Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  3    |          The magnitude and serious medical and social consequences
  2    I,     2. 10.  2|  nanoparticles applications in the medical field include molecular
  3    I,     2. 10.  3|           functionalities, such as medical emergency data and secure
  4    I,     2. 10.  4|           pharmaceutical products, medical devices, patients, caregivers,
  5    I,     2. 10.  4|         and every pack of drugs or medical device, which in turn will
  6    I,     2. 10.  4|           adverse events involving medical devices. In Spain, an Adverse
  7    I,     2. 10.  4|        identification for drugs or medical device, where appropriate,
  8    I,     2. 10.  4|            Most pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers and
  9    I,     2. 10.  5|          cost-effectiveness of new medical technologies. HTA approaches
 10   II,     4.  3    |   Gerontology A Biological Science Medical Science 59A(6): 590-597.~ ~
 11   II,     5.  1.  1|       different treatment. Certain medical conditions such as acromegaly
 12   II,     5.  1.  2|    centeredness~ ~More than 80% of medical consultations are due to
 13   II,     5.  1.  2|         financial coverage through medical insurances, as well as the
 14   II,     5.  1.  2|           epidemiological data and medical education which are promoted
 15   II,     5.  1.  2|     national health organizations, medical schools, schools of nursing
 16   II,     5.  1.  3|           the long-term follow-up. Medical schools are lagging behind
 17   II,     5.  2.  2|     Kuulasmaa et al, 2000) and CVD medical care (Tunstall-Pedoe et
 18   II,     5.  2.  2|     morbidity and future trends in medical care.~The ICD codes for
 19   II,     5.  2.  3|     morbidity and future trends in medical care.~ ~Table 5.2.2. Crude
 20   II,     5.  2.  4|            use, physical activity, medical care and genetic and environmental
 21   II,     5.  2.  5|           and are eligible for low medical care expenditures in the
 22   II,     5.  2.  6|        prognosis and variations in medical practice, leading to wrong
 23   II,     5.  2.  6|            surgery. Innovations in medical, invasive and biological
 24   II,     5.  3.Acr|          ESMO~European Society for Medical Oncology~EUROCHIP~European
 25   II,     5.  3.Acr|           LE~Life Expectancy~MOSES~Medical Oncology Status in Europe
 26   II,     5.  3.  2|        e.g. pathology departments, medical records and radiotherapy
 27   II,     5.  3.  2|           The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) addresses
 28   II,     5.  3.  2|        ESMO performed the ‘MOSES’ (Medical Oncology Status in Europe
 29   II,     5.  3.  2|    information about the status of medical oncology in Europe through
 30   II,     5.  3.  2|            teaching and continuing medical education, existing facilities,
 31   II,     5.  3.  7|            oncology (particularly, medical oncology) and the current
 32   II,     5.  3.  7|        care.~· The organization of medical oncology in the different
 33   II,     5.  3.  7|       restricted to specialists in medical oncology.~· The role of
 34   II,     5.  3.  7|        oncology.~· The role of the medical oncologist in the multidisciplinary
 35   II,     5.  3.  7|         increasing number of young medical oncological groups are present
 36   II,     5.  3.  7|         integrated into the larger medical oncology community.~ ~The
 37   II,     5.  3.  7|         small indication with high medical need (at a high price),
 38   II,     5.  3.  9|          v128-v149.~ ~ESMO (2006): Medical Oncology Status in Europe
 39   II,     5.  4.  2|      technical level, computerised medical records may be harmonised
 40   II,     5.  4.  2|        Organised activities of the medical services in active partnership
 41   II,     5.  4.  2|       available: non traumatic but medical) in diabetic patients /100,
 42   II,     5.  4.  5|      different treatments. Certain medical conditions such as acromegaly
 43   II,     5.  4.  8|         Ostman J., Excess costs of medical care 1 and 8 years after
