Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  6    |          funded education is close to 100 for basic and upper-secondary
  2    I,     2. 10.  2|        dimensions range between 1 and 100 nm (0.001-0.1 μm), are characterized
  3    I,     2. 10.  2|       Nanorods: nanoparticles with 1- 100 nm length, used in medicine
  4    I,     2. 10.  2|           Iron-oxide nanoparticles (5-100 nm range) are used for selective
  5    I,     3.  3    |         available, for the past 50 or 100 years or so. The issue is
  6    I,     3.  3    |          depict persons of 0 to about 100 years of age, these pyramids
  7    I,     3.  3    |              of a country in the past 100 years. In addition to population
  8   II,     5.  2.  3|             vary from 42.7 deaths per 100.000 in France to 327.0 deaths
  9   II,     5.  2.  3|            France to 327.0 deaths per 100.000 in Latvia, being there
 10   II,     5.  2.  3|          higher (in men 72 deaths per 100.000 in France and 555 in
 11   II,     5.  2.  3|               Latvia; in women 16 per 100.000 in France and 167 in
 12   II,     5.  2.  3|       population) mortality rates per 100.000.~ ~Mortality trends
 13   II,     5.  2.  3|       countries2 (from 300 to 186 per 100.000), 45% in Central Eastern
 14   II,     5.  2.  3|       countries3 (from 440 to 242 per 100.000), 27% in Eastern Europe
 15   II,     5.  2.  3|       countries4 (from 450 to 326 per 100.000), 37% in Central Europe
 16   II,     5.  2.  3|       countries5 (from 225 to 142 per 100.000), 34% in Southern Europe
 17   II,     5.  2.  3|        countries6 (from 139 to 91 per 100.000) and 27% in Baltic7
 18   II,     5.  2.  3|        countries (from 696 to 505 per 100.000). Similar results can
 19   II,     5.  2.  3|          countries (from 73 to 44 per 100.000), 51% in Central Eastern
 20   II,     5.  2.  3|         countries (from 157 to 77 per 100.000), 23% in Eastern Europe
 21   II,     5.  2.  3|        countries (from 169 to 130 per 100.000), 41% in Northern Europe (
 22   II,     5.  2.  3|            Europe (from 102 to 61 per 100.000), 36% in Baltic Europe
 23   II,     5.  2.  3|        countries (from 231 to 148 per 100.000) and 41% in Southern
 24   II,     5.  2.  3|          countries (from 40 to 23 per 100.000).~ ~Figure 5.2.1. Age-standardized
 25   II,     5.  2.  3|  Age-standardized mortality rates per 100.000. Trends for ischemic
 26   II,     5.  2.  3|  Age-standardized mortality rates per 100.000. Trends for ischemic
 27   II,     5.  2.  3|             and recurrent events) per 100.000 during 10-year registration
 28   II,     5.  2.  3|   cerebrovascular mortality rates per 100.000 men and women aged 35-
 29   II,     5.  2.  3|             varies from 60 deaths per 100.000 in France to 399 deaths
 30   II,     5.  2.  3|              France to 399 deaths per 100.000 in Romania, being there
 31   II,     5.  2.  3|             varies from 36 deaths per 100.000 in France to 297 deaths
 32   II,     5.  2.  3|            Europe (from 133 to 49 per 100.000), 40% in Southern Europe
 33   II,     5.  2.  3|         countries (from 136 to 82 per 100.000), 21% in Northern countries (
 34   II,     5.  2.  3|         countries (from 110 to 87 per 100.000), 34% in Central Eastern
 35   II,     5.  2.  3|           Europe (from 273 to 180 per 100.000) and 6% in Baltic Europe
 36   II,     5.  2.  3|        countries (from 298 to 279 per 100.000). Mortality increased
 37   II,     5.  2.  3|           Europe (from 324 to 357 per 100.000). In 2003, mortality
 38   II,     5.  2.  3|       population) mortality rates per 100.000 Cerebrovascular disease (
 39   II,     5.  2.  3|             Europe (from 89 to 54 per 100.000), 46% in Southern Europe
 40   II,     5.  2.  3|          countries (from 99 to 54 per 100.000), 21% in Northern countries (
 41   II,     5.  2.  3|          countries (from 87 to 68 per 100.000), 13% in Baltic Europe
 42   II,     5.  2.  3|        countries (from 218 to 189 per 100.000) and 37% in Central
 43   II,     5.  2.  3|           Europe (from 193 to 121 per 100.000). Mortality rates increased
 44   II,     5.  2.  3|           Europe (from 203 to 246 per 100.000). In 2003, mortality
 45   II,     5.  2.  3|       population) mortality rates per 100.000 Cerebrovascular disease (
 46   II,     5.  2.  3|              fatal and non fatal) per 100.000 mean of the last 3 years
