Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  7    |            this small jewel created on water live in houses with green
  2    I,     2.  7    |           mention the recovery of rain water, the underground waste disposal
  3    I,     2.  7    |            transit and self-sufficient water and energy systems. The
  4    I,     2.  8    |                to control air, soil or water pollutantsimpact on the
  5    I,     2.  9    |          average.~ ~Warming of surface water can have several effects
  6    I,     2.  9    |                have several effects on water quality and hence on human
  7    I,     2.  9    |          health risks, particularly in water bodies used for public water
  8    I,     2.  9    |           water bodies used for public water supply and bathing.~ ~Climate
  9    I,     2.  9    |            more variable. Increases in water demand for agriculture (
 10    I,     2.  9    |             increasing competition for water between sectors and uses.~ ~
 11    I,     2. 10.  1|           crops, e.g. improve nutrient/water use efficiency, resistance
 12    I,     2. 10.  3|    preventative services (e.g. air and water quality on-line information)
 13   II,     5.  2.  6|            physical activity, alcohol, water, environment), strengthening
 14   II,     5. 11.  1|              essential for controlling water and heat loss of the body
 15   II,     5. 11.  4|       temperature regulation, salt and water balance and defense against
 16   II,     6.  3.  4|             maintenance of the various water systems. Guidelines for
 17   II,     6.  3.  4|                systems. Guidelines for water plants sanitation have been
 18   II,     6.  3.  6|                weaknesses in food (and water) processing and handling
 19   II,     6.  3.  6|               food (mainly chicken) or water. Other risk factors include
 20   II,     6.  3.  6|               of contaminated food and water. Preventive measures include
 21   II,     6.  3.  6|               via contaminated food or water. General hygiene measures
 22   II,     6.  3.  6|             raw milk), or contaminated water. Direct contact with infected
 23   II,     6.  3.  6|                of contaminated food or water, and several large waterborne
 24   II,     6.  3.  6|          through contaminated drinking water. Cryptosporidiosis is not
 25   II,     6.  3.  7|                contact or ingestion of water, food, or soil contaminated
 26   II,     6.  3.  7|              recreational contact with water, soil or other material
 27   II,     6.  3.  7|            urine or contaminated fresh water.~ ~The overall incidence
 28   II,     7.  3.  4|    two-wheelers) or by the area (road, water, etc.) where the accident
 29   II,     7.  4.  4|           Swimming and bathing in open water and mountain hiking and
 30   II,     9        |               chlorination in drinking water, releases from waste disposal
 31   II,     9.  1.  2|               chlorination in drinking water, releases from waste disposal
 32   II,     9.  2.  5|           Europe:~· RPG I: ensure safe water and adequate sanitation~·
 33  III,    10.  1    |        multiple sources (food, air and water), the 'cocktail-effect'
 34  III,    10.  1    |         contaminated food and drinking water~Schools~Developmental~Factors~
 35  III,    10.  1    |          exposures~Infectious diseases~water, air and food contamination~
 36  III,    10.  2.  1|               with poor access to safe water or sanitary facilities are
 37  III,    10.  2.  1|         periodontal lesions. Community water fluoridation is effective
 38  III,    10.  2.  1|                 OMullane et al. 2004) Water fluoridation benefits all
 39  III,    10.  2.  1|          residents served by community water supplies regardless of their
 40  III,    10.  2.  1|              influenced by exposure to water fluoridation.~ ~Oral Hygiene
 41  III,    10.  2.  5|       reduction of lean mass and total water content of the body; such
 42  III,    10.  3.  1|             the ground, but radon from water, outdoor air and construction
 43  III,    10.  3.  2|               toxic substances in air, water, soil and within the food-chain,
 44  III,    10.  3.  2|      industrial emissions into air and water, and gives access to information
 45  III,    10.  3.  2|           two-thirds of the 50 air and water industrial pollutants have