 44   II,     5.  5.Int|       activities. More appropriate medical training, increased social
 45   II,     5.  5.  3|         hand, data from the Nordic Medical Statistical Committee (NOMESCO,
 46   II,     5.  5.  3|      adjusted odds ratios for main medical conditions in women and
 47   II,     5.  5.  3|  state-of-the-art treatment in all medical settings;~· train psychiatrists
 48   II,     5.  5.  3|        Jones L, Woolson RF (2006): Medical comorbidity in women and
 49   II,     5.  5.  3|            Journal of the American Medical Association 291:25812590.~
 50   II,     5.  5.  3|  psychiatrists have less access to medical services for their patients?
 51   II,     5.  5.  3|       Finland. American Journal of Medical Genetics 74 (4):353-60.~
 52   II,     5.  5.  3|         Sweden~Adults ~Multisource medical register review~713 ~5.5 ~
 53   II,     5.  5.  3|          years - = 6-12 years MR = Medical record P = Pediatricians ~ =
 54   II,     5.  5.  3|          General practitioner; MF: Medical facilities; SMR: Standardized
 55   II,     5.  5.  3|          Records were taken of any medical event occurring in a 1-2
 56   II,     5.  5.  3|             II 120 months (no AED) Medical examination required~____ __~
 57   II,     5.  5.  3|             Johannessen SI (2004): Medical risks in epilepsy: a review
 58   II,     5.  5.  3|            time setting, access to medical care, number of neurologists,
 59   II,     5.  5.  3|         with regard to the type of medical support they were able to
 60   II,     5.  5.  3|            and administrators, the medical profession, the corporate
 61   II,     5.  5.  3|           are endorsed by both the medical and patient community;~·
 62   II,     5.  5.  3|    represented within the European Medical Agency (EMEA), the European
 63   II,     5.  5.  3|            in society. Advances in medical research, the creation of
 64   II,     5.  5.  3|          Association~EMEA~European Medical Agency~EMSP~European Multiple
 65   II,     5.  5.  3|        studies were performed with medical students or GPs. Keeping
 66   II,     5.  5.  3|         those working as teachers, medical workers, or social service
 67   II,     5.  5.  3|          delivering cost-effective medical care represents an enormous
 68   II,     5.  6.  1|     Swedish Yearbook of Health and Medical Care, 2001).~ ~The burden
 69   II,     5.  6.  3|     Swedish Yearbook of Health and Medical Care, 2001).~ ~In the Netherlands,
 70   II,     5.  6.  3|         This study only considered medical costs. The inclusion of
 71   II,     5.  6.  3|    two-thirds were direct costs of medical care (Levy et al, 1993).
 72   II,     5.  6.  4|     complaints are the most common medical causes of long term absence,
 73   II,     5.  6.  6|         Rheumatology. Australasian Medical Publishing Company Limited,
 74   II,     5.  6.  6|             Yearbook of Health and Medical Care 2001. Available at
 75   II,     5.  6.  6|       comparison of population and medical perceptions of treatment
 76   II,     5.  7.  3|        been gathered both by using medical databases (Ireland, England,
 77   II,     5.  7.  3|      population surveys. Data from medical databases overestimate the
 78   II,     5.  7.  3|           3 to 1.5 times higher in medical databases in Ireland, England
 79   II,     5.  7.  3|            figures are reported in medical databases (Stevens et al,
 80   II,     5.  7.  3|        been gathered both by using medical databases (Ireland, England,
 81   II,     5.  7.  3|      population surveys. Data from medical databases overestimate the
 82   II,     5.  7.  3|           3 to 1.5 times higher in medical databases in Ireland, England
 83   II,     5.  7.  6|      clinical data from electronic medical records and by bringing
 84   II,     5.  7.  7|          ADA) (2006): Standards of medical care in diabetes-2006. Diabetes
 85   II,     5.  7.  7|            Annual Report. Academic Medical Center, Department of Medical
 86   II,     5.  7.  7|      Medical Center, Department of Medical Informatics, Amsterdam,
 87   II,     5.  7.  7|           Brown JB (2004): Cost of medical care for chronic kidney