 47   II,     5.  3.  1|   demonstrated by the fact that about 100 cancer sites are considered
 48   II,     5.  3.  1|               of new cancer cases per 100,000 population at risk;~ ~-
 49   II,     5.  3.  1|              of deaths for cancer per 100,000 population at risk;~ ~-
 50   II,     5.  3.  3|           from registry database with 100% coverage). The estimates
 51   II,     5.  3.  5|            for men (599 new cases per 100,000) and in Denmark for
 52   II,     5.  3.  5|              women (414 new cases per 100,000). Maximum mortality
 53   II,     5.  3.  5|               for men (364 deaths per 100,000) and in Denmark for
 54   II,     5.  3.  5|             for women (196 deaths per 100,000). The highest incidence
 55   II,     5.  3.  5|            for men (482 new cases per 100,000, Figure 5.3.2a) and
 56   II,     5.  3.  5|              women (351 new cases per 100,000, Figure 5.3.2b), while
 57   II,     5.  3.  5|               for men (287 deaths per 100,000, Figure 5.3.4a) and
 58   II,     5.  3.  5|             for women (155 deaths per 100,000, Figure 5.3.4b).~Figures
 59   II,     5.  3.  5|             for men (37 new cases per 100,000) and in Lithuania for
 60   II,     5.  3.  5|               women (18 new cases per 100,000); while maximum levels
 61   II,     5.  3.  5|      Lithuania for men (29 deaths per 100,000) and in Estonia for
 62   II,     5.  3.  5|              for women (12 deaths per 100,000). Incidence and mortality
 63   II,     5.  3.  5|            for men (106 new cases per 100,000) and Switzerland for
 64   II,     5.  3.  5|               women (56 new cases per 100,000). Finland had lower
 65   II,     5.  3.  5|              men and 41 new cases per 100,000 in women). Figures 5.
 66   II,     5.  3.  5|               men (over 40 deaths per 100,000) and for women (over
 67   II,     5.  3.  5|             women (over 24 deaths per 100,000).~Colorectal cancer
 68   II,     5.  3.  5|              cases and 110 deaths per 100,000) against Sweden with
 69   II,     5.  3.  5|               cases and 29 deaths per 100,000). Sweden had a lower
 70   II,     5.  3.  5|                46 vs 41 new cases per 100,000). Eastern Europe had
 71   II,     5.  3.  5|               cases and 85 deaths per 100,000). While Northern Europe
 72   II,     5.  3.  5|               cases and 27 deaths per 100,000 in 2006).~Most European
 73   II,     5.  3.  5|            Belgium (138 new cases per 100,000). Breast cancer incidence
 74   II,     5.  3.  5|             Iceland) to 34 deaths per 100,000 (in Denmark). Mortality
 75   II,     5.  4.  2|             of Type 1 diabetes by age/100,000 population 014 years~
 76   II,     5.  4.  2|               death diabetes mellitus/100,000 general population~12~
 77   II,     5.  4.  2|           population from all causes /100,000 general population,
 78   II,     5.  4.  2|              children in one year per 100.000 children.~Prevalence
 79   II,     5.  4.  2|             age, with values all over 100/1000 for EUCID participating
 80   II,     5.  4.  2|              replacement therapy) per 100,000 individuals in the diabetic
 81   II,     5.  4.  2|          dialysis/transplantation per 100.000 diabetic population
 82   II,     5.  4.  2|          dialysis/transplantation per 100,000 individuals in the diabetic
 83   II,     5.  4.  2|               death diabetes mellitus/100,000 general population.
 84   II,     5.  4.  2|        medical) in diabetic patients /100,000 general population~9~
 85   II,     5.  4.  2|          stroke in diabetic patients /100,000 general population~10~
 86   II,     5.  4.  2|       infarction in diabetic patients/100,000 general population~10~ ~
 87   II,     5.  4.  2|         amputations (above ankle) per 100,000 individuals in the diabetic
 88   II,     5.  4.  2|            ischemic and bleeding) per 100,000 individuals in the diabetic
 89   II,     5.  4.  2|             myocardial infarction per 100,000 individuals in the diabetic
 90   II,     5.  4.  3|            and 60 (Finland) cases per 100,000 per year. The median
 91   II,     5.  4.  3|         Cyprus) to 149 (Scotland) per 100,000, with a median of 79 (
 92   II,     5.  4.  3|          dialysis/transplantation per 100.000 diabetic population.
 93   II,     5.  4.  3|            with a median of 304 every 100,000 diabetics, corresponding
