Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    -,     1           |        related Community and National policies;~· Provision of data and
  2    -,     1           |            practicable approaches and policies.~This Report, therefore,
  3    -,     1           |              the adoption of specific policies and control tools to address
  4    -,     1           |               gaps, what are the main policies and control tools adopted
  5    -,     1           |          health determinants and main policies developed at Community and
  6    -,     1           |        factors; (v) Control tools and policies; (vi) Future developments; (
  7    -,     1           |             health systems and health policies as well as to facilitate
  8    -,     1           |          adopt and implement adequate policies and control tools to further
  9    I,     2.  1       |             time, the national health policies and services of European
 10    I,     2.  1       |           European population. Social policies, renowned for their major
 11    I,     2.  1       |              to adopt a health-in-all policies approach. Social protection
 12    I,     2.  2       |               and the market oriented policies in the new Member States
 13    I,     2.  3       |          providing extra time for the policies to adapt.~ ~Migration to
 14    I,     2.  3       |               of family reunification policies and birth patterns of migrants.
 15    I,     2.  4       |            2008), social and economic policies can and should be mutually
 16    I,     2.  4       |          reforms and active inclusion policies have contributed to higher
 17    I,     2.  4       |             framework of sound fiscal policies, is therefore fundamental
 18    I,     2.  4       |          through well-designed social policies, and strengthening efforts
 19    I,     2.  4       |               and anti-discrimination policies need to be reinforced, not
 20    I,     2.  4       |             the regular monitoring of policiesimpact and effectiveness
 21    I,     2.  4       |               States are implementing policies to reduce these inequalities,
 22    I,     2.  4       |              A combination of general policies and those tailored to lower
 23    I,     2.  4       |             for equal needs. Finally, policies outside the health sector
 24    I,     2.  5       |          providing extra time for the policies to adapt.~ ~The situation
 25    I,     2.  8       |             continue if no additional policies and measures are implemented.
 26    I,     2. 10.  3   |              destruction”~ ~Community policies for the digital economy
 27    I,     2. 10.  3   |          enterprise: linking European Policies, 2006). From a business
 28    I,     2. 10.  3   |                A review of e-Business policies and trends and assessment
 29    I,     3.  2       |               of family reunification policies and birth patterns of migrants.
 30   II,     4.  1       |       citizens are measured. Thus the policies and strategies related to
 31   II,     4.  1       |              which specific Community policies have been made. However,
 32   II,     4.  3       |              Sustainable Progress and Policies. B. Marin and A. Zaidi.
 33   II,     5.  1.  1   |               to establish preventive policies. Screening and case identification
 34   II,     5.  1.  1   |      considered in primary prevention policies at the moment are: exposure
 35   II,     5.  2.  3   |          different hospital admission policies, different coding practice
 36   II,     5.  2.  3   |          different hospital admission policies, different coding practice
 37   II,     5.  2.  3   |          different hospital admission policies and coding practices. The
 38   II,     5.  2.  5   |              5.2.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Results from the WHO MONICA