 46  III,    10.  3.  2|               pollutants released into water bodies (-14.5%), the various
 47  III,    10.  3.  2|                pollution affecting the water supply of thousands of people
 48  III,    10.  3.  2|   industrialised and urbanised region. Water monitoring results between
 49  III,    10.  3.  2|          industrial and communal waste water treatment plants, recycling,
 50  III,    10.  3.  2|          exposures~Infectious diseases~water, air and food contamination~
 51  III,    10.  3.  2|           sources. Arsenic in drinking water and cadmium from diffused
 52  III,    10.  3.  4|             Increased risk of food and water shortages, malnutrition
 53  III,    10.  3.  4|           abrasions and contusions) to water related and water-borne
 54  III,    10.  3.  4|                to the contamination of water systems with dangerous chemicals
 55  III,    10.  3.  4|       emergency supplies such as clean water, blankets and food and provide
 56  III,    10.  3.  4|      investigated the following areas: water, sanitation and hygiene,
 57  III,    10.  3.  4|             reported, contamination of water supplies and food sources
 58  III,    10.  3.  4|            vulnerable groups. Although water supply was not disrupted,
 59  III,    10.  3.  4|         largely contaminated by sewage water. The local authorities warned
 60  III,    10.  3.  4|             about the risk of possible water contamination and advised
 61  III,    10.  3.  4|               them to use only mineral water, adding an additional burden
 62  III,    10.  3.  4|               as disease surveillance, water analysis and treatment,
 63  III,    10.  3.  4|                productivity and causes water scarcity. It affected 6
 64  III,    10.  3.  4|          health in summer time through water scarcity. Droughts can affect
 65  III,    10.  3.  4|   drinking-water supply and compromise water quality. Drought in Europe
 66  III,    10.  3.  4|       regulations are not updated. Low water levels in rivers can increase
 67  III,    10.  3.  4|               loads of contaminants in water supplies. The incidence
 68  III,    10.  4.  2|        including commodities with high water and high acid content; and~•
 69  III,    10.  4.  2|             contaminated foodstuffs or water). Salmonella in poultry,
 70  III,    10.  4.  2|              and contaminated drinking water~Salmonellosis~35.0 per 100
 71  III,    10.  4.  2|       vegetables~Contaminated drinking water~Trichinellosis and Echinococcosis~
 72  III,    10.  4.  2|               by contaminated drinking water. Caliciviruses are the most
 73  III,    10.  4.  2|            common sources are drinking water, fruit and vegetables. Further
 74  III,    10.  4.  2|          natural contaminant of ground water in specific areas of several
 75  III,    10.  4.  2|         contaminants~ ~Lead~ ~Drinking water, via lead~Water pipes~ ~
 76  III,    10.  4.  2|               Drinking water, via lead~Water pipes~ ~Inhibits haemoglobin~
 77  III,    10.  4.  2|          standard~for lead in drinking water~to be reduced, means that~
 78  III,    10.  4.  2|           reduced, means that~all lead water pipes must~be replaced;
 79  III,    10.  4.  2|            have been found in drinking water in the Rhine-Ruhr area,
 80  III,    10.  4.  2|        residues in food or in drinking water. Protecting the health of
 81  III,    10.  4.  2|              vegetables, but also from water and other foods. Nitrate
 82  III,    10.  4.  2|  especiallyendives,~spinach, lettuce),~water; increased in both~through
 83  III,    10.  4.  2|             lettuce, spinach,~drinking water~ ~Exposure via drinking
 84  III,    10.  4.  2|                  Exposure via drinking water,~below standard; sporadic~
 85  III,    10.  4.  2|               and residues in drinking water derived from groundwater;~·
 86  III,    10.  4.  2|              above parametric drinking water standards (legal levels
 87  III,    10.  4.  2|       pesticides with regard to ground water, surface water, degradation
 88  III,    10.  4.  2|               to ground water, surface water, degradation kinetics, air,
 89  III,    10.  4.  2|       contamination; the FOCUS surface water scenarios; the FOCUS estimation
 90  III,    10.  4.  3|                 Ingestion and drinking water contamination and sanitation~ ~
 91  III,    10.  4.  3|              Commission for Europe~WFD~Water Framework Directive~WHO~