 94   II,     5.  4.  3|                and 199 (Portugal) per 100,000 in 10 countries delivering
 95   II,     5.  4.  3|                The median value is 31/100,000, corresponding to France.
 96   II,     5.  4.  3|             between 32% (Finland) and 100% (Cyprus).~Level of blood
 97   II,     5.  4.  3|          Scotland) to 574 (Spain) per 100,000 diabetes patients, with
 98   II,     5.  4.  3|              with a median of 669 per 100,000. There is a clear influence
 99   II,     5.  4.  4|        average, a town of Europe with 100 000 inhabitants would loose
100   II,     5.  4.  6|           gold standard to achieve is 100%. Thus, the dissemination
101   II,     5.  4.  8|            and Metabolism 2001;14(2), 100-103.~Carinci M, Federici
102   II,     5.  5.  1|         mental disorders as total per 100 000 population for newly
103   II,     5.  5.  1|             self-inflicted injury per 100 000 population. Age standardisation
104   II,     5.  5.  1|             intentional self-harm per 100 000 whole population (standardized
105   II,     5.  5.  1|               inflicted accidents per 100 000 people by country and
106   II,     5.  5.  1|              inflicted accidents (per 100 000 people) by gender in
107   II,     5.  5.  1|              inflicted accidents (per 100 000) in Europe.~ ~The changes
108   II,     5.  5.  1|               at global level, 70 per 100 000 and Lithuanian women
109   II,     5.  5.  1|              in the world with 14 per 100 000 (WHO statistics).~ ~
110   II,     5.  5.  3|           that bulimia affects 30 per 100.000 females, whereby the
111   II,     5.  5.  3|            incidence rate of 81,1 per 100.000 (Hoek and van Hoeken,
112   II,     5.  5.  3|      Worldwide, between 16 and 42 per 100 000 population experience
113   II,     5.  5.  3|             crude F20-death rates per 100 000 inhabitants would allow
114   II,     5.  5.  3|             about 20.506 is more than 100 fold higher than the value
115   II,     5.  5.  3|      psychologists from 0.1 to 96 per 100 000 population (WHO, 2005c).
116   II,     5.  5.  3|              ranges from 44 to 73 per 100,000, while the incidence
117   II,     5.  5.  3|              ranges from 24 to 57 per 100,000 (Forsgren et al, 2005;
118   II,     5.  5.  3|               5.3.4.2. Incidence (per 100,000) of epilepsy in Europe,
119   II,     5.  5.  3|             cases (incidence 23.5 per 100,000 per year). Undetermined
120   II,     5.  5.  3|              occurred in 15% (8.7 per 100,000 per year), cryptogenic
121   II,     5.  5.  3|              epilepsy in 16% (8.8 per 100,000 per year), symptomatic
122   II,     5.  5.  3|              epilepsy in 15% (8.4 per 100,000 per year), and idiopathic
123   II,     5.  5.  3|               epilepsy in 6% (3.4 per 100,000 per year). In Bordeaux,
124   II,     5.  5.  3|          lower. The rate was 15.3 per 100,000 for localization-related
125   II,     5.  5.  3|            symptomatic 13.6), 6.7 per 100,000 for generalized epilepsies (
126   II,     5.  5.  3|          symptomatic 1.1) and 1.9 per 100,000 for undetermined epilepsies (
127   II,     5.  5.  3|       epilepsy ranges from 1 to 8 per 100,000 population per year,
128   II,     5.  5.  3|            mortality rates at 1-2 per 100,000 (Massey et al, 1985).~
129   II,     5.  5.  3|   investigating mortality in the past 100 years, the SMR for epilepsy
130   II,     5.  5.  3|              5.3.5.2. Prevalence (per 100 000) of Multiple Sclerosis
131   II,     5.  5.  3|              5.3.5.3. Prevalence (per 100 000) of Multiple Sclerosis
132   II,     5.  5.  3|               5.3.5.4. Incidence (per 100 000/year) of Multiple Sclerosis
133   II,     5.  5.  3|         significantly from 3 to 6 per 100 000 per year in the western
134   II,     5.  5.  3|        prevalence in France is 65 per 100 000 (Vukusic et al, 2007),
135   II,     5.  5.  3|           Prevalence of 39 and 21 per 100 000 has been reported for
136   II,     5.  5.  3|            from approx. 20 to 190 per 100 000. Mean rates are higher
137   II,     5.  5.  3|         ranges between 11 and 282 per 100 000 in women and between
138   II,     5.  5.  3|            and between 10 and 123 per 100 000 in men, with female:
139   II,     5.  5.  3|              is estimated to be 4 per 100 000, with peaks registered
140   II,     5.  5.  3|           ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 per 100 000 as reported by WHO for