 39   II,     5.  2.  5   |              that effective measures, policies and interventions are in
 40   II,     5.  2.  5   |          integration of health in all policies expressed by the conclusions
 41   II,     5.  2.  6   |            other diseases. Therefore, policies that prevent and reduce
 42   II,     5.  2.  6   |             to rmember that all these policies, although important, would
 43   II,     5.  2.  6   |        consider in their own national policies and health system governance
 44   II,     5.  3.  7   |               5.3.6 Control tools and policies~ ~Cancer control means cancer
 45   II,     5.  3.  8   |       stakeholders to put into effect policies that can achieve a substantial
 46   II,     5.  4.  2   |            long term impact of health policies. This indicator is defined
 47   II,     5.  4.  3   |               different public health policies.~Levels of BMI among diabetics.
 48   II,     5.  4.  6   |              5.4.6. Control tools and policies~Long term complications,
 49   II,     5.  4.  6   |         support their national health policies.~The European Commission,
 50   II,     5.  4.  6   |       health promotion and prevention policies and programmes for the whole
 51   II,     5.  4.  6   |       diabetes into account across EU policies.~· to continue to cooperate
 52   II,     5.  4.  6   |        nations shall develop national policies for the prevention, diagnosis
 53   II,     5.  5.Int   |          effective treatments. Better policies and provision of services
 54   II,     5.  5.Int   |          regarding the development of policies and programmes; development
 55   II,     5.  5.  1   |              5.1.4. Control tools and policies~ ~EU Mental Health Policies~ ~
 56   II,     5.  5.  1   |           policies~ ~EU Mental Health Policies~ ~Depression has been acknowledged
 57   II,     5.  5.  1   |              strengthen mental health policies in the EU.~o Putting Mental
 58   II,     5.  5.  1   |         Interventions into CountriesPolicies, Practice and the Health
 59   II,     5.  5.  1   |       health promotion and Prevention Policies (2004- ) was especially
 60   II,     5.  5.  1   |             to develop strategies and policies for mental health promotion,
 61   II,     5.  5.  3   |              3.1.5. Control tools and policies~ ~The WHO Regional Office
 62   II,     5.  5.  3   |             the States in formulating policies and programmes. The WHO
 63   II,     5.  5.  3   |           implementing programmes and policies;~· develop clear and ambiguous
 64   II,     5.  5.  3   |               due to health insurance policies but are probably indicators
 65   II,     5.  5.  3   |               specified mental health policies. More than two fifths of
 66   II,     5.  5.  3   |              3.2.4. Control tools and policies~ ~National mental health
 67   II,     5.  5.  3   |              3.3.4. Control tools and policies~ ~On May 9th , 1996, the
 68   II,     5.  5.  3   |         Expected~ ~ ~Europe~Insurance policies~Prevalent cohorts~32~12.
 69   II,     5.  5.  3   |                 1998~Poland~Insurance policies~Prevalent cohort~218~121.
 70   II,     5.  5.  3   |         Alstrom, 1950 (*)~ ~Insurance policies~Prevalent cohort~32~14.6~
 71   II,     5.  5.  3   |              3.4.4. Control tools and policies~ ~Disease severity and poor
 72   II,     5.  5.  3   |              3.5.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Primary prevention~The
 73   II,     5.  5.  3   |               of functional status.~ ~Policies~ ~The Framework Directive
 74   II,     5.  5.  3   |            flexible labour and social policies for people with MS and the
 75   II,     5.  5.  3   |              3.6.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Primary prevention~Currently,
 76   II,     5.  5.  3   |         progression of the disease.~ ~Policies~No specific plans have been
 77   II,     5.  6.  5   |              5.6.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Strategies have been developed
 78   II,     5.  7.  1   |         translated into public health policies. Moreover, early detection
 79   II,     5.  7.  1   |            ultimate scope of devising policies aimed at improving clinical
 80   II,     5.  7.  1   |        recognized, few countries have policies for CKD. The high prevalence
 81   II,     5.  7.  1   |             For these reasons, health policies for CKD need to be harmonized
 82   II,     5.  7.  1   |            need to be harmonized with policies for other chronic diseases.~ ~
 83   II,     5.  7.  2   |        planners in the formulation of policies for the care of renal failure
 84   II,     5.  7.  5   |              5.7.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Primary prevention~ ~See
 85   II,     5.  7.  5   |        detection of these diseases.~ ~Policies~ ~· The Danish Health Ministry
 86   II,     5.  7.  5   |           subjects into public health policies on cardiovascular disease
 87   II,     5.  7.  5   |             to improve CKD diagnosis. Policies regarding evaluation of
 88   II,     5.  7.  5   |            There are no public health policies on CKD or RRT in Estonia
 89   II,     5.  7.  6   |        summarized in the paragraph on policies a growing number of Member
 90   II,     5.  7.  6   |             developed national health policies regarding RRT for ESRD.
 91   II,     5.  7.  6   |           have developed this kind of policies for CKD. The development
 92   II,     5.  7.  6   |              The development of these policies, however, including full
 93   II,     5.  7.  6   |               the introduction, these policies for CKD will need to be
 94   II,     5.  7.  6   |            need to be harmonized with policies for other chronic diseases.~ ~
 95   II,     5.  7.  6   |              successfully implemented policies that ensure superior donation
 96   II,     5.  7.  6   |              promulgation of specific policies at European level may be
 97   II,     5.  8.  5   |              5.8.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Primary prevention~ ~COPD
 98   II,     5.  8.  5   |               at a reasonable cost.~ ~Policies~ ~Different COPD guidelines
 99   II,     5.  9. FB   |               FB.6. Control tools and policies~ ~Primary prevention~ ~In
100   II,     5.  9.  4   |      considered in primary prevention policies at the moment are:~ ~1.
101   II,     5.  9.  5   |              5.9.5. Control tools and policies~ ~For a better assessment
102   II,     5.  9.  5   |      considered in primary prevention policies at the moment are:~· allergenic
103   II,     5.  9.  5   |              of rhinitis in Europe.~ ~Policies~ ~At policy level the most
104   II,     5. 10.  5   |               10.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Since the main way of
105   II,     5. 11.  5   |               11.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Prevention of skin disease