 88   II,     5.  8.  3|       California Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program, a comprehensive
 89   II,     5.  8.  3|          France, the average total medical cost of every COPD patient
 90   II,     5.  8.  3|           based on FEV1. The total medical cost for COPD patients in
 91   II,     5.  8.  3|       accounting for 3.5% of total medical expenditures. In other studies,
 92   II,     5.  8.  4|       means of a large database of medical practitioner records in
 93   II,     5.  8.  7|       mortality: Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program. Chest 2005;
 94   II,     5.  9.  1|           a result, asthma-related medical resource usage may increase
 95   II,     5.  9.  3|          people do not undergo any medical evaluation. In the nine
 96   II,     5.  9.  3|   importance of nowadays available medical tools (educational programs,
 97   II,     5. 10.  2|     classified and reported by the medical community, and are not always
 98   II,     5. 11.  1|            than other more serious medical disorders. The high prevalence
 99   II,     5. 11.  1|            skin disease within the medical profession and give it a
100   II,     5. 11.  1|            than other more serious medical disorders (Ryan et al, 1991).~
101   II,     5. 11.  1|           1991).~Unlike most other medical specialties which usually
102   II,     5. 11.  1|        disease which benefits from medical care is very common, affecting
103   II,     5. 11.  3|         professionals as a serious medical condition, it can have a
104   II,     5. 11.  3|           M Carnes, Body Piercing. Medical Concerns with Cutting-Edge
105   II,     5. 11.  3|      prevalence thought to warrant medical care with 7.3%, 3.4% 8.9%
106   II,     5. 11.  3|           individuals receive good medical advice regarding the most
107   II,     5. 11.  4|      people with more traditionalmedicaldisorders such as angina
108   II,     5. 11.  7|    conditions and related need for medical care among persons 174
109   II,     5. 11.  7|           of prevalence and use of medical care. Brit J Prev Soc Med
110   II,     5. 11.  7|          series. Oxford: Radcliffe Medical Press 1997.~ ~Williams H,
111   II,     5. 13    |          society through increased medical costs to treat the diseases
112   II,     5. 15.  3|   conditions where there are unmet medical needs”.~ ~Most rare diseases
113   II,     5. 15.  5|        delivery of health care and medical services in the field of
114   II,     5. 15.  5|           that health services and medical care are not in the European
115   II,     6.  3.  1|            unexpected finding in a medical investigation, or as part
116   II,     6.  3.  4|     workers and those with chronic medical conditions of all ages,
117   II,     6.  3.  6|            persons are not used in medical care.~ ~The transmission
118   II,     7.  2.  1|            death certificates. The medical certification of death is
119   II,     7.  2.  9|            provide figures for the medical costs of injuries.~htt ~ ~
120   II,     7.  3.  1|     Outpatients~- 18 300 000 Other medical Treatment~ ~· This corresponds
121   II,     7.  3.  5|           severe enough to require medical attention and – even among
122   II,     7.  4.  1|        youths are being treated in medical centres for traumatic injuries
123   II,     7.  4.  2|         excess share in the direct medical costs~ ~Every year approximately
124   II,     7.  4.  2|            10 elderly will receive medical treatment due to an injury
125   II,     7.  4.  4|     million interventions by other medical and paramedical professionals
126   II,     7.  5    |   knowledgeable and skilled staff. Medical professionals can act as
127   II,     7.  5    |           room surveys), and other medical treatments (household surveys
128   II,     7.  6    |          result of improvements of medical treatment ( e.g. trauma
129   II,     7.  7    |          Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical School, Athens University.~ ~
130   II,     7.  7    |          Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical School, Athens University.~ ~
