awareness and better
 84   II,     5.  5.Int|         productivity for firms, and an increased risk of unemployment for
 85   II,     5.  5.  1|             retirement and also due to increased mortality for suicide. For
 86   II,     5.  5.  1|          self-harm is associated to an increased risk for future suicidal
 87   II,     5.  5.  1|                  than in men (13%) and increased with age.~ ~Table 5.5.1.
 88   II,     5.  5.  2|       percentage of the population has increased from 1960 to 2005. This
 89   II,     5.  5.  2|                been associated with an increased risk of developing dementia,
 90   II,     5.  5.  2|              and some are experiencing increased sales of their “healthier
 91   II,     5.  5.  3|           prevalence was significantly increased for migrants compared to
 92   II,     5.  5.  3|                in younger ages, and an increased death rate from natural
 93   II,     5.  5.  3|              cause contributing to the increased death rate. The other main
 94   II,     5.  5.  3|        disability pensions, as well as increased reliance on social care
 95   II,     5.  5.  3|           Disorder” in Japan led to an increased rate of diagnosis (Sato,
 96   II,     5.  5.  3|               it is associated with an increased mortality mainly caused
 97   II,     5.  5.  3|           evidence for a substantially increased death rate of people suffering
 98   II,     5.  5.  3|                schizophrenia are at an increased mortality risk compared
 99   II,     5.  5.  3|            mortality had significantly increased over time (Saha et al, 2007).
100   II,     5.  5.  3|             reduced physical activity, increased rate of smoking, etc. –,
101   II,     5.  5.  3|                there is evidence of an increased frequency of diabetes which
102   II,     5.  5.  3|           obese, i.e. a 1.5 to 4 times increased rate compared to community
103   II,     5.  5.  3|         effects (Engl et al, 2006) the increased rate in people affected
104   II,     5.  5.  3|             need to identify people at increased risk and to establish optimal
105   II,     5.  5.  3|       full-blown psychosis is markedly increased (Häfner and Maurer, 2006).~
106   II,     5.  5.  3|         treatment. This may lead to an increased burden of the disease due
107   II,     5.  5.  3|             schizophrenia resulting in increased disability rates.~The efficacy-effectiveness
108   II,     5.  5.  3|               of YLDs averted could be increased by two-thirds – are convincing
109   II,     5.  5.  3|              of disabilities should be increased. The strategy of financial
110   II,     5.  5.  3|               There also appears be an increased frequency of EEG abnormalities
111   II,     5.  5.  3|              developments~ ~Reports of increased prevalence of Autism Spectrum
112   II,     5.  5.  3|               can be attributed to the increased life expectancy (followed
113   II,     5.  5.  3|               CNS disorders) and to an increased ascertainment of the disease
114   II,     5.  5.  3|        epilepsy mostly account for the increased mortality in childhood-onset
115   II,     5.  5.  3|             have been associated to an increased mortality in several studies
116   II,     5.  5.  3|                lobe epilepsy a 25-fold increased risk of suicide (Barraclough,
117   II,     5.  5.  3|           factors may thus explain the increased risk of suicide in patients
118   II,     5.  5.  3|                children with epilepsy. Increased knowledge about epilepsy
119   II,     5.  5.  3|          health care workers should be increased to discuss the problems
120   II,     5.  5.  3|          England and Wales; a markedly increased prevalence up to tenfold
121   II,     5.  5.  3|              assessments over time and increased awareness of MS; and the
122   II,     5.  5.  3|            annual incidence rates have increased significantly from 3 to
123   II,     5.  5.  3|              in Norway over time, with increased proportions of RR- versus
124   II,     5.  5.  3|             population, the prevalence increased 3.5-fold to 73 between 1973
125   II,     5.  5.  3|               in the south. Prevalence increased between 1983 and 1993 in
126   II,     5.  5.  3|               multiple assessments and increased survival. Prevalence and
127   II,     5.  5.  3|               age structure, generally increased life expectancy and previous
128   II,     5.  5.  3|               countries and subsequent increased survival time after MS onset
129   II,     5.  5.  3|            2001), the crude prevalence increased steadily with age; however,
130   II,     5.  5.  3|         pre-levodopa era a significant increased mortality (SMR: 2.9) was
131   II,     5.  5.  3|            Newer studies also found an increased SMR. One Australian study,
132   II,     5.  5.  3|          treatment options for PD have increased in the last thirty years,
133   II,     5.  5.  3|           having a more than threefold increased risk of PD. Tsui et al, (
134   II,     5.  5.  3|              also been associated with increased or decreased Parkinson’s
135   II,     5.  6.  3|                care would have greatly increased the costs related musculoskeletal
136   II,     5.  6.  3|          Danielsson, 1964), leading to increased pain and disability (Dougados