106   II,     5. 11.  5   |            develop national plans and policies adapted to their needs.
107   II,     5. 12.  5   |               12.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Primary prevention~ ~A
108   II,     5. 12.  5   |               prevention and European policies~ ~There is no clear secondary
109   II,     5. 12.  5   |           alcoholic beverages, fiscal policies to rise the price of alcohol
110   II,     5. 12.  5   |             information and education policies in order to increase social
111   II,     5. 14.  5   |               14.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Primary prevention~ ~For
112   II,     5. 14.  5   |         support their national health policies. The development of national
113   II,     5. 14.  5   |           areas or targets for health policies. There is a noticeable trend
114   II,     5. 14.  5   |              with reference to social policies enabling goals. For example,
115   II,     5. 14.  6   |                               5.14.6. Policies~ ~At the 60th World Health
116   II,     5. 14.  6   |             health into public health policies, ensure information surveillance
117   II,     5. 15.  4   |               15.4. Control tools and policies~ ~Several policies are already
118   II,     5. 15.  4   |          tools and policies~ ~Several policies are already in place in
119   II,     5. 15.  4   |             of rare diseases; support policies on rare diseases in the
120   II,     5. 15.  4   |            developing national health policies; ensure that common policy
121   II,     5. 15.  4   |     collective level; coordination of policies and initiatives at MS level
122   II,     5. 15.  5   |            with a RD and have defined policies to meet these needs. These
123   II,     5. 15.  5   |               determining RD research policies and projects. Patients are
124   II,     6.  3.  2   |         reported.~ ~Control tools and policies~ ~Control tools include
125   II,     6.  3.  2   |  Acinetobacter.~ ~ ~Control tools and policies~ ~ ~Approximately 2030%
126   II,     6.  3.  3   |            occur.~ ~Control tools and policies~ ~It is estimated that 30%
127   II,     6.  3.  4   |             2005.~ ~Control tools and policies~ ~In the coming years there
128   II,     6.  3.  5   |             with proper public health policies. For example, there is a
129   II,     6.  3.  5   |              terms of the vaccination policies of Member States as many
130   II,     6.  4       |                6.4. Control tools and policies~ ~
131   II,     7.  1       |              prioritise issues, guide policies and evaluate the success
132   II,     7.  2.  8   |               and monitor development policies are often derived from such
133   II,     7.  3.  3   |           national hospital admission policies and healthcare systems.
134   II,     7.  4.  3   |            and in support of existing policies.~ ~
135   II,     7.  5       |               some injury area; laws, policies and programmes for fire
136   II,     7.  5       |               development of national policies to prevent violence and
137   II,     7.  5       |             is needed to develop good policies and programmes. The European
138   II,     7.  7       |              Eds.) (2006): Developing policies to prevent injuries and
139   II,     8.  1       |           OVERALL DISABILITY DATA AND POLICIES~ ~
140   II,     8.  1.  1   |          which require special health policies. Until now, models of disability
141   II,     8.  1.  5   |                                8.1.5. Policies and control tools~ ~Equality
142   II,     8.  1.  5   |              broad range of Community policies which facilitate the active
143   II,     8.  1.  5(4)|               formulate and implement policies to give effect to the present
144   II,     8.  1.  5   |              board in all relevant EU policies. The first phase of the
145   II,     8.  2.  1   |              2.1.5. Control tools and policies~ ~People with intellectual
146   II,     8.  2.  1   |            supports are inadequate.~ ~Policies~EU policy focuses on reduction
147   II,     8.  2.  1   |      inequalities (see the chapter on policies related to overall disabilities).
148   II,     8.  2.  1   |              2005). Reflecting social policies in the Member States favouring
149   II,     8.  2.  2   |              2.2.5. Control tools and policies~ ~The global initiative
150   II,     9.  1.  1   |           risk~ F: Neonatal screening policies~Maternal health~ C: Maternal
151   II,     9.  1.  1   |          monitor health practices and policies.~ ~First of all, the data
152   II,     9.  1.  2   |          Differing prenatal screening policies and practices, differences
153   II,     9.  1.  2   |              1.2.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Primary Prevention~ ~Primary
154   II,     9.  1.  2   |             EUROCAT, 2005). Screening policies vary between European countries (
155   II,     9.  1.  2   |         Public health initiatives and policies~ ~Congenital anomalies straddle
156   II,     9.  1.  2   |          special susceptibility.~ ~b) Policies aimed at ensuringhealthy
157   II,     9.  1.  2   |              knowledge with effective policies, as well as research into
158   II,     9.  1.  2   |            Report: Prenatal Screening Policies in Europe". EUROCAT Central
159   II,     9.  2.  4   |              or modified by different policies and legislation.~ ~ ~Table
160   II,     9.  2.  5   |              9.2.5. Control tools and policies~ ~ ~Control tools and policies
161   II,     9.  2.  5   |        policies~ ~ ~Control tools and policies are provided for specific
162   II,     9.  2.  5   |      medicines for use in children.~ ~Policies~ ~EU policy for children
163   II,     9.  2.  5   |             EU action~- To improve EU policieseffectiveness vis-à-vis
164   II,     9.  2.  6   |          represent only a small part. Policies on planning and urban design,
165   II,     9.  2.  6   |             some of the other kind of policies which may have an impact
166   II,     9.  2.  6   |             considering Health in All Policies, not least under the Finnish
167   II,     9.  2.  7   |          Conclusions on Health in All Policies (HiAP), Brussels.~ ~De Smedt,
168   II,     9.  2.  7   |                  2006): Health in All PoliciesPotential and Prospects;
169   II,     9.  3.  1   |       requires specific attention and policies.~ ~Concern arises also for
170   II,     9.  3.  1   |              3.1.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Control tools and policies