141   II,     5.  5.  3|          However, rates up to 3.6 per 100 000 are reported in the
142   II,     5.  5.  3|               5.3.5.7. Mortality (per 100 000) of MS patients in selected
143   II,     5.  5.  3|           prevalence (MSA:1.86 to 4.9/100.000, PSP: 2.5 to 7.5/100.
144   II,     5.  5.  3|              100.000, PSP: 2.5 to 7.5/100.000; CGD: 4.0/100.000, respectively (
145   II,     5.  5.  3|              to 7.5/100.000; CGD: 4.0/100.000, respectively (Nath
146   II,     5.  5.  3|          older age groups (>85y; 2205/100.000), however, approximately
147   II,     5.  5.  3|               estimates varied from 5/100,000 to 346/100,000. The
148   II,     5.  5.  3|          varied from 5/100,000 to 346/100,000. The latter estimate
149   II,     5.  5.  3|               considerably, from 65.6/100,000 in Sardinia (Rosati
150   II,     5.  5.  3|         Rosati et al, 1980) to 12,500/100,000 for institutionalised
151   II,     5.  5.  3|              approximately 120 to 257/100,000 and 11 to 19/100,000
152   II,     5.  5.  3|              257/100,000 and 11 to 19/100,000 per year, respectively.
153   II,     5.  5.  3|           much higher: 1,280 to 1,500/100,000 and 346/100,000, respectively.
154   II,     5.  5.  3|              to 1,500/100,000 and 346/100,000, respectively. The large
155   II,     5.  5.  3|              in rates (65.6 to 12,500/100,000) may be the consequence
156   II,     5.  5.  3|          highest prevalence of 12,500/100,000 was obtained from a
157   II,     5.  5.  3|               Europe range from 5 per 100,000 to 26 per 100,000, according
158   II,     5.  5.  3|               5 per 100,000 to 26 per 100,000, according to the identified
159   II,     5.  5.  3|             incidence rate of 326 per 100,000 for people aged 65-84 (
160   II,     5.  5.  3|         clinico-pathological study of 100 cases. Journal of neurology,
161   II,     5.  6.  3|               50 and 140 procedures / 100,000 (Merx et al, 2003).
162   II,     5.  6.  3|             of RA range from 413 per 100,000 for adult males and
163   II,     5.  6.  3|             adult males and 13-36 per 100,000 for adult females. Estimates
164   II,     5.  6.  3|             with age, with rates of 2/100,000 person-years in women
165   II,     5.  6.  3|               under 35,rising to 3032/100,000 person-years in women
166   II,     5.  7.  1|             patients with ESRD have a 100 times higher risk (Baigent
167   II,     5.  7.  5|          Health established a list of 100 public health objectives;
168   II,     5.  8.  3|             41 300 lost work days per 100 000 population are due to
169   II,     5.  8.  7|             Studies. Respir Med 2006; 100: 264-272.~ ~Lindberg A,
170   II,     5.  8.  7|          population. Respir Med 2006; 100: 1973-1980.~ ~Mohangoo AD,
171   II,     5.  8.  7|           with COPD. Respir Med 2006; 100: 1349-1355.~ ~Viegi G, Pedreschi
172   II,     5.  9.  3|         Standardized Death Rates (per 100,000 people) in all EU Countries
173   II,     5. 11.  3|              is likely not to protect 100% of sensitized people from
174   II,     5. 11.  3|               disease that affects 85-100% of people at some time
175   II,     5. 11.  3|             new cases of melanoma per 100,000. Many cancer registries
176   II,     5. 11.  3|               skinned population (per 100 000).~ ~ ~There is little
177   II,     5. 11.  3|              incidence rate of 88 per 100 000 for BCC, of 29 per 100
178   II,     5. 11.  3|            100 000 for BCC, of 29 per 100 000 for SCC and 14 per 100
179   II,     5. 11.  3|            100 000 for SCC and 14 per 100 000 for melanoma (de Rijke
180   II,     5. 12.  1|         mortality rates (around 30-40/100,000 men and 10-16/100,000
181   II,     5. 12.  1|              40/100,000 men and 10-16/100,000 women) in Europe were
182   II,     5. 12.  1|             the lowest ones (below 10/100,000 men and 5/100,000 women)
183   II,     5. 12.  1|            below 10/100,000 men and 5/100,000 women) were registered
184   II,     5. 12.  1|         Europe reaching rates over 58/100,000 men and 22/100,000 women
185   II,     5. 12.  1|            over 58/100,000 men and 22/100,000 women in Hungary in
186   II,     5. 12.  2|            Age-standardized rates per 100,000 population, at all ages
187   II,     5. 12.  3|              rates from cirrhosis per 100,000 men at all ages and
188   II,     5. 12.  3|           Europe, i.e. Portugal (38.7/100,000), Italy (35.0), France (
189   II,     5. 12.  3|            the England and Wales (3.6/100,000), Ireland (3.4), Norway
190   II,     5. 12.  3|               rates between 12 and 15/100,000, and Portugal of around
191   II,     5. 12.  3|             and Portugal of around 18/100,000. Similar declines were
192   II,     5. 12.  3|               rates were around 10-13/100,000 men in the early 1980s
193   II,     5. 12.  3|              early 1980s and around 5/100,000 in 2000-02. Consequently,
194   II,     5. 12.  3|               rates remained around 5/100,000 men throughout all the
195   II,     5. 12.  3|             27-34 in 1980-82 to 18-20/100,000 in 2000-02, and even
196   II,     5. 12.  3|           rates in 2000-02 were 31-35/100,000 men. Eight European
197   II,     5. 12.  3|            from 11.3 in 1980-82 to 15/100,000 in 2000-2002, Finland
198   II,     5. 12.  3|        truncated rates reaching 172.2/100,000 men in Hungary and 106.
199   II,     5. 12.  3|            middle-aged men (around 75/100,000).~Mortality rates from