137   II,     5.  6.  3|               months. There is also an increased mortality associated with
138   II,     5.  6.  3|           earlier studies but this has increased considerably with the widespread
139   II,     5.  6.  3|             can identify those at much increased risk of fracture but the
140   II,     5.  6.  3|          impact on quality of life and increased mortality (Woolf and Akesson,
141   II,     5.  6.  3|                also associated with an increased mortality at 5 years as
142   II,     5.  7.  3|               for ESRD in 2005 steeply increased with age and was higher
143   II,     5.  7.  3|              the incidence rate of RRT increased by more than 50% (Table
144   II,     5.  7.  3|            prevalence of stage 3-5 CKD increased with age (Figure 5.7.4).~ ~
145   II,     5.  7.  3|              Tables 5.7.6 A and B). It increased with age and was more than
146   II,     5.  7.  3|             prevalence of RRT for ESRD increased from 480 to 807 patients
147   II,     5.  8.  3|             indicate a steady trend to increased prevalence in Finland, Slovakia,
148   II,     5.  8.  3|               show that COPD mortality increased over that period, while
149   II,     5.  8.  3|                 malignant tumour.~ ~An increased incidence of a number of
150   II,     5.  8.  3|           Jorgensen et al, 2007). This increased prevalence of osteoporosis
151   II,     5.  8.  3|             2004). Moreover, the costs increased in proportion to severity
152   II,     5.  8.  4|           exposures to dusts and fumes increased the risk for chronic bronchitis
153   II,     5.  8.  4|         steeper decline of FEV1 nor an increased prevalence of airway obstruction
154   II,     5.  8.  7|                 and Järvholm B (2004): Increased mortality in COPD among
155   II,     5.  9. FB|             later in childhood, are at increased risk for future asthma.
156   II,     5.  9. FB|            influences. In addition, an increased prevalence of atopy (presence
157   II,     5.  9.  3|              ECRHS) in 199193 and had increased to 18.3% by the end of the
158   II,     5.  9.  3|               decreasing, after having increased for decades. Data on children
159   II,     5.  9.  4|             007). Asthma risk was also increased in participants who reported
160   II,     5.  9.  4|                to the battery of tests increased the overall estimated prevalence
161   II,     5.  9.  4|               symptoms, but that these increased with the time spent in Apulia (
162   II,     5.  9.  4|          prevalence of asthma symptoms increased with the numbers of years
163   II,     5. 10.  3|       frequency may have substantially increased in the last decades in parallel
164   II,     5. 11.  3|        prevalence of atopic eczema has increased two- to three-fold over
165   II,     5. 11.  3|             female university students increased from 13 to 39% during the
166   II,     5. 11.  3|               areas of eroded skin and increased morbidity) when considering
167   II,     5. 11.  3|                 2001). Incidence rates increased substantially in men (by
168   II,     5. 11.  3|               probably be explained by increased cumulative sun exposure
169   II,     5. 11.  3|                 incidence rates of BCC increased by 70.4% in men and 65%
170   II,     5. 11.  3|           while incidence rates of SCC increased by 13.5% in men and 18.8%
171   II,     5. 11.  3|             probably due in part to an increased leisure exposure to the
172   II,     5. 11.  6|                impending crisis of the increased demand for services.~ ~
173   II,     5. 11.  7|               Carriben children are at increased risk of atopic dermatitis.
174   II,     5. 12.  3|               men: Denmark whose rates increased from 11.3 in 1980-82 to
175   II,     5. 13    |              burden on society through increased medical costs to treat the
176   II,     5. 14.  2|                disease slows down with increased age. The disease is mainly
177   II,     5. 14.  3|                disease slows down with increased age. The disease is mainly
178   II,     5. 14.  3|             dental care per individual increased by 1.5 between 1990 and
179   II,     6.  3.  3|              has been observed to have increased again in recent years in
180   II,     6.  3.  3|                incidence in Europe has increased steadily from 7.0 per 100
181   II,     6.  3.  4|                the Baltic States rates increased in the late 1990s, but have
182   II,     6.  3.  4|                 however, overall rates increased substantially between 2001
183   II,     6.  3.  4|         changes in Europe, such as the increased immigration and the upheaval
184   II,     6.  3.  4|                among TB cases has also increased since 2000 in Estonia and
185   II,     6.  3.  4|             incidence of legionellosis increased between 1996 and 2002 in
186   II,     6.  3.  5|          vaccination coverage and even increased it, there have been areas
187   II,     6.  3.  5|               age, the incidence rates increased with age.~ ~ ~Conjugated
188   II,     6.  3.  6|               about the possibility of increased numbers of cases in the
189   II,     7.  4.  3|               achieved in the past and increased efforts for further reduction
190   II,     8.  2.  1|            decades (WHO 2000). Despite increased longevity, people in this