 92  III,    10.  4.  3|               Health Organisation~WISE~Water Information System for Europe~
 93  III,    10.  4.  3|      Information System for Europe~WSP~Water Safety Plans~ ~ ~ ~
 94  III,    10.  4.  3|                access to safe drinking water. An effective quality control
 95  III,    10.  4.  3|          effective quality control and water treatment mechanism is in
 96  III,    10.  4.  3|              from the contamination of water by pathogenic viruses, bacteria
 97  III,    10.  4.  3|           bacteria or protozoa. Ground water contains, depending on the
 98  III,    10.  4.  3|                 human activities cause water contamination with heavy
 99  III,    10.  4.  3|         transmitted to people when the water is used for drinking, food
100  III,    10.  4.  3|        purposes.~ ~The availability of water of good quality for consumption
101  III,    10.  4.  3|         availability and situations of water shortage are already occurring
102  III,    10.  4.  3|               availability of drinking water from natural sources is
103  III,    10.  4.  3|          change is predicted to change water availability in many European
104  III,    10.  4.  3|               be dryer, others wetter. Water scarcity in dry regions
105  III,    10.  4.  3|              to be developed. Drinking water supplies risk to be disrupted
106  III,    10.  4.  3|                Guidelines for drinking water (WHO, 2006a). Another important
107  III,    10.  4.  3|                important source is the Water Information System for Europe (
108  III,    10.  4.  3|              which covers the European Water Framework Directive (European
109  III,    10.  4.  3|                and analysis~ ~Drinking water~ ~Health impact of poor
110  III,    10.  4.  3|               of poor quality drinking water~ ~Significant mortality
111  III,    10.  4.  3|            main health effects of poor water quality. There is no consolidated
112  III,    10.  4.  3|       countries with advanced drinking water and sanitation systems,
113  III,    10.  4.  3|          breakdowns or failures in the water supply systems due to missing
114  III,    10.  4.  3|               the contamination of raw water supplies. In the European
115  III,    10.  4.  3|             delivery systems including water treatment and quality control.
116  III,    10.  4.  3|              some rural areas drinking water is abstracted from ground
117  III,    10.  4.  3|              is abstracted from ground water and usually consumed without
118  III,    10.  4.  3|               not have access to clean water. A recent estimate of mortality
119  III,    10.  4.  3|           disease attributable to poor water, sanitation and hygiene
120  III,    10.  4.  3|               die annually due to poor water conditions (Valent et al,
121  III,    10.  4.  3|          natural contaminant of ground water. Chronic arsenic poisoning
122  III,    10.  4.  3|             children. The WHO Drinking water guidelines (WHO, 2006) recommend
123  III,    10.  4.  3|                μg/l for As in drinking water . The estimated cancer risk
124  III,    10.  4.  3|              higher than for any other water contaminant listed by WHO
125  III,    10.  4.  3|                concentration in ground water are exceeding 10 μg/l and
126  III,    10.  4.  3|             delivery systems including water treatment and quality control.
127  III,    10.  4.  3|               In rural areas, drinking water is abstracted from ground
128  III,    10.  4.  3|              is abstracted from ground water and usually consumed without
129  III,    10.  4.  3|      population permanently depends on water abstracted from private
130  III,    10.  4.  3|                access to safe drinking water remains lower, albeit rising
131  III,    10.  4.  3|         population connected to public water supply in the European Union,
132  III,    10.  4.  3|          available year~ ~The cause of water related disease outbreaks
133  III,    10.  4.  3|            breakdown or failure in the water supply system - such as
134  III,    10.  4.  3|             untreated waste and sewage water resulting in contamination
135  III,    10.  4.  3|                in contamination of raw water supplies. A third source
136  III,    10.  4.  3|               A third source is ground water contaminated either by naturally