171   II,     9.  3.  1   |          policies~ ~Control tools and policies are provided for specific
172   II,     9.  3.  1   |             Designing National Health Policies with an Integrated Gender
173   II,     9.  3.  3   |              3.3.4. Control tools and policies~ ~Obviously, risky sexual
174   II,     9.  3.  3   |              are examples of national policies to face the present situation
175   II,     9.  3.  3   |            the national sexual health policies in the western European
176   II,     9.  3.  3   |          Europe: A reference guide to policies and practices guide (2006).
177   II,     9.  4.  1   |            and European public health policies for older people and the
178   II,     9.  4.  1   |     communication of health promotion policies to target groups.~ ~Diversity
179   II,     9.  4.  1   |       population must be reflected in policies and clinical practice. Public
180   II,     9.  4.  2   |            guide future public health policies.~ ~Recent data and reports
181   II,     9.  4.  2   |          equity-oriented research and policies.~ ~A number of conditions
182   II,     9.  4.  5   |              9.4.5. Control tools and policies~ ~Control tools and policies
183   II,     9.  4.  5   |          policies~ ~Control tools and policies are provided for specific
184   II,     9.  4.  5   |              far as control tools and policies in elderly are concerned,
185   II,     9.  4.  5   |             at community level. These policies would have a positive effect
186   II,     9.  4.  5   |             as a basis for looking at policies for healthcare and long-term
187   II,     9.  4.  5   |          older women are addressed in policies and service provision (International
188   II,     9.  4.  5   |        information society.~ ~Special Policies. EU, UN and WHO policies
189   II,     9.  4.  5   |              Policies. EU, UN and WHO policies related to healthy ageing
190   II,     9.  4.  5   |        protection for all citizens EU policies, inter alia on age discrimination
191   II,     9.  4.  6   |             2005), the development of policies and programmes that allow
192   II,     9.  5.  3   |               discriminatory cultural policies, practices which deny gender
193   II,     9.  5.  4   |              9.5.4. Control tools and policies~ ~Table 9.5.10. European
194   II,     9.  5.  4   |          States’ co-ordinatination of policies on health and long term
195   II,     9.  5.  4   |               09/08/2006Employment policies of the Member States.~ Reference
196   II,     9.  5.  4   |               on the effectiveness of policies.~ ~Tackling inequalities~ ~
197   II,     9.  5.  4   |     inequality. The implementation of policies and programmes that increase
198   II,     9.  5.  4   |           Most effective however, are policies that equalise status: most
199   II,     9.  5.  4   |         framework for the development policies of the European Community
200   II,     9.  5.  6   |             Designing National Health Policies with an Integrated Gender
201  III,    10.  1       |       conditions might be modified by policies. Looking at public health
202  III,    10.  1.  1   |           reinforcing factors such as policies on smoking (e.g. age limits,
203  III,    10.  1.  3   |                 Whitehead, M. (1991): Policies and Strategies to Promote
204  III,    10.  2.  1   |              range of other Community policies; and~· ensuring the Community’
205  III,    10.  2.  1   |           impact. Prices and taxation policies are attributed the greatest
206  III,    10.  2.  1   |       approach, i.e. a package of six policies called MPOWER. The six MPOWER
207  III,    10.  2.  1   |            tobacco use and prevention policiesProtect people from tobacco smoke~·
208  III,    10.  2.  1   |               Current tobacco control policies seek to reduce the supply
209  III,    10.  2.  1   |            through price and taxation policies) and the demand for tobacco (
210  III,    10.  2.  1   |             effective tobacco control policies in Sweden may have contributed
211  III,    10.  2.  1   |             TCS) and based on the six policies described by the World Bank.~ ~
212  III,    10.  2.  1   |           impact. Prices and taxation policies (1) are attributed most
213  III,    10.  2.  1   |               lens to tobacco control policies. Brussels: ENSP, 2004. Available
214  III,    10.  2.  1   |              Status Report on Alcohol PoliciesWHO-EURO Health for All
215  III,    10.  2.  1   |              1.2.4. Control tools and policies.~ ~Risk reduction strategies
216  III,    10.  2.  1   |            are implemented by alcohol policies, which include authoritative
217  III,    10.  2.  1   |            central purpose of alcohol policies is to serve the interests
218  III,    10.  2.  1   |      particularly sensitive to price. Policies that increase alcohol prices
219  III,    10.  2.  1   |             jurisdictions with strong policies in place for what concerns
220  III,    10.  2.  1   |             impact of adhering to bar policies for avoiding intoxication