191   II,     8.  2.  1|          problems and, thus, to report increased morbidity and poorer health
192   II,     8.  2.  1|          significant proportion of the increased risk for poorer health and
193   II,     8.  2.  1|            with genderwomen were at increased risk of obesity, for example –
194   II,     8.  2.  3|                  with some evidence of increased prevalence in Italian men
195   II,     9        |               and nulliparas both face increased risks of stillbirth (Canterino
196   II,     9        |               2007b; Magee 2004). This increased risk is mostly due to the
197   II,     9        |               For younger mothers, the increased risk of perinatal mortality
198   II,     9        |            levels of education have an increased risk of premature death
199   II,     9        |              risk of death was further increased for all combinations of
200   II,     9        |               older people needs to be increased in order to reach the international
201   II,     9.  1.  1|             The preterm birth rate has increased in many countries over the
202   II,     9.  1.  1|             births is not rare; it has increased during the last decades
203   II,     9.  1.  2|              live-birth prevalence has increased.~ ~Figure 9.1.2.1. Trends
204   II,     9.  1.  2|               and nulliparas both face increased risks of stillbirth (Canterino
205   II,     9.  1.  2|               2007b; Magee 2004). This increased risk is mostly due to the
206   II,     9.  1.  2|               For younger mothers, the increased risk of perinatal mortality
207   II,     9.  2.  3|              wealthier (UNICEF, 2002). Increased incidence of HIV/AIDS in
208   II,     9.  2.  3|                poor glucose tolerance, increased risk of non-insulin-dependent
209   II,     9.  2.  3|                apnoea, and can lead to increased rates of non-communicable
210   II,     9.  2.  3|             under 20 years of age have increased in many countries over the
211   II,     9.  3.  1|            partially account for men’s increased susceptibility to diseases
212   II,     9.  3.  1|          status. Moreover, men have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease,
213   II,     9.  3.  1|         productivity for firms, and an increased risk of unemployment for
214   II,     9.  3.  1|               that the causes of men’s increased risk are lifestyle related,
215   II,     9.  3.  1|                 which in turn leads to increased morbidity (European Heart
216   II,     9.  3.  1|       cardiovascular disease among men increased from the 15-24 age group (
217   II,     9.  3.  1|             disease carries with it an increased risk for CHD, which is not
218   II,     9.  3.  1|               main causes being:~1. An increased abundance of ‘energy dense’
219   II,     9.  3.  1|               to erectile dysfunction, increased risk of dementia and sleep
220   II,     9.  3.  1|             older, stronger or richer. Increased incidence of HIV/AIDS in
221   II,     9.  3.  1|               conditions, suggest that increased life expectancy does not
222   II,     9.  3.  1|             transition, and may remain increased for several years. A number
223   II,     9.  3.  1|         enhanced bone fragility and an increased fracture risk. Across Europe,
224   II,     9.  3.  1|              factors contribute to the increased incidence of these illnesses
225   II,     9.  3.  1|            levels of education have an increased risk of premature death
226   II,     9.  3.  2|               can also be explained by increased risk factors among pregnant
227   II,     9.  3.  2|             advanced maternal age, the increased proportion of women with
228   II,     9.  3.  2|           manage subfertility) and the increased use of medical technology
229   II,     9.  3.  2|              delivery is associated to increased morbidity among mothers
230   II,     9.  3.  3|                does not appear to have increased throughout the past decade (
231   II,     9.  3.  3|                As a consequence of the increased difference between the age
232   II,     9.  3.  3|               for men and has slightly increased for women from 5.1 to 5.
233   II,     9.  3.  3|           found that after a period of increased safe sex practice, sexual
234   II,     9.  3.  3|             risk reduction strategies, increased self-effectiveness and intention
235   II,     9.  3.  3|          individual behaviour and show increased effectiveness where information
236   II,     9.  3.  3|           Konings E, Paccaud F (1997): Increased condom use without other
237   II,     9.  3.  3|              Weiss HA, Hayes R (2005): Increased condom use at sexual debut
238   II,     9.  4.  1|                quality of life and the increased longevity poses new challenges
239   II,     9.  4.  3|          appropriate medical training, increased social awareness and better
240   II,     9.  4.  3|               the prevalence of stroke increased from 5% in people aged 65
241   II,     9.  4.  3|           gonorrhoea and syphilis have increased by 55 per cent in the UK
242   II,     9.  4.  3|                abrasions which lead to increased susceptibility to STIs (
243   II,     9.  4.  3|               Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) increased in women but not in men.