137  III,    10.  4.  3|       countries with advanced drinking water and sanitation systems (
138  III,    10.  4.  3|                2).~ ~A special case of water safety is the occurrence
139  III,    10.  4.  3|              can be found in all fresh water environments and particularly
140  III,    10.  4.  3|     elimination of Legionella from all water systems is impossible, public
141  III,    10.  4.  3|          enable Legionella to colonise water systems. Moreover, the presence
142  III,    10.  4.  3|            presence of Legionella in a water system does not always result
143  III,    10.  4.  3|                EWGLI) at http ~ ~Waste water treatment~ ~The European
144  III,    10.  4.  3|              500 million people. Waste water generated by these people,
145  III,    10.  4.  3|              of European waters. Waste water discharges may have wide-ranging
146  III,    10.  4.  3|               the longest tradition of water purification, more than
147  III,    10.  4.  3|               the environment of waste water and sewage sludge. Increased
148  III,    10.  4.  3|           eco-toxicological effects on water living species. The human
149  III,    10.  4.  3|            ambitions to re-cycle waste water for drinking water there
150  III,    10.  4.  3|               waste water for drinking water there is a potential for
151  III,    10.  4.  3|               especially in areas with water scarcity. The increasing
152  III,    10.  4.  3|               and Use of Transboundary Water sources and International
153  III,    10.  4.  3|             and to effectively protect water used as a source of drinking-water.
154  III,    10.  4.  3|                ensuring access to safe water in an integrated manner.
155  III,    10.  4.  3|             the most recent one is the Water Framework Directive (WFD) (
156  III,    10.  4.  3|            Convention, the Protocol on Water and Health (UNECE, 1999)
157  III,    10.  4.  3|            well being through a better water management, including the
158  III,    10.  4.  3|            including the protection of water ecosystems, and by preventing,
159  III,    10.  4.  3|                supply of safe drinking water and adequate sanitation
160  III,    10.  4.  3|                and effectively protect water used as a source of drinking
161  III,    10.  4.  3|                as a source of drinking water. Priority diseases selected
162  III,    10.  4.  3|           adopted in December 2000 the Water Framework Directive (WFD) (
163  III,    10.  4.  3|           which has a holistic view on water management in the European
164  III,    10.  4.  3|              and sustainable access to water of high hygienic quality
165  III,    10.  4.  3|                take a full grip of the water cycle. The Directive sets
166  III,    10.  4.  3|             planning and management of water resources at river basin
167  III,    10.  4.  3|                i.e. to achieve a "good water status" for all waters by
168  III,    10.  4.  3|         wetlands); promote sustainable water use; ensure the reduction
169  III,    10.  4.  3|             long-term policy basis for water management at European level.
170  III,    10.  4.  3|          management at European level. Water flows do not respect national
171  III,    10.  4.  3|             organize the management of water within river basin districts (
172  III,    10.  4.  3|               the classical integrated water management approach, where
173  III,    10.  4.  3|               consideration of surface water and groundwater as welll
174  III,    10.  4.  3|             groundwater as welll as of water quantity and quality aspects.
175  III,    10.  4.  3|            other waters, including all water resources (fresh surface
176  III,    10.  4.  3|               resources (fresh surface water and groundwater) and all
177  III,    10.  4.  3|               and groundwater) and all water uses, functions and values.~ ~
178  III,    10.  4.  3|              and values.~ ~Focusing on water contaminating chemicals,
179  III,    10.  4.  3|                required to support the Water Framework Directive, will
180  III,    10.  4.  3|           advocates the development of Water Safety Plans (WSP). The
181  III,    10.  4.  3|               health and ensuring good water supply practice are the
182  III,    10.  4.  3|       objectives are applicable to all water supply chains, irrespective