131   II,     8.  1.  1|            were typically cast as “medical” (the result of individual
132   II,     8.  2.  1|      reflect the transition from a medical approach to disability,
133   II,     8.  2.  1|         disadvantaged as dental or medical treatments may be withdrawn
134   II,     8.  2.  1|           be prevented with proper medical care. Children diagnosed
135   II,     8.  2.  1|       Models of good practice – at medical faculties in two universities
136   II,     8.  2.  1| intellectual disabilities. British Medical Journal: In press.~Walsh
137   II,     8.  2.  2|   proportions of costs for running medical and allied health services,
138   II,     8.  2.  3|            may be worsened by some medical conditions such as hypothyroidism,
139   II,     9        |         are usually grouped under “medical genetics”, but the study
140   II,     9        |       factors. Visual performance, medical problems, slowed neurological
141   II,     9.  1    |            improve the efficacy of medical technology and interventions,
142   II,     9.  1    |         efficacy of technology and medical practices and improving
143   II,     9.  1.  1|             derived from civil and medical registers of births and
144   II,     9.  1.  1|         midwives~F: Births without medical intervention~ ~The indicators
145   II,     9.  1.  1|     confidential survey in France. Medical Experts Committee. Eur J
146   II,     9.  1.  2|      quality and financial cost of medical, social and educational
147   II,     9.  1.  2|   anomalies are those with serious medical or functional consequences;
148   II,     9.  1.  2|         but who may have important medical, social or educational needs.~ ~
149   II,     9.  1.  2|         are usually grouped under “medical genetics”, but the study
150   II,     9.  1.  2|            birth registrations and medical records for diagnostic detail
151   II,     9.  1.  2|   Population Based Study", British Medical Journal, Vol 330, pp 574-
152   II,     9.  1.  2|      Anomalies in Europe", British Medical Journal, Vol 331, pp 140-
153   II,     9.  1.  2|      Pollution on Health", British Medical Bulletin, Vol 68, pp 25-
154   II,     9.  1.  2|            defects: results of the Medical Research Council Vitamin
155   II,     9.  2.  2|          therefore highly prone to medical conditions and behaviours
156   II,     9.  2.  3|       sustained injuries requiring medical attention once or more in
157   II,     9.  2.  7|          Why People Smoke. British Medical Journal 328:277-279~ ~Lerner,
158   II,     9.  3.  1|         people with diabetes under medical treatment grew by 43% from
159   II,     9.  3.  1|    diabetes. Of subjects receiving medical care for the disease, women
160   II,     9.  3.  1|        Concern arises also for the medical aspects of ageing. This
161   II,     9.  3.  2|           and the increased use of medical technology in delivery (
162   II,     9.  3.  2|            a set of conditions and medical interventions that have
163   II,     9.  3.  2|       pregnant women and newborns. Medical technologies associated
164   II,     9.  3.  2|           use and success of these medical technologies is an important
165   II,     9.  3.  2|            infertility~Advances in medical technology have improved
166   II,     9.  3.  2|        hospital discharge data and medical birth registers to measure
167   II,     9.  3.  2|           medicine for determining medical practices in the perinatal
168   II,     9.  3.  2|           the best ways to use new medical techniques which have contributed
169   II,     9.  3.  2|           use and benefit from new medical technology without over-medicalising
170   II,     9.  3.  2|      parental anxiety, unnecessary medical interventions and poor use
171   II,     9.  3.  2|     confidential survey in France. Medical Experts Committee. Eur J
172   II,     9.  4.  3|         fractures, but 20% require medical cares. Hip fractures are
173   II,     9.  4.  3|          over 75. More appropriate medical training, increased social
174   II,     9.  4.  3|           receiving genito-urinary medical care at a hospital in the
175   II,     9.  4.  4|       factors. Visual performance, medical problems, slowed neurological
176   II,     9.  4.  5|     attending general hospitals as medical emergencies is formed by
177   II,     9.  4.  5|          receive formal care, i.e. medical or social services. Only