244   II,     9.  4.  3|                data also suggests that increased life expectancy is not accompanied
245   II,     9.  4.  4|              risk of death was further increased for all combinations of
246   II,     9.  4.  4|               older people needs to be increased in order to reach the international
247   II,     9.  5.  3|           pressure rather than through increased awareness of the issues,
248   II,     9.  5.  3|             the weight of citizens has increased, with the most striking
249   II,     9.  5.  3|          Characteristics associated to increased chances of moving into institutional
250  III,    10.  1    |              radiation~Some pesticides~Increased chemical sensitivity~multiple
251  III,    10.  1.  1|             energy expenditure through increased energy intake. Intense exercise
252  III,    10.  1.  1|                reported, however, that increased levels of activity are associated
253  III,    10.  1.  1|                of alcoholics are at an increased risk of alcoholism in adulthood.
254  III,    10.  1.  1|              problem drinkers is at an increased risk of difficulties related
255  III,    10.  1.  2|               2. Future developments~ ~Increased efforts are necessary in
256  III,    10.  2.  1|               Impaired lung growth and increased risk of respiratory diseases
257  III,    10.  2.  1|    restrictions and low birth weight~- Increased likelihood of developing
258  III,    10.  2.  1|                death syndrome (SIDS)~- Increased rate of respiratory infections~ ~-
259  III,    10.  2.  1|            oral tobacco use include an increased risk of cancer (Boy ). Especially
260  III,    10.  2.  1|              to snuff use, although an increased risk for oral cancer development
261  III,    10.  2.  1|            study, however, reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer
262  III,    10.  2.  1|            increase of blood pressure, increased risk for diabetes, musculoskeletal
263  III,    10.  2.  1|                 could be significantly increased in nearly all countries
264  III,    10.  2.  1|         drinking.~ ~Binge drinking has increased much among young people
265  III,    10.  2.  1|                alcohol) on an occasion increased by 10% between 2003 and
266  III,    10.  2.  1|     Binge-drinking in young people has increased across much of Europe in
267  III,    10.  2.  1|                vehicle crash. The risk increased to at least 6 times with
268  III,    10.  2.  1|               partially reflecting the increased proportional size of a one-litre
269  III,    10.  2.  1|             sales were associated with increased rates of domestic violence
270  III,    10.  2.  1|                studies have found that increased expenditure on advertising
271  III,    10.  2.  1|         advertising is associated with increased alcohol-related harm amongst
272  III,    10.  2.  1|                positive effects on the increased knowledge about alcohol
273  III,    10.  2.  1|           European Union has generally increased in the 1990-ties both for
274  III,    10.  2.  1|              children and young adults increased rapidly along the 90s, ecstasy
275  III,    10.  2.  1|              that illicit drug use has increased during the 90s in almost
276  III,    10.  2.  1|               for primary cannabis use increased in all countries that reported
277  III,    10.  2.  1|             specialised programmes has increased greatly during the past
278  III,    10.  2.  1|       reduction) in Europe has clearly increased over the past two decades.
279  III,    10.  2.  1|              it might be expected, the increased consumption and use of oral
280  III,    10.  2.  1|                parental behaviour. The increased usage of fluoride containing
281  III,    10.  2.  1|              growth was constrained by increased price competition and the
282  III,    10.  2.  1|             its use would seem to have increased substantially over the last
283  III,    10.  2.  1|          effect of fluoride toothpaste increased with higher initial levels
284  III,    10.  2.  1|                This has resulted in an increased categorisation across the
285  III,    10.  2.  1|        behaviours are associated to an increased risk of craniofacial birth
286  III,    10.  2.  1|         classed as physically inactive increased from 35.7% in 1992 to 39.
287  III,    10.  2.  1|              burden on society through increased medical costs to treat the
288  III,    10.  2.  1|               England (UK) the numbers increased from 8% to 20% between 1974
