Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  1    |               health needs; the European (Economic) Community and, then, the
  2    I,     2.  1    |                 may largely contribute to economic outcomes in high-income
  3    I,     2.  1    |                   evidence to support the economic importance of health in
  4    I,     2.  1    |                  a large share of today’s economic wealth is directly attributable
  5    I,     2.  2    |    intercontinental markets is a dominant economic topic in recent economic
  6    I,     2.  2    |                  economic topic in recent economic history (globalisation).
  7    I,     2.  4    |             Commission, 2008), social and economic policies can and should
  8    I,     2.  4    |                   benefits of an improved economic framework reach those at
  9    I,     2.  4    |                  both social adequacy and economic sustainability in a framework
 10    I,     2.  4    |            comparisons of the dynamics of economic development both over time
 11    I,     2.  4    |                 by the fact that a steady economic growth has been experienced
 12    I,     2.  4    |           interlinked) factors: a rise in economic insecurity and poverty;
 13    I,     2.  4    |                   important political and economic change is not inevitable.~ ~
 14    I,     2.  5    |             response to globalisation and economic pressures, companies have
 15    I,     2.  5    |                  dominant topic in recent economic history. Liberalisation
 16    I,     2.  5    |               increase due to the current economic situation. Recent estimates
 17    I,     2.  5    |                    The current process of economic and technological transformation
 18    I,     2.  5    |        skill-biased nature of the current economic and technological transformation,
 19    I,     2.  5    |                   adequacy and financial, economic and social sustainability.
 20    I,     2.  6    |                 participate in social and economic life. It should be noted
 21    I,     2.  7    |                emissions. But the growing economic, social and cultural significance
 22    I,     2.  7    |            meeting points for creativity, economic growth and social conflict.
 23    I,     2.  8    |                both population growth and economic growth, energy consumption
 24    I,     2.  9    |                leading to adverse social, economic and environmental effects.~ ~
 25    I,     2. 10.  4|                  of associated health and economic benefits: reducing medication
 26    I,     2. 10.  4|         realisation of all Healthcare and economic benefits related to automatic
 27    I,     2. 11    |                   Directorate-general for economic and financial affairs. Special
 28    I,     3.  4    |              Migrants in Europe and their Economic Position:~Evidence from
 29   II,     4.  1    |                  for ensuring sustainable economic growth, full employment
 30   II,     4.  1    |                  USA) and Japan, our main economic partners. If HLY does not
 31   II,     4.  1    |                 health is fundamental for economic productivity and prosperity.
 32   II,     5.  1.  3|             family, professional, social, economic, etc. -, have to be taken
 33   II,     5.  2.  1|                and consequent increase in economic costs. Therefore, across
 34   II,     5.  2.  3|                 The political, social and economic transition in the former
 35   II,     5.  2.  3|              rising levels of poverty and economic hardship. The east-West
 36   II,     5.  3.  7|           negotiations.~· Ensure that any economic evaluation or Health Technology
 37   II,     5.  4.  1|                 the major contributors to economic and human burden, equally
 38   II,     5.  4.  1|                  middle-income countries, economic development leads to very
 39   II,     5.  4.  1|                   are influenced by socio economic, geographic and ethnic differences. (
 40   II,     5.  4.  2|             linkage.~The human as well as economic burden of diabetes necessitates
 41   II,     5.  4.  3|          Comparable data on the human and economic burden of diabetes and its
 42   II,     5.  4.  6|              diabetes epidemiological and economic data as well as data on
 43   II,     5.  4.  8|           diabetes: literature review and economic modelling Health Technol
 44   II,     5.  5.Acr|         Organisation for Co-operation and Economic Development~WHO HFA~World
 45   II,     5.  5.Int|                  though in most countries economic inactivity remains the rule.