183  III,    10.  4.  3|                size or complexity. The water supplier is the key player
184  III,    10.  4.  3|       effective way of ensuring that a water supply is safe for human
185  III,    10.  4.  3|           towards all steps within the water supply chain from catchments
186  III,    10.  4.  3|              of the drivers behind the Water Framework Directive. The
187  III,    10.  4.  3|           1998a) sets out criteria for water suitable for human consumption.
188  III,    10.  4.  3|          exceeded in order to maintain water quality and ensure human
189  III,    10.  4.  3|       by-products produced through the water purification process, and
190  III,    10.  4.  3|              be introduced through the water distribution system. Arsenic,
191  III,    10.  4.  3|                contaminant of drinking water, is not included. However,
192  III,    10.  4.  3|                Guidelines for drinking water, i.e. 10 μg/l (10 ppb).~ ~
193  III,    10.  4.  3|                10 ppb).~ ~The Drinking water directive stipulates that
194  III,    10.  4.  3|             health impacts. Reports on water quality must be made publicly
195  III,    10.  4.  3|              Directive applies only to water supplies providing more
196  III,    10.  4.  3|               people. Thus, very small water supplies (for example private
197  III,    10.  4.  3|        chemical contamination of small water supplies is a serious problem
198  III,    10.  4.  3|              systems in place.~ ~Waste water and waste water treatment
199  III,    10.  4.  3|                  Waste water and waste water treatment is regulated by
200  III,    10.  4.  3|               target is to protect the water environment from the adverse
201  III,    10.  4.  3|              discharges of urban waste water and from certain industrial
202  III,    10.  4.  3|            discharges from urban waste water treatment plants to sensitive
203  III,    10.  4.  3|            addressing the Challenge of Water Scarcity and Drought in
204  III,    10.  4.  3|         developments~ ~A safe drinking water supply and safe bathing
205  III,    10.  4.  3|                supply and safe bathing water is vital for the health
206  III,    10.  4.  3|         society have direct impacts on water supply and on quality. Water
207  III,    10.  4.  3|           water supply and on quality. Water flows are not limited by
208  III,    10.  4.  3|                by national borders and water is a common commodity for
209  III,    10.  4.  3|            place to manage and protect water sources. The Protocol on
210  III,    10.  4.  3|               sources. The Protocol on Water and Health under the UNECE
211  III,    10.  4.  3|            Convention and the European Water Framework Directive will
212  III,    10.  4.  3|             drinking- and recreational water. Many countries depend on
213  III,    10.  4.  3|                the demand for drinking water, and are quickly depleting
214  III,    10.  4.  3|              around cities. Today, the water supply of some 140 million
215  III,    10.  4.  3|            excessive amounts of ground water for irrigation. These processes
216  III,    10.  4.  3|                management of the whole water cycle and particularly to
217  III,    10.  4.  3|               in relation to supply.~ ~Water scarcity is already a problem
218  III,    10.  4.  3|                future. The pressure on water availability will increase
219  III,    10.  4.  3|        approaches to re-using of waste water and increased desalination
220  III,    10.  4.  3|          increased desalination of sea water will be reinforced. The
221  III,    10.  4.  3|               the delivery of drinking water is highly vulnerable to
222  III,    10.  4.  3|              design and maintenance of water delivery systems, both on
223  III,    10.  4.  3|               and on the waste side.~ ~Water sources in many areas are
224  III,    10.  4.  3|      agriculture or insufficient waste water treatment. New potential
225  III,    10.  4.  3|       potential pollutants of drinking water are appearing, e.g. nano-materials
226  III,    10.  4.  3|            natural waters and drinking water sources. Current sewage
227  III,    10.  4.  3|               Current sewage and waste water treatment processes are