289  III,    10.  2.  1|           Socioeconomic variation~ ~An increased prevalence of overweight
290  III,    10.  2.  1|              income countries, obesity increased sharply as they became more
291  III,    10.  2.  1| hyperhomocysteinaemia associated to an increased risk for cardiovascular
292  III,    10.  2.  1|              Bone density responses to increased physical activity in adults
293  III,    10.  2.  1|          medically contraindicated, an increased physical activity should
294  III,    10.  2.  1|              prevalence in Europe even increased between 1993 and 2003. In
295  III,    10.  2.  1|             and added sugars in foods, increased saturated fat intake, reduced
296  III,    10.  2.  1|           special care. Growth induces increased requirements in many nutrients.
297  III,    10.  2.  1|             and demography, as well as increased urbanisation and industrialisation,
298  III,    10.  2.  1|                Supporting initiatives. Increased EU involvement building
299  III,    10.  2.  2|              is considered a marker of increased risk that should suggest
300  III,    10.  2.  3|            level is associated with an increased risk of stroke, CHD or peripheral
301  III,    10.  2.  3|                in SBP is associated to increased CVD risk, especially in
302  III,    10.  2.  3|                5 g (3,8 g) per day, an increased intake of fruit, vegetables,
303  III,    10.  2.  5|    characteristic of old age, are:~ ~- increased blood levels of free fractions
304  III,    10.  2.  5|         modifications, which induce an increased susceptibility to xenobiotics,
305  III,    10.  3.  1|          population is connected to an increased exposure to UV-radiation.
306  III,    10.  3.  1|                stratosphere has led to increased ground level exposure to
307  III,    10.  3.  1|                years does not pose any increased risk of brain tumour or
308  III,    10.  3.  1|                appear that there is no increased risk for brain tumours in
309  III,    10.  3.  1|        chronically strong annoyance to increased morbidity. Sleep disturbance
310  III,    10.  3.  1|            noise is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Several
311  III,    10.  3.  1|          cardiovascular system such as increased blood pressure and increased
312  III,    10.  3.  1|           increased blood pressure and increased risk of myocardial infarction.
313  III,    10.  3.  2|      production of toxic chemicals has increased at almost the same rate
314  III,    10.  3.  2|      production of toxic chemicals has increased at almost the same rate
315  III,    10.  3.  2|                evident in the light of increased scientific knowledge and
316  III,    10.  3.  2|               exposures is incomplete. Increased consumption leads to increased
317  III,    10.  3.  2|         Increased consumption leads to increased chemical flow and widespread
318  III,    10.  3.  2|              trade in chemicals, which increased by an average of 14% a year
319  III,    10.  3.  2|        production of toxic chemicals25 increased by 23.5%. The substances
320  III,    10.  3.  2|          repro-toxic chemicals (CMR) - increased by 22% (Eurostat, 2006).
321  III,    10.  3.  2|        improved analytical methods and increased knowledge of hazardous properties
322  III,    10.  3.  2|            These peaks were related to increased amounts of suspended matter
323  III,    10.  3.  2|             asthma, allergies, nausea, increased hair loss, increased spontaneous
324  III,    10.  3.  2|           nausea, increased hair loss, increased spontaneous abortion, dermatitis
325  III,    10.  3.  2|              radiation~Some pesticides~Increased chemical sensitivity~multiple
326  III,    10.  3.  2|         certain human groups can be at increased risk because of their preferential
327  III,    10.  3.  2|           populations clearly shows an increased body burden of some persistent
328  III,    10.  3.  2|           populations clearly shows an increased body burden of some persistent
329  III,    10.  3.  4|            most land areas~Very likely~Increased risk of heat-related mortality,
330  III,    10.  3.  4|            over most areas~Very likely~Increased risk of deaths, injuries,
331  III,    10.  3.  4|                in drought areas~Likely~Increased risk of food and water shortages,
332  III,    10.  3.  4|          water- and foodborne diseases~Increased incidence of extreme high
333  III,    10.  3.  4|             excluding tsunamis)~Likely~Increased risk of deaths and injuries