200   II,     5. 12.  3|            rates in 2000-02 were 22.6/100,000 in Romania, followed
201   II,     5. 12.  3|              the lowest ones, below 2/100,000, were in Greece and
202   II,     5. 12.  3|            values for women were 53.9/100,000 in Hungary and 44.3
203   II,     5. 12.  3|               cirrhosis (around 24-30/100,000).~ ~Table 5.12.2. Age-adjusted (
204   II,     5. 12.  3|              rates from cirrhosis per 100,000 women at all ages and
205   II,     5. 12.  7|       consumption. Int J Epidemiol 26:100-109.~ ~Corrao G, Aricò S (
206   II,     5. 14.  2|             The number and rates (per 100,000 population) of active
207   II,     5. 14.  2|           care clinical providers per 100,000 population.~Denominator:
208   II,     5. 15.  2|              textual information on 2 100 of them. The RD included
209   II,     5. 15.  3|          between 1 in 10 000 and 1 in 100 000. Another 1 000 RD have
210   II,     6.  3.  3|               Iceland with 552.45 per 100 000, followed by Denmark
211   II,     6.  3.  3|               Denmark with 441.29 per 100 000. Available data show
212   II,     6.  3.  3|         levels of up to 200 cases per 100 000 per year in 1995, to
213   II,     6.  3.  3|              in 1995, to below 40 per 100 000 per year in 2004. In
214   II,     6.  3.  3|         observed in the UK (33.98 per 100 000), followed by Latvia (
215   II,     6.  3.  3|         followed by Latvia (30.09 per 100 000) and the lowest in Luxembourg (
216   II,     6.  3.  3|               in Luxembourg (0.22 per 100 000), followed by Spain
217   II,     6.  3.  3|          Portugal (both with 0.42 per 100 000). However, different
218   II,     6.  3.  3|             just under 3.5 to 2.2 per 100 000 per year in 2000, but
219   II,     6.  3.  3|           since then reaching 3.1 per 100 000 per year in 2004, mainly
220   II,     6.  3.  3|              1990s (over 60 cases per 100 000 per year in 1995), a
221   II,     6.  3.  3|           remained below 10 cases per 100 000 per year, with an overall
222   II,     6.  3.  3|         recorded in Latvia (19.21 per 100 000), Lithuania (8.61 per
223   II,     6.  3.  3|             000), Lithuania (8.61 per 100 000) and Estonia (8.24 per
224   II,     6.  3.  3|            000) and Estonia (8.24 per 100 000), with the 2544 age
225   II,     6.  3.  3|             from 6.6 to 2.6 cases per 100 000 per year over the period.
226   II,     6.  3.  3|        reported by Iceland (11.24 per 100 000), followed by Latvia (
227   II,     6.  3.  3|          followed by Latvia (7.37 per 100 000). Incidence was higher
228   II,     6.  3.  3|       increased steadily from 7.0 per 100 000 per year in 2001, to
229   II,     6.  3.  3|              year in 2001, to 7.9 per 100 000 per year in 2004, but
230   II,     6.  3.  3|           highest incidence rates per 100 000 per year were reported
231   II,     6.  3.  4|            have remained below 20 per 100 000 per year since 2001
232   II,     6.  3.  4|            Figure 6.A1.1 TB cases per 100,000 selected countries and
233   II,     6.  3.  4|             an overall rate of 13 per 100 000 per year, with a countrywide
234   II,     6.  3.  4|            notification rate (135 per 100 000 per year in 2005) and
235   II,     6.  3.  4|              stable at around one per 100 000 per year. In 2005, a
236   II,     6.  3.  4|         highest incidence of 3.36 per 100 000 per year was seen in
237   II,     6.  3.  4|              by Iceland with 2.38 per 100 000 per year. In 2005, 746
238   II,     6.  3.  5|        between five and six cases per 100 000 per year, but this is
239   II,     6.  3.  5|         between one and two cases per 100 000 per year. Good vaccines
240   II,     6.  3.  5|     pneumococcal infections (5.83 per 100 000 per year) were reported
241   II,     6.  3.  5|          countries. Sweden (15.76 per 100 000) followed by Belgium (
242   II,     6.  3.  5|        followed by Belgium (15.45 per 100 000) reported the highest
243   II,     6.  3.  5|           over-65 age group (15.3 per 100 000), followed by the under-4
244   II,     6.  3.  5|           under-4 age group (14.1 per 100 000), while the incidence
245   II,     6.  3.  5|              incidence varied below 2/100 000 per year with stable
246   II,     6.  3.  5|                Ireland (with 4.94 per 100 000) and Malta (2.73 per
247   II,     6.  3.  5|              000) and Malta (2.73 per 100 000) reported the highest
248   II,     6.  3.  5|         incidence rate, with 1.48 per 100 000, followed by Sweden (
249   II,     6.  3.  5|          followed by Sweden (1.31 per 100 000). Hib vaccination is
250   II,     6.  3.  5|            the Netherlands (40.17 per 100 000), with Norway reporting
251   II,     6.  3.  5|         reporting a rate of 19.10 per 100 000. By contrast, the overall
252   II,     6.  3.  5|           rate in the EU was 4.10 per 100 000 per year. Thus pertussis,
253   II,     6.  3.  5|         Latvia peaked in 1995 (15 per 100 000 per year) with a second
254   II,     6.  3.  5|           second peak in 2000 (11 per 100 000 per year). In Estonia
255   II,     6.  3.  5|              an incidence of 0.87 per 100 000.~ ~Tetanus~ ~Tetanus
256   II,     6.  3.  5|             were always below 0.2 per 100 000 per year in the EU15
257   II,     6.  3.  5|             rates were below 0.35 per 100 000 per year, except for
258   II,     6.  3.  5|             incidence was at 0.45 per 100 000 per year in 2000 (nine
259   II,     6.  3.  5|            and for Malta with 0.5 per 100 000 per year in 2002 (two