178   II,     9.  4.  5|       people to obtain appropriate medical and long-term care services,
179   II,     9.  4.  6|    intervention and innovations in medical care over the past 50 years
180   II,     9.  4.  7|           of the European Union of Medical~ ~Eurostat (2006): Health.
181   II,     9.  5.  1|     tobacco use), risk taking, and medical care utilisation are major
182   II,     9.  5.  1|      mortalityprimarily through medical advancement, and influenced
183   II,     9.  5.  1|        more susceptible to several medical conditions. More gender
184   II,     9.  5.  3|           changes, assistance with medical equipment and the administration
185   II,     9.  5.  4|           for the slow response of medical science to evidence of gender
186   II,     9.  5.  6|      recovery. American Journal of Medical Science. Oct; 326(4):231-
187   II,     9.  5.  6|          Why People Smoke. British Medical Journal; 328:277 279: 31
188   II,     9.  5.  6|  structures and hierarchies within medical science. Umeå University,
189  III,    10.  2.  1|      Public Policy. Oxford, Oxford Medical Publication, Oxford University
190  III,    10.  2.  1|  Population Based Studies. British Medical Journal, 316: 1636-42.~ ~
191  III,    10.  2.  1| Organisation (SUVA), Department of Medical Economics of the Institute
192  III,    10.  2.  1|            A report from the Chief Medical Officer. London, Department
193  III,    10.  2.  1|          society through increased medical costs to treat the diseases
194  III,    10.  2.  1|      international survey. British Medical Journal 320:1240–1243.~ ~
195  III,    10.  2.  1|        Free and University College Medical School.~[ht ] (report online,
196  III,    10.  2.  1|       misleading [letter]. British Medical Journal 309:57.~ ~Mansour
197  III,    10.  2.  1|      inequality in Europe. British Medical Journal 308:1153–1156.~ ~
198  III,    10.  2.  1|         related diseases. Croatian Medical Journal 45:637-643.~ ~Nutritional
199  III,    10.  2.  4|         secondary data in both the medical and Public Health setting.~ ~
200  III,    10.  2.  4|            taped not only to treat medical conditions, but also to
201  III,    10.  2.  4|           Human Genome Project for Medical Science. J Am Med Ass, 285:
202  III,    10.  3.  3|            persons are not used in medical care.~BSE prion was found
203  III,    10.  4.  5|           Rushton (2003):. British Medical Bulletin, Volume 68: 183-
204  III,    10.  4.  5|          waste management. British Medical Bulletin , Volume 68: 183-
205  III,    10.  5.  1|         leisure injuries requiring medical attention. About 2 million
206  III,    10.  5.  1|            Journal of the American Medical Association, 2001, 285:535–
207  III,    10.  5.  2|      issues, lifestyle choices and medical interventions as those living
208  III,    10.  5.  2|    Research has linked barriers to medical service access also with
209  III,    10.  5.  2|        access to and distance from medical care facilities (GP, hospital
210  III,    10.  5.  2|        facilities (GP, hospital or medical centre) still represents
211  III,    10.  5.  2|          with the accessibility of medical services, and that this
212  III,    10.  5.  2|         regard to the provision of medical services.~Lopez-Abuin et
213  III,    10.  5.  2|     out-of-hour times. The British Medical Association (BMA, 2005)
214  III,    10.  5.  2|            6. References~ ~British Medical Association (2005): Healthcare
215  III,    10.  5.  2|           and structure of primary medical care services and population
216  III,    10.  5.  2|              The use of Electronic Medical Recording in General Practice
217  III,    10.  5.  2|             Acronyms~ ~BMA~British Medical Association~DETR~Department
218  III,    10.  5.  3|     health promotion on the direct medical costs was also studied and
219  III,    10.  5.  3|            an average reduction in medical costs of 26%, the return-on-investment
220  III,    10.  6.  2|           least, the access to the medical system is unevenly distributed
221  III,    10.  6.  2|         and products~6. Health and medical care that more actively
222  III,    10.  6.  2|           to gain insight into the medical and social condition of
223  III,    10.  6.  3|           severe enough to require medical attention and – even among
224   IV,    11.  1.  2|            on public perception of medical errors as well as an earlier