334  III,    10.  3.  4|               for research (2007-2013) increased the budget for environment,
335  III,    10.  3.  4|              reduced glacier cover and increased ocean acidification, with
336  III,    10.  3.  4|                 Health effects include increased summer heat related mortality
337  III,    10.  3.  4|           among people aged 75 or more increased by 70%, in United Kingdom
338  III,    10.  3.  4|          higher intensity and duration increased the risk of dying during
339  III,    10.  3.  4|           long-term problems including increased rates of anxiety and depression
340  III,    10.  3.  4|               health problems, such as increased incidence of anxiety and
341  III,    10.  3.  4|            agricultural production and increased production costs, led to
342  III,    10.  3.  4|              and shigellosis dysentery increased during the 2004 droughts
343  III,    10.  3.  4|             are also accompanied by an increased number of patients seeking
344  III,    10.  3.  4|                prolonged droughts with increased risks of forest and bush
345  III,    10.  3.  4|              response, due to expected increased risk of flooding under future
346  III,    10.  4.  1|                problems are related to increased moisture and humidity, part
347  III,    10.  4.  1|              health effects, including increased mortality, in adults. The
348  III,    10.  4.  1|              Switzerland also found an increased occurrence of symptoms in
349  III,    10.  4.  1|              symptoms in children with increased air pollution levels. Several
350  III,    10.  4.  1|              24-city study) also found increased bronchial, but not asthmatic,
351  III,    10.  4.  1|                PM is also linked to an increased frequency of chronic bronchitis,
352  III,    10.  4.  1|             sources is associated with increased asthma occurrence and exacerbations
353  III,    10.  4.  1|               important, including the increased level of hygiene in homes
354  III,    10.  4.  1|                Europe - because of the increased use of air conditioners -
355  III,    10.  4.  2|             214/2005, providing for an increased monitoring in goats.~ ~In
356  III,    10.  4.  2|            Campylobacter cases in 2005 increased by 7.8% compared to the
357  III,    10.  4.  2|                reported in humans, the increased reporting of cases in domestic
358  III,    10.  4.  2|            concentration in human~milk increased until 1997,~after which
359  III,    10.  4.  2|                the area of crops grown increased by 3%, the area treated
360  III,    10.  4.  2|                by 3%, the area treated increased by 42%, but the total pesticide
361  III,    10.  4.  2|            lower rates of application, increased 3 fold by 2004. Whilst fungicide
362  III,    10.  4.  2|             2004. Whilst fungicide use increased by 56% and herbicides by
363  III,    10.  4.  2|           total annual weights applied increased by only 14% and 25% respectively
364  III,    10.  4.  2|              spinach, lettuce),~water; increased in both~through use of artificial~
365  III,    10.  4.  2|          quality or nutritional value, increased crop productivity, herbicide
366  III,    10.  4.  2|              from an unexpected new or increased significant exposure and/
367  III,    10.  4.  3|              threats. Exploitation and increased urbanisation of coastal
368  III,    10.  4.  3|               water and sewage sludge. Increased levels of drug residues
369  III,    10.  4.  3|        wastewater discharges. Since an increased re-use of wastewater is
370  III,    10.  4.  3|            re-using of waste water and increased desalination of sea water
371  III,    10.  4.  5|                change factors, such as increased average annual temperatures
372  III,    10.  4.  5|                annual temperatures and increased eutrophication.~ ~Concerns
373  III,    10.  4.  5|        treatment. These estimates have increased considerably over the past
374  III,    10.  4.  5|           while total waste generation increased by 5% between 1996 and 2004
375  III,    10.  4.  5|           generation in the EU-25+EFTA increased 20% over the 1996-2004 period.
376  III,    10.  4.  5|                share of exports in GDP increased from 16%-31%, while the
377  III,    10.  4.  5|             from 20%-29% while exports increased from 20-39%.~ ~Soil contamination~ ~
378  III,    10.  4.  5|       remediated. These estimates have increased considerably over the past
379  III,    10.  4.  5|         follows a tiered approach with increased efforts and expenses at