260   II,     6.  3.  5|               were in Malta (0.25 per 100 000), followed by Italy (
261   II,     6.  3.  5|           followed by Italy (0.11 per 100 000).~ ~
262   II,     6.  3.  5|              years from almost 35 per 100 000 per year before 1997
263   II,     6.  3.  5|              1997 to less than 10 per 100 000 per year after 1998 (
264   II,     6.  3.  5|               between five and 42 per 100 000 per year. In the other
265   II,     6.  3.  5|     fluctuated between one and 10 per 100 000 per year since 2000.~ ~
266   II,     6.  3.  5|      incidence in the EU was 0.28 per 100 000 per year and the highest
267   II,     6.  3.  5|             and the highest rates per 100 000 were reported by Ireland (
268   II,     6.  3.  5|            rates (77.24 and 28.95 per 100 000, respectively). In those
269   II,     6.  3.  5|               countries was 17.65 per 100 000 per year.~ ~Rubella~ ~
270   II,     6.  3.  5|        overall incidence was 0.51 per 100 000 per year, with Lithuania (
271   II,     6.  3.  5|              with Lithuania (3.44 per 100 000) and the Netherlands (
272   II,     6.  3.  5|             the Netherlands (2.23 per 100 000) reporting the highest
273   II,     6.  3.  6|               Czech Republic (296 per 100 000), followed by the UK (
274   II,     6.  3.  6|         followed by the UK (87.95 per 100 000). Campylobacteriosis
275   II,     6.  3.  6|               Czech Republic (322 per 100 000), followed by Slovakia (
276   II,     6.  3.  6|               by Slovakia (223.67 per 100 000). The highest incidence
277   II,     6.  3.  6|      countries. Norway, with 0.87 per 100 000, reported the highest
278   II,     6.  3.  6|          followed by the UK (0.79 per 100 000).~ ~Shigellosis~ ~Shigellosis
279   II,     6.  3.  6|           incidence rate was 1.82 per 100 000, with the highest incidence
280   II,     6.  3.  6|           than five year-old (3.5 per 100 000), representing 10% of
281   II,     6.  3.  6|           cases. Lithuania (13.43 per 100 000 total population), followed
282   II,     6.  3.  6|        followed by Slovakia (9.51 per 100 000) reported the highest
283   II,     6.  3.  6|             Czech Republic (16.72 per 100 000) followed by Sweden (
284   II,     6.  3.  6|          followed by Sweden (4.27 per 100 000) reported the highest
285   II,     6.  3.  6|             with Lithuania (14.63 per 100 000) followed by Finland (
286   II,     6.  3.  6|         followed by Finland (12.2 per 100 000) reporting the highest
287   II,     6.  3.  6|      incidence in the EU was 2.23 per 100 000 per year, with children
288   II,     6.  3.  6|           highest incidence (30.4 per 100 000 per year).~ ~Listeriosis~ ~
289   II,     6.  3.  6|           incidence in 2004 (0.28 per 100 000 per year) was similar
290   II,     6.  3.  6|               2005. Denmark (0.85 per 100 000), followed by Finland (
291   II,     6.  3.  6|         followed by Finland (0.69 per 100 000) reported the highest
292   II,     6.  3.  6|           under 4 000 cases (0.87 per 100 000)) to 2004 (1 743 cases (
293   II,     6.  3.  6|           2004 (1 743 cases (0.38 per 100 000)). Twenty-six countries
294   II,     6.  3.  6|         overall incidence of 0.31 per 100 000. Portugal (1.40 per
295   II,     6.  3.  6|               000. Portugal (1.40 per 100 000), followed by Ireland (
296   II,     6.  3.  6|         followed by Ireland (1.29 per 100 000) reported the highest
297   II,     6.  3.  6|           highest incidence (0.15 per 100 000).~ ~Cholera~ ~Cholera
298   II,     6.  3.  6|              were reported ( 0.01 per 100 000 per year). In 2005,
299   II,     6.  3.  6|         countries. Slovakia (9.81 per 100 000) and Latvia (6.29 per
300   II,     6.  3.  6|             000) and Latvia (6.29 per 100 000) are the only countries
301   II,     6.  3.  6|      incidences of more than five per 100 000 per year. The highest
302   II,     6.  3.  6|            observed in 1995 (1.68 per 100 000 per year), and has shown
303   II,     6.  3.  6|              with Lithuania (6.86 per 100 000), followed by Slovakia (
304   II,     6.  3.  6|        followed by Slovakia (4.85 per 100 000) reporting the highest
305   II,     6.  3.  6|         countries. Estonia (24.28 per 100 000), followed by Iceland (
306   II,     6.  3.  6|        followed by Iceland (14.65 per 100 000) reported the highest
307   II,     6.  3.  6|               with Ireland (13.75 per 100 000) and the UK (9.26 per
308   II,     6.  3.  6|             000) and the UK (9.26 per 100 000) reporting the highest
309   II,     6.  3.  6|        countries. Lithuania (0.44 per 100 000), followed by Slovenia (
310   II,     6.  3.  6|        followed by Slovenia (0.30 per 100 000), reported the highest
311   II,     6.  3.  6|           countries. Latvia (2.12 per 100 000), followed by Lithuania (
312   II,     6.  3.  6|       followed by Lithuania (0.35 per 100 000) reported the highest
313   II,     6.  3.  7|           countries. Sweden (2.73 per 100 000), followed by Hungary (
314   II,     6.  3.  7|         followed by Hungary (0.86 per 100 000) reported the highest
315   II,     6.  3.  7|         between 0.2 and 0.5 cases per 100 000. In 2005, 958 cases
316   II,     6.  3.  7|             incidence rates (0.49 per 100 000 and 0.48 per 100 000,
317   II,     6.  3.  7|              per 100 000 and 0.48 per 100 000, respectively). This
318   II,     6.  3.  7|            from 0.1 to 0.22 cases per 100 000. The lowest number of