225   IV,    11.  1.  3|            the contribution of the medical profession itself – the
226   IV,    11.  1.  3|        technical sophistication of medical practice. On average, public
227   IV,    11.  1.  5|         audit, quality circles and medical specialty.~ ~Quality indicators
228   IV,    11.  1.  5|          order to disseminate good medical practice, provide comparative
229   IV,    11.  1.  5|            procedures ranging from medical equipment, sterilization
230   IV,    11.  1.  5|      quality, such as the use of a Medical Appropriateness Index which
231   IV,    11.  1.  5|          and laboratory scientist. Medical information and clinical
232   IV,    11.  1.  5|           the risk of harm through medical errors via the promotion
233   IV,    11.  1.  5|       human and financial costs of medical errors. The Agency operates
234   IV,    11.  1.  5|      long-term negative impacts of medical errors. An example comes
235   IV,    11.  1.  5|          from the Missouri Baptist Medical Center in St. Louis, Missouri
236   IV,    11.  1.  5|            both lives and money.~ ~Medical errors~ ~Medical errors
237   IV,    11.  1.  5|          money.~ ~Medical errors~ ~Medical errors present a significant,
238   IV,    11.  1.  5|       attention for policy makers, medical professional and patients.
239   IV,    11.  1.  5|         professional and patients. Medical errors result in approximately
240   IV,    11.  1.  5|      consequences resulting from a medical error. Otherwise, all patients
241   IV,    11.  1.  5|       level of co-morbidities face medical error risks (Weingart et
242   IV,    11.  1.  5|             Weingart et al, 2000). Medical errors have been attributed
243   IV,    11.  1.  5|      healthcare professionals, but medical errors also arise from poor
244   IV,    11.  1.  5|       information systems to track medical error occurrences and difficulties
245   IV,    11.  1.  5|       assessing the actual size of medical errors remains difficult.~ ~
246   IV,    11.  1.  5|            as they lead to greater medical complications or even deaths.
247   IV,    11.  1.  5|           trust in health systems, medical professionals and individual
248   IV,    11.  1.  5|           on public perceptions of medical errors in Europe was released
249   IV,    11.  1.  5|          perceptions associated to medical errors and experiences pertaining
250   IV,    11.  1.  5|           78% of EU citizens found medical errors to be an important
251   IV,    11.  1.  5|          about suffering a serious medical error, Austrians, Swedes
252   IV,    11.  1.  5|           likelihood of perceiving medical errors as an important problem.
253   IV,    11.  1.  5|        have actually experienced a medical error or who have had a
254   IV,    11.  1.  5|         worrying about suffering a medical error. Hospital incidents
255   IV,    11.  1.  5|      confidence that their doctor, medical staff and dentist will not
256   IV,    11.  1.  5|         EU25 for doctors and other medical professionals. Finnish citizens
257   IV,    11.  1.  5|           survey demonstrates that medical errors are perceived by
258   IV,    11.  1.  5|           responsible for avoiding medical errors, the patient is also
259   IV,    11.  1.  5|       likelihood of experiencing a medical error.~ ~Satisfaction with
260   IV,    11.  1.  6|            which can be either via medical procedures, groups of medical
261   IV,    11.  1.  6|      medical procedures, groups of medical procedures, or most commonly
262   IV,    11.  2.  1|     hospital beds are allocated to medical and surgical specialties (
263   IV,    11.  3.  1|           increasing complexity of medical treatments (Simoens and
264   IV,    11.  3.  1|            number of admissions to medical schools (Simoens and Hurst
265   IV,    11.  3.  1|           controlled the intake to medical schools. But the lower numbers
266   IV,    11.  3.  1|     doctors, and included limiting medical school intake. From 1990
267   IV,    11.  3.  1|         2005, the annual number of medical students graduating in France,
268   IV,    11.  3.  1|  educational initiatives where the medical degree is conditional on
269   IV,    11.  3.  1|           Norway and Sweden locate medical schools in rural areas to
270   IV,    11.  3.  1|           offering scholarships to medical students who commit to practice