380  III,    10.  5.  1|            However, it appears to have increased in Europe since the 1980s,
381  III,    10.  5.  1|            building syndrome symptoms, increased airway infections and impaired
382  III,    10.  5.  1|            temperature from 25 to 20°C increased speed at different tests
383  III,    10.  5.  1|         Moreover, test performance was increased when the ventilation flow
384  III,    10.  5.  1|               the ventilation flow was increased (Wargocki and Wyon, 2007b).
385  III,    10.  5.  1|             capital and trust, and (b) increased levels of physical activity
386  III,    10.  5.  1|          cities, where the exposure to increased noise levels often affects
387  III,    10.  5.  1|         single-dwelling houses against increased air humidity, domestic mite
388  III,    10.  5.  2|           expressed for males who have increased mortality rates in rural areas
389  III,    10.  5.  2|           Spain and Greece there is an increased mortality in females irrespective
390  III,    10.  5.  2|          health services. Mostly, this increased demand is related to a greater
391  III,    10.  5.  2|             female citizens, there are increased health demands in rural areas
392  III,    10.  5.  2|                in rural areas based on increased prevalence of trauma, pregnancies,
393  III,    10.  5.  2|       rural settings have always shown increased levels of these infections.
394  III,    10.  5.  2|                 and suicide rates have increased (Wood, 2004).~ ~For what
395  III,    10.  5.  2|         occurrence of STIs is strongly increased by urbanization levels:~ ~
396  III,    10.  5.  2|               developed countries have increased problems with the accessibility
397  III,    10.  5.  2|               rural health practice:~• increased emergency/minor casualty
398  III,    10.  5.  2|        services as a causal factor for increased morbidity and/or mortality
399  III,    10.  5.  3|              rate of accidents at work increased.~ ~Table 10.5.3.6. Change
400  III,    10.  5.  3|           perceived work intensity has increased in European Member States.
401  III,    10.  5.  3|           perceived work intensity has increased, passing from 33% in 1991
402  III,    10.  5.  3|                areas, job demands have increased, including an intensification
403  III,    10.  5.  3|               administrative tasks has increased in professions such as health-care
404  III,    10.  5.  3|   participation in decision-making and increased communication with colleagues.
405  III,    10.  5.  3|             their health and safety at increased risk, compared to other
406  III,    10.  5.  3|           medium-sized enterprises has increased. European figures from Eurostat
407  III,    10.  6.  1|              poor social networks have increased rates of premature death
408  III,    10.  6.  1|    relationships were found to have an increased risk of coronary heart disease (
409  III,    10.  6.  2|              themselves better against increased health risks and/or have
410  III,    10.  6.  2|            good reproductive health~9. Increased physical activity~10. Good
411  III,    10.  6.  2|            health sector has gradually increased its cooperation with other
412   IV,    11.  1.  3|             can be characterized by an increased attention on effectiveness
413   IV,    11.  1.  3|               in many cases through an increased role of government, either
414   IV,    11.  1.  3|             chapter. Nevertheless, the increased involvement of individuals
415   IV,    11.  1.  3|               on healthcare per capita increased by almost 100% between 1990
416   IV,    11.  1.  3|            reforms were associated to: increased difficulties in accessing
417   IV,    11.  1.  3|          accountability. Alongside the increased potential for deploying
418   IV,    11.  1.  5|                s need, thus require an increased collaboration between hospital
419   IV,    11.  1.  5|              errors were found to have increased by 243% from 1993 to 1998,
420   IV,    11.  1.  6|                found that: a) activity increased by adding services to existing
421   IV,    11.  1.  6|        financing to other aims such as increased transparency (HOPE - European
422   IV,    11.  1.  6|           improved, and hospital costs increased more slowly, but there were
423   IV,    11.  1.  6|             Denmark, hospital activity increased, and the private sector
424   IV,    11.  1.  6|                 and the private sector increased its market share. In Finland,