319   II,     6.  3.  7|                with Estonia (0.82 per 100 000) followed by France (
320   II,     6.  3.  7|          followed by France (0.77 per 100 000) reporting the highest
321   II,     6.  3.  7|          ranged from 1.45 to 2.27 per 100 000 per year, with a steady
322   II,     6.  4.  4|           budget of € 16 million with 100 staff. The Centre’s budget
323   II,     7.  3.  2|              is estimated that almost 100 000 lives could be saved
324   II,     7.  3.  2|           males (72 injury deaths per 100 000 males) than it is for
325   II,     7.  3.  2|             it is for females (35 per 100 000 females). As a result,
326   II,     7.  3.  2|         Figure 7.3. Injury deaths per 100 000 by sex and age group,
327   II,     7.  3.  3|        discharges due to injuries per 100 000 inhabitants in the EU27
328   II,     7.  3.  4|             the EU27 range from 4 per 100 000 inhabitants in Malta
329   II,     7.  3.  4|               They range from 0.3 per 100 000 inhabitants in the United
330   II,     7.  3.  4|       accidents in the EU27 is 22 per 100,000 residents and is more
331   II,     7.  3.  4|            terms every year more than 100 000 EU citizens die from
332   II,     7.  3.  5|           rates vary from about 2 per 100 000 people in Cyprus to
333   II,     7.  3.  5|            people in Cyprus to 35 per 100 000 in Lithuania (Figure
334   II,     7.  7    |          Standardised Death Rate (per 100 000 inhabitants), Suicide
335   II,     7.  7    |          Standardised Death Rate (per 100 000 inhabitants), Homicide,
336   II,     9        |             Region before age 65, per 100.000 population.~ ~ ~ ~Source:
337   II,     9.  1    |         frequently - only 5 to 15 per 100 000 live births – but are
338   II,     9.  1.  1|             of developing CP is 60 to 100 times higher in VLBW babies/
339   II,     9.  1.  2|    participating from 3% (Germany) to 100% (Norway, Sweden, Finland,
340   II,     9.  3.  1|             Work, 2007). Injuries per 100 000 are particularly high
341   II,     9.  3.  1|             age group (median 3.9 per 100 000 population), to the
342   II,     9.  3.  1|             25-34 age group (11.2 per 100 000 population), followed
343   II,     9.  3.  1|             35-44 age group (39.2 per 100 000 population) (White and
344   II,     9.  3.  1|           from 2.1 to 4.6 to 16.0 per 100 000 population across the
345   II,     9.  3.  1|             among men: in Europe, per 100 000 population, Sweden had
346   II,     9.  3.  1|                 Arthritis . More than 100 million European citizens
347   II,     9.  3.  1|             Region before age 65, per 100.000 population.~ ~ ~ ~Source:
348   II,     9.  3.  2|               certainly no fewer than 100 000. For smaller countries,
349   II,     9.  3.  2|          about 20 maternal deaths per 100 000 live births in the early
350   II,     9.  3.  2|           early 1980s to 7 deaths per 100 000. The most significant
351   II,     9.  3.  2|               between 140 and 160 per 100 000 in the 1980s. After
352   II,     9.  3.  2|              ratio declined to 26 per 100 000 in 2002-2004, still
353   II,     9.  4.  3|       population aged 0-14 years [per 100]) shows that Italy is the ‘
354   II,     9.  4.  3|               men and 1,318 women per 100 000) and Lithuania (2,219
355   II,     9.  5.  3|             the Netherlands (33.5 per 100 000) and Latvia (33.2) (
356   II,     9.  5.  3|             the Netherlands (30.8 per 100.000). (WHO HFA-DB, 2006).
357  III,    10.  2.  1|         Global Tobacco Epidemic 2008, 100 million people worldwide
358  III,    10.  2.  1|           quitting rate by another 50-100% (Fiore et al, 2000). Psychosocial
359  III,    10.  2.  1|               of the scale maximum of 100. This increase is mainly
360  III,    10.  2.  1|     approximately 90 extra deaths per 100,000 people for men and 60
361  III,    10.  2.  1|             people for men and 60 per 100,000 for women (as well as
362  III,    10.  2.  1|      estimated that there are between 100 000 and 200 000 former or
363  III,    10.  2.  1|                there might be between 100 000 and 200 000 people living
364  III,    10.  2.  1|             EU, accounting for 46% to 100%16.Other substances identified
365  III,    10.  2.  1|          Public Health Reports, 1985, 100:126-131.~ ~EORG (2003):
366  III,    10.  2.  1|           Behavioural Medicine, 25(2):100104.~ ~European Commission (
367  III,    10.  2.  1|       products, EU15, 1995-2002 (1995=100)~ ~Figure 10.2.1.7.6. Average
368  III,    10.  2.  4|             tests (i.e., tests with 0-100% probability being a continuum
369  III,    10.  3.  1|           radon in dwellings leads to 100 to 1200 extra cases of lung
370  III,    10.  3.  1|           UV-B (280-315 nm) and UV-C (100-280 nm). UVR reaching the
371  III,    10.  3.  1|          Frequency Fields (RF fields, 100 kHz <f 300 GHz), including
372  III,    10.  3.  1|         Fields, (IF fields, 300 Hz <f 100 kHz), experimental and epidemiological
373  III,    10.  3.  4|               people reported killed, 100 people reported affected,
374  III,    10.  3.  4|          Estimated total damages of a 100-year flood are projected
375  III,    10.  3.  4|              10 or more killed and/or 100 or more affected are included
376  III,    10.  4.  1|      considered to be responsible for 100 000 deaths and 750 000 life
377  III,    10.  4.  2|           Campylobacteriosis~51.6 per 100 000~Increasing (7.8% in