221  III,    10.  2.  1   |              1.3.4. Control tools and policies~ ~The European Union has
222  III,    10.  2.  1   |              a framework for national policies and functions as an incentive
223  III,    10.  2.  1   |               last twenty years. Drug policies and their evaluation can
224  III,    10.  2.  1   |              1.5.4. Control tools and policies~ ~The WHA60.17 resolution
225  III,    10.  2.  1   |      incorporated as appropriate into policies for the integrated prevention
226  III,    10.  2.  1   |             maternal and child health policies; (ii) to develop and implement
227  III,    10.  2.  1   |     priorities and targets for health policies which broaden oral health
228  III,    10.  2.  1   |              further empower national policies by facilitating coordinated
229  III,    10.  2.  1   |             spaces and urban planning policies resulting in increasing
230  III,    10.  2.  1   |              1.6.4. Control tools and policies~ ~Thanks to the range of
231  III,    10.  2.  1   |              of sustainable transport policies: Collaboration between the
232  III,    10.  2.  1   |              1.7.5. Control tools and policies~ ~The magnitude of the health
233  III,    10.  2.  1   |               are, in turn, shaped by policies that are responsibility
234  III,    10.  2.  1   |       increasing number have launched policies and action plans in recent
235  III,    10.  2.  1   |           participants in formulating policies (Branca et al, 2007a; Branca
236  III,    10.  2.  1   |             e.g. taxation and pricing policies) have been successfully
237  III,    10.  2.  1   |          tobacco and alcohol; pricing policies for food or its main ingredients
238  III,    10.  2.  1   |           Health impact assessment of policies, with a special focus on
239  III,    10.  2.  1   |             the health effects of all policies at national or local level
240  III,    10.  2.  1   |             evidence on the impact of policies or programmes at national
241  III,    10.  2.  1   |             elements of public health policies and programmes and should
242  III,    10.  2.  1   |              FBDG-messages with other policies related to health promotion (
243  III,    10.  2.  1   |               extent to which its own policies have been brought in line
244  III,    10.  2.  1   |             nutrition and food safety policies).~· Ensure a safe, healthy
245  III,    10.  2.  1   |              impact of programmes and policies).~ ~Different efficient
246  III,    10.  2.  1   |               the impact of community policies on nutritional health and
247  III,    10.  2.  4   |      Rare Diseases~HiaP~Health in all Policies~ICD~International Statistical
248  III,    10.  2.  4   |        translated into evidence-based policies and interventions that improve
249  III,    10.  2.  4   |              2.4.4. Control tools and policies~ ~The issue of genetics
250  III,    10.  2.  4   |     collections.~ ~The “Health in all Policies” (“HiaP”) approach was developed
251  III,    10.  2.  4   |               protection in all their policies. In various regulatory areas
252  III,    10.  2.  4   |           services the “Health in all Policies” doctrine calls for the
253  III,    10.  2.  4   |              fact, the “Health in all Policiesapproach can only be successful
254  III,    10.  2.  4   |               both the “Health in all Policiesidea and the Lisbon Strategy
255  III,    10.  2.  4   |        translated into evidence-based policies and interventions that improve
256  III,    10.  2.  5   |              2.5.4. Control tools and policies~ ~The developmental determinants
257  III,    10.  2.  5   |              been addressed in health policies in a few Member States.
258  III,    10.  2.  5   |          re-evaluate health promotion policies in light of research findings
259  III,    10.  3.  1   |       implementation of energy saving policies recommending reduced ventilation,
260  III,    10.  3.  1   |           their legislation different policies for the various population
261  III,    10.  3.  1   |       successes of primary prevention policies and should provide strong
262  III,    10.  3.  1   |              3.1.4. Control tools and policies~ ~In its task to harmonise
263  III,    10.  3.  1   |      recommendations in 26 countries. Policies and actions relating to
264  III,    10.  3.  1   |             have well developed radon policies, while in others there is
265  III,    10.  3.  1   |               range of UVR protection policies for children and the overall
266  III,    10.  3.  2   |              3.2.4. Control tools and policies~ ~The past few years have
267  III,    10.  3.  2   |       implementation plans for global policies, such as the Globally harmonised
268  III,    10.  3.  3   |              3.3.4. Control tools and policies~ ~See Chapter 6.~ ~ ~
269  III,    10.  3.  4   |               Projections of existing policies for the EU15, show that
270  III,    10.  3.  4   |              3.4.4. Control tools and policies~ ~For what concerns the