228  III,    10.  4.  3|          levels of arsenic in drinking water may currently be underestimated
229  III,    10.  4.  3|      concerning the quality of bathing water. Available at: htt ML~European
230  III,    10.  4.  3|               91/271/EC on Urban Waste Water. Available at: htt ML~European
231  III,    10.  4.  3|       Commission (1998a): The Drinking Water Directive (DWD), Council
232  III,    10.  4.  3|            Commission (2000): European Water Framework Directive 2000/
233  III,    10.  4.  3|            Commission (2006b): Bathing water Directive, Directive 2006/
234  III,    10.  4.  3|              the Council: Challenge of water Scarcity and Drought in
235  III,    10.  4.  3|           Agency (EEA) (2008): Bathing water assessment (draft). EEA -
236  III,    10.  4.  3|               IMS Indicators - Bathing water quality (CSI 022) - Assessment
237  III,    10.  4.  3|              epidemiology and drinking water standards. Science 296:
238  III,    10.  4.  3|               and Use of Transboundary Water sources and International
239  III,    10.  4.  3|             UNECE) (1999): Protocol on Water and Health to the 1992 Convention
240  III,    10.  4.  3|          Disease Series, No 8. Geneva.~Water Information System for Europe (
241  III,    10.  4.  3|           Europe (WISE): Environment - Water - Water Framework Directive -
242  III,    10.  4.  3|                  Environment - Water - Water Framework Directive - Wise
243  III,    10.  4.  3|       Available at: htt n/~WHO (2005): Water Safety Plans. Managing drinking-water
244  III,    10.  4.  3|             Available at: htt ml~WHO – Water; WHO | Drinking water. Available
245  III,    10.  4.  3|                  Water; WHO | Drinking water. Available at: htt ~ ~
246  III,    10.  4.  5|             Multiple exposure: bathing water and soil contamination/waste
247  III,    10.  4.  5|                      10.4.5.1. Bathing water~ ~ ~Acronyms~ ~WISE Water
248  III,    10.  4.  5|              water~ ~ ~Acronyms~ ~WISE Water Information System for Europe~ ~
249  III,    10.  4.  5|           changes, not only reduce the water’s attractiveness, but may
250  III,    10.  4.  5|            e.g. by dermal contact with water, ingestion of small amounts
251  III,    10.  4.  5|          ingestion of small amounts of water or inhalation of aereosols.~ ~
252  III,    10.  4.  5|             WHO Guidelines for bathing water (WHO, 2003). Another important
253  III,    10.  4.  5|                important source is the Water Information System for Europe (
254  III,    10.  4.  5|              which covers the European Water Framework Directive (European
255  III,    10.  4.  5|                to investments in waste water treatment facilities, bathing
256  III,    10.  4.  5|          treatment facilities, bathing water quality has improved since
257  III,    10.  4.  5|           Figure 10.4.5.1.1.a. Bathing water. Compliance with the old
258  III,    10.  4.  5|             the old and new EU bathing water directives in coastal water~ ~
259  III,    10.  4.  5|            water directives in coastal water~ ~Figure 10.4.5.1.1.b. Bathing
260  III,    10.  4.  5|           Figure 10.4.5.1.1.b. Bathing water. Compliance with the old
261  III,    10.  4.  5|             the old and new EU bathing water directives in inland water.~ ~
262  III,    10.  4.  5|             water directives in inland water.~ ~Some of the parameters
263  III,    10.  4.  5|                health. The new Bathing Water Directive (2006/7/EC) introduces
264  III,    10.  4.  5|            illness. In the new Bathing Water Directive two mandatory
265  III,    10.  4.  5|                health. The new Bathing Water Directive will repeal the
266  III,    10.  4.  5|          transparency, discolouring of water, scum formation and unpleasant
267  III,    10.  4.  5|                moving both on land and water) snails and causes dermatitis
268  III,    10.  4.  5|               recreational purposes of water bodies disseminated along
269  III,    10.  4.  5|            policies~ ~A new EU Bathing water Directive (European Commission,
270  III,    10.  4.  5|                health. The new Bathing Water Directive will repeal the
271  III,    10.  4.  5|                to qualify as a bathing water. Standards have been raised
272  III,    10.  4.  5|            sufficient'. Information on water quality will be provided