271   IV,    11.  3.  1|      process. The typical training medical school in Europe is 5-6
272   IV,    11.  3.  1|         and a life-long continuing medical education path.~ ~Regardless
273   IV,    11.  3.  1| WHO-sponsored World Federation for Medical Education. Regulating bodies
274   IV,    11.  3.  2| information on pharmaceuticals and medical technologies~ ~Where possible,
275   IV,    11.  4    |           analysis. It studies the medical, social, ethical and economic
276   IV,    11.  4    |      summarises information on the medical, social, economic and ethical
277   IV,    11.  5.  1|          treatment for other unmet medical needs. Every year, a number
278   IV,    11.  5.  4|            and transplantation are medical treatments that require
279   IV,    11.  5.  4|          damage. While maintaining medical confidentiality, the organ
280   IV,    11.  5.  6|           organs and blood used in medical treatment. EU Directives
281   IV,    11.  5.  6|             5 on the protection of medical dataWorld Health Organisation
282   IV,    11.  5.  6|            transplant surgical and medical teams.~ ~
283   IV,    11.  6.  2|          private health insurance, medical saving accounts (MSAs) (
284   IV,    11.  6.  2|          England where all private medical insurance policies are subject
285   IV,    11.  6.  2|        services or for all covered medical services. These special
286   IV,    11.  6.  2|       unofficial fees or gifts for medical services in 2001, while
287   IV,    11.  6.  4|      countries explicitly regulate medical devices, and all but Germany (
288   IV,    11.  6.  4|            resulting from specific medical and health interventions.
289   IV,    11.  6.  4| Attributing changes in outcomes to medical care requires distinguishing
290   IV,    11.  6.  4|           not purely the result of medical care, but is also influenced
291   IV,    11.  6.  5|             Blendon R Eds. (1979): Medical Technology: the Culprit
292   IV,    11.  6.  5|       health: measuring effects of medical care." Milbank Quarterly
293   IV,    11.  6.  5|        Network Workshop." Canadian Medical Association Journal 153:
294   IV,    11.  6.  5|            financial incentives on medical practice: results from a
295   IV,    11.  6.  5|           and clinical pathways on medical practice: effectiveness
296   IV,    11.  6.  5|     inequity [editorial]." British Medical Journal 315(7102): 202-203.~ ~
297   IV,    11.  6.  5|           assessing the quality of medical care." Medical Care Review
298   IV,    11.  6.  5|          quality of medical care." Medical Care Review 37(7): 653-98.~ ~
299   IV,    11.  6.  5|            preliminary taxonomy of medical errors in family practice."
300   IV,    11.  6.  5|           et al. (2003): "Types of medical errors commonly reported
301   IV,    11.  6.  5|  Commission (2006): "Eurobarometer Medical Errors." Retrieved 26 June,
302   IV,    11.  6.  5|            Journal of the American Medical Association 277(4): 312-
303   IV,    11.  6.  5|       Morbidity and mortality from medical errors: an increasingly
304   IV,    11.  6.  5|    hypothesis an economic heresy?" Medical Care Research and Review
305   IV,    11.  6.  5|           quality in health care?" Medical Care Research and Review
306   IV,    11.  6.  5|           Measuring the quality of medical care”. New England Journal
307   IV,    11.  6.  5|  intravenous drug errors." British Medical Journal 326: 684.~ ~The
308   IV,    11.  6.  5|           inequality in the use of medical care in 21 OECD countries.
309   IV,    11.  6.  5|            2000): "Epidemiology of medical error." British Medical
310   IV,    11.  6.  5|            medical error." British Medical Journal 320: 774-77.~ ~Westerling
311   IV,    11.  6.  5|     Australian health care study." Medical Journal of Australia 163:
312   IV,    12.  1    |            own health services and medical care (Article 152 (4.5).~ ~
313   IV,    12.  1    |            50 (services, including medical and sanitary services)~ ~
314   IV,    12.  1    |    delivery of health services and medical care. In particular, measures
315   IV,    12.  1    |      provisions on the donation or medical use of organs and blood.~ ~
316   IV,    12.  1    |  prevalence of different diseases, medical culture, demography and
317   IV,    12.  1    |       Industry~Pharmaceuticals~and Medical~Devices~ ~ ~Food industry~ ~
318   IV,    12.  3    |          abroad, an easy access to medical treatment when travelling,