271  III,    10.  3.  4   |             forecasting and insurance policies. It also implies international
272  III,    10.  4.  1   |          consequence of energy-saving policies that have led to reduced
273  III,    10.  4.  1   |           effectiveness of protection policies. The age of the vehicle
274  III,    10.  4.  1   |               stress on energy-saving policies has led to reduced air exchange
275  III,    10.  4.  1   |              4.1.4. Control tools and policies~ ~During the 19992004 period
276  III,    10.  4.  1   |         process.~ ~The most effective policies for controlling air pollution
277  III,    10.  4.  1   |           polluting activities.~Those policies can be strengthened through
278  III,    10.  4.  1   |               climate and air quality policies.~Most of this action clearly
279  III,    10.  4.  1   |           effective pollution control policies can be summarized as:~·
280  III,    10.  4.  1   |               climate and air quality policiesReduced demand for polluting
281  III,    10.  4.  2   |              4.2.4. Control tools and policies~ ~On January 1st, 1993,
282  III,    10.  4.  3   |              4.3.4. Control tools and policies~ ~The United Nations Economic
283  III,    10.  4.  5   |            2005).~ ~Control tools and policies~ ~A new EU Bathing water
284  III,    10.  4.  5   |          2007a).~ ~A wide range of EU policies (for instance on water,
285  III,    10.  4.  5   |             protection. But, as these policies have other aims and scopes
286  III,    10.  4.  5   |             197).~ ~Control tools and policies~ ~Soil protection~ ~There
287  III,    10.  4.  5   |             developed within sectoral policies. These include, for example,
288  III,    10.  4.  5   |               directives and national policies have been developed. These
289  III,    10.  4.  5   |             cases in waste management policies. HIA can be done at a policy,
290  III,    10.  5.  1   |              5.1.7. Control tools and policies~ ~It is evident that human
291  III,    10.  5.  1   |               concerns into transport policies. The priority areas are
292  III,    10.  5.  2   |               5.2.4. Control tool and policies~ ~Depending on the type
293  III,    10.  5.  2   |       variations and to inform health policies on priorities and trends.~ ~
294  III,    10.  5.  3   |               of modern public health policies. This is beginning to be
295  III,    10.  5.  3   |        consistency with public health policies (European Commission, 2007).~
296  III,    10.  5.  3   |              5.3.4. Control tools and policies~ ~In this chapter it is
297  III,    10.  5.  3   |            workershealth into other policies.~The scope, objectives and
298  III,    10.  5.  3   |           insurance need to influence policies through the principles of
299  III,    10.  5.  3   |           insurance need to influence policies through the principles of
300  III,    10.  5.  3   |               the need for integrated policies~- combating health inequalities~-
301  III,    10.  6.  1   |              6.1.4. Control tools and policies~ ~Social networks play an
302  III,    10.  6.  2   |               States are implementing policies to reduce these inequalities,
303  III,    10.  6.  2   |              A combination of general policies and those tailored to lower
304  III,    10.  6.  2   |             for equal needs. Finally, policies outside the health sector
305  III,    10.  6.  2   |            Control tools, actions and policies.~ ~ ~Currently, there are
306  III,    10.  6.  2   |           order to assess and develop policies, strategies and measures
307  III,    10.  6.  2   |            idea behind ‘Health in all Policies’. Health in All Policies (
308  III,    10.  6.  2   |              Policies’. Health in All Policies (HiAP) was the main health
309  III,    10.  6.  2   |        citizens into account in their policies. The key factor enabling
310  III,    10.  6.  2   |                 Whitehead, M. (1991). Policies and Strategies to Promote
311  III,    10.  6.  3   |              6.3.4. Control tools and policies~ ~Violence is the result
312   IV                  |          HEALTH SYSTEMS, SERVICES AND POLICIES~ ~
313   IV,    11.  1.  1   |             as social and educational policies, socio-economic and living
314   IV,    11.  1.  1   |           then to develop health care policies to improve the health status
315   IV,    11.  1.  3   |             fact wider ranging social policies (e.g. education leading
316   IV,    11.  1.  3   |                these cost-containment policies and the rationed model became
317   IV,    11.  1.  3   |             be more easily related to policies or practices (Navarro, 2000).~ ~
318   IV,    11.  2.  2   |              in health. Comprehensive policies to reduce social inequalities
319   IV,    11.  2.  2   |               determinants across all policies and activities. The programme320   IV,    11.  2.  2   |               development of national policies, there has been an increase