425   IV,    11.  1.  6|                lower waiting times and increased accessibility, insurance
426   IV,    11.  1.  6|           benefits packages because of increased financial transparency,
427   IV,    11.  1.  6|              of improved efficiency or increased activity (Boyle, 2007).~ ~
428   IV,    11.  1.  6|               general taxes has likely increased the administrative costs
429   IV,    11.  2.  2|             data suggest that, despite increased attention at policy level
430   IV,    11.  3.  2|           allocated to pharmaceuticals increased by about 20% or more in
431   IV,    11.  5.  1|           transplantation has steadily increased during the past decades.
432   IV,    11.  5.  4|               the donation process has increased efficiency in the procurement
433   IV,    11.  5.  4|                donors has dramatically increased over recent years. The increase
434   IV,    11.  6.  1|             per capita health spending increased by more than 80% in real
435   IV,    11.  6.  1|                By 1990, this share had increased to nearly 7%. Today, it
436   IV,    11.  6.  1|      unemployment eroded the view that increased welfare spending was sustainable.
437   IV,    11.  6.  2|               of private financing has increased over the last ten years,
438   IV,    11.  6.  2|            although it appears to have increased as a proportion of total
439   IV,    11.  6.  2|           central taxation), and 3) an increased reliance on local taxation
440   IV,    11.  6.  2|         taxation may be associated to: increased transparency because there
441   IV,    11.  6.  2|           amount spent on health care; increased accountability because local
442   IV,    11.  6.  2|           taxation may, however, cause increased rigidity in the budgetary
443   IV,    11.  6.  2|             example France and Germany increased their reliance on non-earnings-related
444   IV,    11.  6.  2|               are improved efficiency, increased innovation and more consumer-driven
445   IV,    11.  6.  2|            cover for faster access and increased consumer choice. As supplementary
446   IV,    11.  6.  2|            same time, informal charges increased throughout the 1980s, with
447   IV,    11.  6.  2|          formal and informal payments) increased from 9% of total expenditure
448   IV,    11.  6.  3|           proportion of total taxation increased from an average of 15.4%
449   IV,    11.  6.  4|            2005 period, there was also increased evidence of risk selection
450   IV,    11.  6.  4|             inequalities may have even increased over the 1990s (Thomson
451   IV,    12.  2    |            salt and of salty foods, an increased intake of fruits, vegetables
452   IV,    12.  2    |           appropriate changes, such as increased availability of low-fat
453   IV,    12.  2    |                 could be significantly increased in nearly all countries,
454   IV,    12.  2    |             sales were associated with increased rates of domestic violence
455   IV,    12.  2    |                studies have found that increased expenditure on advertising
456   IV,    12.  2    |         advertising is associated with increased alcohol-related harm amongst
457   IV,    12.  2    |        evidence of positive effects on increased knowledge about alcohol
458   IV,    12. 10    |               municipalities. This has increased the possibility of integration
459   IV,    12. 10    |                  taxes on alcopops are increased in 2004 (Act on alcopop
460   IV,    12. 10    |               in the health sector has increased significantly since 1997
461   IV,    12. 10    |        pensioners, while law 2676/1999 increased the amount of the benefit
462   IV,    12. 10    |            good reproductive health~9. Increased physical activity~10. Good
463   IV,    13.Acr    |             data suggest that, despite increased attention at policy level
464   IV,    13.  3    |                fundamentally positive: increased life expectancy - often
465   IV,    13.  5    |        effective policies. However, an increased longevity leads to changing
466   IV,    13.  5    |         hearing, to impaired mobility, increased risks of falls and fractures
467   IV,    13.  5    |         diminished quality of life and increased health care costs. Although
468   IV,    13.  5    |           would put heavy pressure for increased public spending unless the
469   IV,    13.  5    |               evaluation methods.~ ~An increased demand on health care services
470   IV,    13.  7.  2|       facilities; higher productivity, increased exports, ultimately leading