319   IV,    12.  4    |         Care~ENTR~Pharmaceuticals; Medical Devices; Biotechnology;
320   IV,    12.  4    |       Group on Health Services and Medical Care established in July
321   IV,    12.  5    | traceability and accessibility for medical use while respecting Member
322   IV,    12.  5    |            supply in hospitals and medical practice)~- Data from Epidemiological
323   IV,    12. 10    |        organisations (e. g. German Medical Association/Bundesärztekammer,
324   IV,    12. 10    |            Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (Bundesinstitut
325   IV,    12. 10    |    products and risk monitoring of medical devices.~The Drug Commission
326   IV,    12. 10    |           Commission of the German Medical Association (Arzneimittelkommission
327   IV,    12. 10    |       safety“ – provided by German Medical Association (Bundesärztekammer,
328   IV,    12. 10    |            well as patients in the medical field.~The protection of
329   IV,    12. 10    |      January 2004, equal access to medical supply is possible~National
330   IV,    12. 10    |    monitoring.~Pharmaceuticals and medical devices produced using genetic
331   IV,    12. 10    |            Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices/Bundesinstituts
332   IV,    12. 10    |         Gene Therapy of the German Medical Association (Kommission
333   IV,    12. 10    |           the oppurtunity to get a medical examination free of charge,
334   IV,    12. 10    |        available free of charge to medical card holders on prescription (
335   IV,    12. 10    |          Pharmacy Act 2007:~htt 20~Medical Practitioners Act 2007: htt 25~
336   IV,    12. 10    |         participated in a detailed medical examination.~ ~Health in
337   IV,    12. 10    |    personnel in handling hazardous medical waste. Also, hospitals are
338   IV,    12. 10    |          Greek State provides free medical and pharmaceutical care
339   IV,    12. 10    |        obesity.~Also, the Hellenic Medical Association for Obesity (www r)
340   IV,    12. 10    |            2006: Setting up of new medical and social places for reducing
341   IV,    12. 10    |        Psychotropic Substances and Medical Products~ State Program
342   IV,    12. 10    | functioning of Romanian Academy of Medical Sciences~The structure of
343   IV,    12. 10    |        evidence based medicine and medical practice, the government
344   IV,    12. 10    |        effect on January 2007. The medical content is based on three-year
345   IV,    12. 10    |             As regards specialized medical care, they have had the
346   IV,    12. 10    |            50 000. For specialized medical care (hospitals other than
347   IV,    12. 10    |       public health and health and medical care that are linked to
348   IV,    12. 10    |           health policy~Health and medical care policy~Education policy~
349   IV,    12. 10    |           health policy~Health and medical care policy~Social service
350   IV,    12. 10    |           health policy~Health and medical care policy~Education policy~
351   IV,    12. 10    |           health policy~Health and medical care policy~Food policy~
352   IV,    12. 10    |             Food policy~Health and medical care policy~Consumer policy~
353   IV,    12. 10    |           health policy~Health and medical care policy~Social service
354   IV,    12. 10    |           health policy~Health and medical care policy~ ~Early abortions~
355   IV,    12. 10    |           objective 8~ ~Health and medical care policy~Sexual violence
356   IV,    12. 10    |        Education policy~Health and medical care policy~Equal opportunity
357   IV,    12. 10    |         reported (dead and needing medical treatment) in different
358   IV,    12. 10    |           health policy~Health and medical care policy~Food policy~
359   IV,    13.  5    |       Group on Health Services and Medical Care established in July
360   IV,    13.  7    |            new medicinal products, medical devices, diagnostic tools
361   IV,    13.  7    |           and constituent parts of medical devices. Their collection
362   IV,    13.  7.  5|            of preventive medicine, medical diagnosis, the provision
363   IV,    13.  7.  5|          notification or access to medical records . More important
364   IV,    13.  7.  5|         that ‘preventive medicine, medical diagnosis, the provision