378  III,    10.  4.  2|          water~Salmonellosis~35.0 per 100 000~Decreasing in eggs over
379  III,    10.  4.  2|      incidence rate of 51.6 cases per 100,000 people and to a total
380  III,    10.  4.  2|     significant risk to human health (100 bacteria/g). However, in
381  III,    10.  4.  2|         findings and samples over the 100 cfu/g limit were made indicating
382  III,    10.  4.  2|           Netherlands to PAHs, ~about 100-200 ng per~person per day ~
383  III,    10.  4.  2|       Ecotoxicol Environ Saf Vol. 63: 100-7~ ~RIVM (2006):Our Food,
384  III,    10.  4.  3|             In Western Europea almost 100% of the population have
385  III,    10.  4.  3|               age fell from 70.0 (per 100 000) to 21.6 in the Commonwealth
386  III,    10.  4.  3|        particularly in Asia with over 100 million people affected.
387  III,    10.  4.  3|               level is in the range 1/100-1/1000 (Vahter et al, 2006).
388  III,    10.  4.  3|                 At 50 μg/l the risk 1/100 which is 100 times higher
389  III,    10.  4.  3|               the risk 1/100 which is 100 times higher than for any
390  III,    10.  4.  3|             In Western Europe, almost 100% of the population has had
391  III,    10.  5.  2|              the stroke incidence per 100.000 citizens is much higher
392  III,    10.  5.  3|               is high, probably about 100%. On the other hand, in
393  III,    10.  5.  3|       incidence rate of app. 1800 per 100,000 is reported for the
394  III,    10.  5.  3|          average rates of app. 60 per 100,000.~ ~Table 10.5.3.2. Number
395  III,    10.  5.  3|    compensation schemes, the rate per 100,000 insured people varied
396  III,    10.  5.  3|         serious accidents at work per 100 thousand persons in employment
397  III,    10.  5.  3|           economic activity (rate per 100 000 workers)~ ~Perception
398  III,    10.  5.  3|            occupational accidents per 100.000 workers in the EU27.~
399  III,    10.  5.  3|           Policy Implications (pp. 73-100). Oxford: Oxford University
400   IV,    11.  1.  3|            capita increased by almost 100% between 1990 and 2004,
401   IV,    11.  1.  6|     fee-for-service for private work.~100% by salary for public patients;
402   IV,    11.  1.  6| fee-for-service for private patients.~100% by salary for public patients,
403   IV,    11.  1.  6| fee-for-service for private patients.~100% by fee-for-service.~Estonia~
404   IV,    11.  1.  6|              Fee-for-service.~Germany~100% by fee-for-service.~100%
405   IV,    11.  1.  6|              100% by fee-for-service.~100% by fee-for-service.~Salary.
406   IV,    11.  1.  6| Fee-for-service for private patients.~100% by salary.~Greece~Salary
407   IV,    11.  1.  6|        payments for preventive care).~100% by fee-for-service.~ ~100%
408   IV,    11.  1.  6|            100% by fee-for-service.~ ~100% by salary.~ ~Fee-for-service.~ ~
409   IV,    11.  1.  6|             and 15% from capitation).~100% by salary.~ ~100% by salary.~ ~
410   IV,    11.  1.  6|        capitation).~100% by salary.~ ~100% by salary.~ ~Mainly by
411   IV,    11.  1.  6|                  Sweden~Salary~Salary~100% by salary~100% by salary~
412   IV,    11.  1.  6|          Salary~Salary~100% by salary~100% by salary~Switzerland~96%
413   IV,    11.  2.  1|      hospitals declined from 3.82 per 100,000 population in 1990 to
414   IV,    11.  2.  1|           Number of hospital beds per 100,000 population, 2007 or
415   IV,    11.  2.  1|           with over 25 admissions per 100 population. Moreover, there
416   IV,    11.  2.  1|               of psychiatric beds per 100,000 population, 1996-2005 (
417   IV,    11.  3.  1|             almost 500 physicians per 100,000 population. High density
418   IV,    11.  3.  1|         dentists, and pharmacists per 100,000 population, 2006 or
419   IV,    11.  3.  1|         Netherlands (1,454 nurses per 100,000 population), with high
420   IV,    11.  3.  1|            also in Belgium (1,341 per 100,000), and in particularly
421   IV,    11.  3.  1|         Norway (over 1,500 nurses per 100,000).~ ~Educational paths
422   IV,    11.  6.  2|           Twenty years ago there were 100 funds, while currently there
423   IV,    11.  6.  2|         maximums, ranging from about €100 in Sweden to about €600
424   IV,    11.  6.  4|        insurance funds, respectively) 100% of funds are redistributed;
425   IV,    11.  6.  4|               current level of 60% to 100% by 2009 (Thomson, Foubister
426   IV,    11.  6.  4|               Insurance (RIZIV/INAMI)~100 competitive sickness funds~
427   IV,    11.  6.  4|              all OECD countries cover 100% or almost 100% of the population
428   IV,    11.  6.  4|        countries cover 100% or almost 100% of the population to statutory
429   IV,    12.  2    |           quitting rate by another 50-100%. Psychosocial interventions
430   IV,    12. 10    |       Ministerial Decisions 34258 and 100 (published in 2002) concerning
431   IV,    12. 10    |               The 2004 law has set up 100 objectives in the various
432   IV,    12. 10    |            sexual crime (all ages), n/100,000 inhabitants~ ~Reported
433   IV,    12. 10    |          rapes of persons 15 years, n/100,000 inhabitants~Domain of
434   IV,    13.  2.  3|  Cardiovascular diseases, all cancers~100,000-300,000~5 dietary factors
435   IV,    13.  2.  3|     alcohol-dependency~ ~ ~ ~ ~30,000-100,000~Excess of trans fatty
436   IV,    13.  6.  2|             statistics on doctors per 100,000 population, within which