321   IV,    11.  3.  2   |             pricing and reimbursement policies vary across the EU Member
322   IV,    11.  3.  2   |         pricing (as mentioned above). Policies to promote generic drugs
323   IV,    11.  4       |             development of healthcare policies of given health systems.
324   IV,    11.  4       |               safe, effective, health policies that are patient focused
325   IV,    11.  4       |              world to inform specific policies.~ ~Figure 11.7. Relations
326   IV,    11.  4       |              the actual definition of policies that cannot all be covered
327   IV,    11.  4       |            policy and does not define policies nor make decisions. There
328   IV,    11.  5.  5   |              on organ transplantation policies and planned to apply for
329   IV,    11.  6.  2   |        Careful design of cost sharing policies is needed to protect vulnerable
330   IV,    11.  6.  2   |              integrated public health policies (Mossialos et al, 2000).~ ~
331   IV,    11.  6.  2   |             private medical insurance policies are subject to Insurance
332   IV,    11.  6.  2   |           conducted by the Centre for Policies and Health Services revealed
333   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.~ ~Chaix-Couturier C, Durand-Zaleski
334   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies. Copenhagen, World Health
335   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies: 81-140.~ ~Garfield FB,
336   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies: 189-206.~ ~Glennerster
337   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.~ ~Holland WW, Stewart S
338   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.~ ~HOPE - European Hospital
339   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.~ ~McDaid D, Thornicroft
340   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies. Copenhagen, World Health
341   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.~ ~Mossialos E, Dixon A
342   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.~ ~Mossialos E, Walley T
343   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.~ ~Mossialos E, Walley T
344   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.~ ~Musgrove P (2003): "Judging
345   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.~ ~Rosenthal MB, Fernandopulle