273  III,    10.  4.  5|               be reduced. This bathing water management programme will
274  III,    10.  4.  5|             regions and covered by the Water Framework Directive. However,
275  III,    10.  4.  5|            Commission (2000): European Water Framework Directive 2000/
276  III,    10.  4.  5|            Commission (2006b): Bathing water Directive, Directive 2006/
277  III,    10.  4.  5|              the Council: Challenge of water Scarcity and Drought in
278  III,    10.  4.  5|           Agency (EEA) (2008): Bathing water assessment (draft). EEA -
279  III,    10.  4.  5|               IMS Indicators - Bathing water quality (CSI 022) - Assessment
280  III,    10.  4.  5|        Guideline for safe recreational water environments. Volume 1:
281  III,    10.  4.  5|               example through drinking water from sources that flow through
282  III,    10.  4.  5|              policies (for instance on water, waste, chemicals, industrial
283  III,    10.  4.  5|        exposure of humans via drinking water from ground sources are
284  III,    10.  4.  5|               of contaminated food and water, or contact with contaminated
285  III,    10.  4.  5|              of soil resources. Unlike water and air, the protection
286  III,    10.  4.  5|               for example, measures on water, waste, chemicals, industrial
287  III,    10.  4.  5|      Prevention and Control Directive, Water Framework Directive, Environmental
288  III,    10.  5.  1|          health (e.g. better access to water supply and sanitation systems;
289  III,    10.  5.  1|             large air conditioning and water cooling plants not complying
290  III,    10.  5.  1|              inhalation of droplets of water contaminated with Legionella
291  III,    10.  5.  1|        equipment~ ~The supply of clean water and the provision of hygiene
292  III,    10.  5.  1|               of contaminated drinking water and water-related disease
293  III,    10.  5.  1|      connection of dwellings to public water supply is above 90% for
294  III,    10.  5.  1|          figure and may provide public water only for 80% or less of
295  III,    10.  5.  1|                mind that connection to water supply is mostly a problem
296  III,    10.  5.  1|              million Europeans receive water from small or very small
297  III,    10.  5.  1|          information on the quality of water from these sources, as supplies
298  III,    10.  5.  1|   Drinking-water Directive, unless the water is supplied as part of a
299  III,    10.  5.  1| Microbiological contamination of small water supplies is a problem and
300  III,    10.  5.  1|                the use of private well water, are reported. The new system
301  III,    10.  5.  1|              of the population obtains water from a private water supply,
302  III,    10.  5.  1|           obtains water from a private water supply, and despite being
303  III,    10.  5.  1|         regulatory standards as public water supplies, outbreaks of disease
304  III,    10.  5.  1|                associated with private water supplies in England and
305  III,    10.  5.  1|           assessing the quality of the water. An example of the potential
306  III,    10.  5.  1|      Czech Republic, where analyses of water samples from 1700 public
307  III,    10.  5.  1|             Health Services found that water in 70% of the wells was
308  III,    10.  5.  1|             less common than access to water (WHO / UNICEF Joint Monitoring
309  III,    10.  5.  1|           reduce the uptake of surface water and rain, which needs to
310  III,    10.  5.  1|               channelled through waste water channels. Various cities
311  III,    10.  5.  1|                lead to flooding as the water flow cannot be managed anymore (
312  III,    10.  5.  1|               noise, air, waste, food, water, regulations and many other
313  III,    10.  5.  1|                Change and the European Water Dimension – A report to
314  III,    10.  5.  1|               A report to the European Water Directors. European Commission -
315  III,    10.  5.  1|        November 1998 on the quality of water intended for human consumption.
316  III,    10.  5.  1|          European Knowledge Network on Water WEKNOW, 2005 (http://www.
317  III,    10.  5.  1|              uploads/booklets/05_small_water_systems_ver_june2005.pdf,
318  III,    10.  5.  1|               Meeting the MDG drinking water and sanitation target: the
319  III,    10.  5.  2|        problems such as air pollution, water quality, noise exposure
320  III,    10.  5.  3|                in electricity, gas and water supply as well as in the
321  III,    10.  6.  2|            conditions, access to food, water, housing and health care
322   IV,    11.  1.  3|           education leading to cleaner water and a better understanding
323   IV,    12.  4    |               health e.g. air quality, water quality, noise; 'European
324   IV,    12.  4    |                pollution, deteriorated water quality, food, genetically-modified
325   IV,    12. 10    |              Drinking and recreational water~Intermediate for Flanders~ ~
326   IV,    12. 10    |              Drinking and recreational water~ High~ ~Soil contamination
327   IV,    12. 10    |              Drinking and recreational water~High priority~ European
328   IV,    12. 10    |        concerning drinking and bathing water have been transposed in
329   IV,    12. 10    |               ensuring a high level of water quality in the respective
330   IV,    12. 10    |             respective areas. Drinking water is considered one of the
331   IV,    12. 10    |              While the safeguarding of water quality is under the responsibility
332   IV,    12. 10    |              the responsibility of the water suppliers, monitoring and
333   IV,    12. 10    |          Federal Ordinance on Drinking Water). The process of implementation
334   IV,    12. 10    |                of the European Bathing water directive and the Water
335   IV,    12. 10    |                water directive and the Water Framework Directive is ongoing.~ ~
336   IV,    12. 10    |              Drinking and recreational water~High~ ~ ~ ~ ~Intermediate~-
337   IV,    12. 10    |      Intermediate~- Quality of Bathing Water Regulations 1992 (as amended),~-
338   IV,    12. 10    |                 as amended),~- Bathing Water Quality Regulations 2008~ ~ ~-
339   IV,    12. 10    |      consultation on making of Bathing Water Quality Regulations 2008
340   IV,    12. 10    |              infectious diseases, food/water/air safety, screening and
341   IV,    12. 10    |             emissions to air, land and water from the industrial activities
342   IV,    12. 10    |              Drinking and recreational water~ High~A progressive system
343   IV,    12. 10    |          progressive system of pricing water consumption is applied in
344   IV,    12. 10    |               order to avoid public of water over-consumption~Many campaigns (
345   IV,    12. 10    |                 events etc) for saving water~Soil contamination and waste
346   IV,    12. 10    |              bottles, plastic bottles (water, refreshments, detergents,
347   IV,    12. 10    |              Drinking and recreational water~ high~Articles about drinking
348   IV,    12. 10    |                Articles about drinking water in 2004 public health law~
349   IV,    12. 10    |                law~Law 2006.1772 about water and aquatic environment:~htt ~
350   IV,    12. 10    |              Drinking and recreational water~ high~Wate ~ ~Different
351   IV,    12. 10    |              Drinking and recreational water~ National Environmental
352   IV,    12. 10    |              Drinking and recreational water~ High~National and local
353   IV,    12. 10    |             and local level~ ~Drinking waterDecree-Law 306/2007 of
354   IV,    12. 10    |                27 August;~Recreational waterDirective 2006/7/EC of
355   IV,    12. 10    |              the management of bathing water quality and repealing Directive
356   IV,    12. 10    |        surveillance system of drinking water.~ ~Soil contamination and
357   IV,    12. 10    |              Drinking and recreational water~ High~Law 458/2002 regarding
358   IV,    12. 10    |                2002 regarding drinking water modified and completed by
359   IV,    12. 10    |            2004 (according to Drinking Water Directive 98/83)~GD 459/
360   IV,    12. 10    |                transmitted in drinking water in Sweden~ ~Levels of persistent
361   IV,    12. 10    |              Drinking and recreational water~High~ ~ ~Soil contamination
362   IV,    13.  2.  2|                lack of access to clean water and inappropriate housing
363  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|                       waste~wastewater~water~water-borne~weather~well-being~