346   IV,    11.  6.  5   |     Observatory on Health Systems and Policies.~ ~Sappington D (1991): "
347   IV,    11.  6.  5   |       background for national quality policies in health systems. Copenhagen
348   IV,    12.  1       |           part of mainstream European policies. During the 70’s, there
349   IV,    12.  1       |         contribute to help to develop policies and strategies in the field
350   IV,    12.  1       |            coordination between their policies and programmes.~ ~ ~ ~Public
351   IV,    12.  1       |           implementation of all union policies and activities” and to work
352   IV,    12.  1       |               priority objectives and policies. Therefore, the large and
353   IV,    12.  1       |       implementation of all Community policies and activities.~Community
354   IV,    12.  1       |             shall complement national policies, shall be directed towards
355   IV,    12.  1       |     coordinate among themselves their policies and programmes in the areas
356   IV,    12.  1       |         become more prominent in many policies of the European Union, now
357   IV,    12.  1       |              broad impact of other EU policies on health, health service
358   IV,    12.  1       |             pricing and reimbursement policies vary across EU Member States.~ ~
359   IV,    12.  2       |              as well as health in all policies (see also Chapter 11.5)
360   IV,    12.  2       |             integrating health in all policies and strengthening the EU’
361   IV,    12.  2       |               with the “Health in All Policiesprinciple (see Section
362   IV,    12.  2       |      development of control tools and policies. For some examples, see
363   IV,    12.  2       |               and 12.5.~ ~Table 12.4. Policies and control tools for selected
364   IV,    12.  2       |              that effective measures, policies and interventions are in
365   IV,    12.  2       |          integration oh health in all policies expressed by the conclusions
366   IV,    12.  2       |              2007. ~ ~ ~ ~Table 12.5. Policies and control tools as applied
367   IV,    12.  2       |              range of other Community policies; and~· ensuring the Community’
368   IV,    12.  2       |            approach, a package of six policies called MPOWER. The six MPOWER
369   IV,    12.  2       |            tobacco use and prevention policies~Protect people from tobacco smoke~
370   IV,    12.  2       |            are implemented by alcohol policies, which include authoritative
371   IV,    12.  2       |            central purpose of alcohol policies is to serve the interests
372   IV,    12.  2       |      particularly sensitive to price. Policies that increase alcohol prices
373   IV,    12.  2       |             jurisdictions with strong policies in place concerning drinking
374   IV,    12.  2       |             impact of adhering to bar policies for avoiding intoxication
375   IV,    12.  3       |             report regularly on their policies and achievements. However,
376   IV,    12.  3       |       protection and social inclusion policies more effective and more
377   IV,    12.  3       |       interaction with other European policies:~Many policies have an impact
378   IV,    12.  3       |               European policies:~Many policies have an impact on social
379   IV,    12.  3       |             not be confined to social policies but should be duly taken
380   IV,    12.  3       |              at stake:~Evidence-based policies are the most effective policies.
381   IV,    12.  3       |       policies are the most effective policies. Accordingly, the Commission
382   IV,    12.  3       |             develop and implement the policies necessary to avoid social
383   IV,    12.  3       |             all those with a stake in policies intended to address poverty
384   IV,    12.  4       |             certain aspects of health policies such as:~ ~· pharmaceuticals
385   IV,    12.  4       |                  The “health in other policiesobjective is achieved through
386   IV,    12.  5       |          vaccination and immunisation policies; improve partnerships, networks,
387   IV,    12.  5       |             impact on health of other policies.~ ~2.1.2. Support initiatives
388   IV,    12.  5       |      cooperation with other Community policies and funds; improve solidarity
389   IV,    12.  5       |             data on health status and policies; develop, with the Community
390   IV,    12.  5       |      development or implementation of policies or legislation related to
391   IV,    12.  5       |           will serve Part II - Health policies and action programmes of
392   IV,    12.  7       |                   12.7. Health in all policies~ ~Policies outside the health
393   IV,    12.  7       |              Health in all policies~ ~Policies outside the health sector
394   IV,    12.  7       |               to assess the impact of policies and specific interventions
395   IV,    12.  7       |      Observatory on Health System and Policies in Brussels produced ad
396   IV,    12.  7       |          Paper includes health in all policies as one of its four fundamental
397   IV,    12.  7       |         conclusions on “Health in All Policies” were adopted in Rome on
398   IV,    12.  7       |          approach. The “Health in all Policiesstrategy, while recognizing
399   IV,    12.  7       |             into consideration in all policies. Yet, we have to see this
400   IV,    12.  7       |          Declaration on Health in all Policies~ ~Health systems impact
401   IV,    12.  7       |          estimating the impact of new policies on health systems, as opposed
402   IV,    12.  8       |           regularly to agree on joint policies and actions in the health
403   IV,    12. 10       |               States institutions and policies have been deeply affected
404   IV,    12. 10       |         States have deeply influenced policies and developments at Community
405   IV,    12. 10       |           food and psychical activity policies.~ ~ ~3. A recently established
406   IV,    12. 10       |               pollution~High priority~Policies to improve outdoor and indoor
407   IV,    12. 10       |           gender mainstreaming health policies. The Department will publish
408   IV,    12. 10       |        INFORMATION ON NATIONAL HEALTH POLICIES AND REPORTS (IRELAND)~National
409   IV,    12. 10       |              based best practices and policies~- Cooperation and networking
410   IV,    12. 10       |              a horizontal approach of policies and services to which multiple
411   IV,    12. 10       |           uncoordinated nature of the policies currently being implemented~
412   IV,    12. 10       |               the equal opportunities policies for men and women by:~7.
413   IV,    12. 10       |             and specificities, health policies begin to integrate a gender
414   IV,    12. 10       |        strengthening of health in all policies approach with emphases on
415   IV,    12. 10       |              inequities, 3) review of policies on alcohol and tobacco,
416   IV,    13.Acr       |              in health. Comprehensive policies to reduce social inequalities
417   IV,    13.Acr       |               determinants across all policies and activities. The programme’
418   IV,    13.Acr       |               development of national policies, there has been an increase
419   IV,    13.  1       |            further develop innovative policies to deal with them. Similar
420   IV,    13.  2.  1   |              priorities when planning policies to promote public health
421   IV,    13.  2.  1   |          health services to implement policies and effectively prevent
422   IV,    13.  3       |              and active labour market policies are needed to target the
423   IV,    13.  3       |              developing public health policies. The lack at European level,
424   IV,    13.  3       |               for the adoption of new policies, for reasons of both economic
425   IV,    13.  3       |              and active labour market policies are needed to target the
426   IV,    13.  4       |                       13.4. Migration policies~ ~A better management of
427   IV,    13.  4       |         dimension of their employment policies.~ ~The 2007 National Reports
428   IV,    13.  4       |               mainstreaming in all EU policies.~ ~For further information
429   IV,    13.  5       |            adoption of more effective policies. However, an increased longevity
430   IV,    13.  5       |               should be strengthening policies to reduce these inequalities,
431   IV,    13.  5       |              A combination of general policies and those tailored to lower
432   IV,    13.  7.  1   |              efforts to other cluster policies and initiatives, a "European
433   IV,    13.  7.  3   |           health promotion strategies/policies, socio-economic determinants
434   IV,    13.  7.  5   |        develop efficient and adequate policies through a better identification
435   IV,    13.  8       |           involves influencing public policies, with a wide range of activities
436   IV,    13.  8       |       profiles as advisors for public policies, and more rationale, cost-effective
437   IV,    13.  8       | cost-effective public health-oriented policies. At European level, the