 46   II,     5.  5.Int|                  in people of lower socio economic status requires particular
 47   II,     5.  5.  1|                Luoma et al., 2002).~ ~The economic burden of suicides has a
 48   II,     5.  5.  1|                  One study estimated that economic costs from suicide in Ireland
 49   II,     5.  5.  1|               OECD~ ~The Organisation for Economic Co-Operation Development 50   II,     5.  5.  1|              severity of the disorder and economic and mental burden. The report
 51   II,     5.  5.  1|                    Kennelly B (2007). The economic cost of suicide in Ireland.
 52   II,     5.  5.  1|                        et al. (2007). The economic burden of depression in
 53   II,     5.  5.  3|                   re-hospitalisation. The economic burden caused by schizophrenia
 54   II,     5.  5.  3|                 with it massive human and economic disability costs. Substantially
 55   II,     5.  5.  3|      schizophrenia as a single diagnosis. Economic costs vary by country; this
 56   II,     5.  5.  3|                 expenditures; most of the economic burden is due to DALYs and
 57   II,     5.  5.  3|                adaptation to national and economic backgrounds (Gaebel et al,
 58   II,     5.  5.  3|                 in Europe, the social and economic burden of ASD has not been
 59   II,     5.  5.  3|              Financial Burden of ASD. The economic consequences of Autism in
 60   II,     5.  5.  3|                 indication of the overall economic cost of autism in the UK.~
 61   II,     5.  5.  3|                  R, Beecham J (2007): The economic consequences of autism in
 62   II,     5.  5.  3|            considerable social impact and economic consequences despite its
 63   II,     5.  5.  3|                   based on a model, using economic indexes adjusting for price
 64   II,     5.  5.  3|                  general population). The economic burden of MS for the year
 65   II,     5.  5.  3|                   people have significant economic and social responsibilities.
 66   II,     5.  5.  3|                   for the self-esteem and economic security of the individual.
 67   II,     5.  5.  3|                 MS and the creation of an economic environment in which the
 68   II,     5.  5.  3|                are several gaps in health economic and epidemiological research
 69   II,     5.  5.  3|               includes projects on health economic evaluation of brain disorders
 70   II,     5.  5.  3|                  E, Oertel WH (1998): The economic impact of Parkinson’s disease.
 71   II,     5.  5.  3|        health-related quality of life and economic impact of Parkinson’s disease.
 72   II,     5.  5.  3|                 Playfer JR (2003): Direct economic impact of Parkinson’s disease:
 73   II,     5.  6.  3|                  health care utilization; economic impact and future trends.
 74   II,     5.  6.  3|           Jacobson and Lindgren, 1996).~ ~Economic impact~ ~Musculoskeletal
 75   II,     5.  6.  3|                and risk factors 2006) .~ ~Economic impact is a consequence
 76   II,     5.  6.  3|                   also affect survival.~ ~Economic impact~ ~The direct and
 77   II,     5.  6.  3|             health and work combined with economic aspects have an impact on
 78   II,     5.  6.  3|                  due to its frequency and economic consequences of work loss
 79   II,     5.  6.  4|       implications and represents a great economic burden for policy makers
 80   II,     5.  6.  4|           considered when considering the economic impact of musculoskeletal
 81   II,     5.  6.  6|                  281-282~Woolf AD (2008): Economic Burden of Rheumatic Diseases.
 82   II,     5.  7.  1|                 to other diseases and its economic implications are still largely
 83   II,     5.  7.  1|                 as well as development.~ ~Economic Impact of CKD~ ~Apart from
 84   II,     5.  7.  3|                 posing a still increasing economic burden on Member States.~ ~
 85   II,     5.  7.  3|                 posing a still increasing economic burden on Member States.~ ~
 86   II,     5.  7.  4|                  differences in stages of economic development across EU Member
 87   II,     5.  8.  3|             co-morbidity problems and the economic burden associated to these
 88   II,     5.  8.  3|                  and its comorbidities.~ ~Economic burden and health care utilization~ ~
 89   II,     5.  8.  3|            Several studies focused on the economic aspect of COPD. The ERS
 90   II,     5.  8.  6|                 the increasing health and economic burden of COPD.~ ~Some new
 91   II,     5.  9.  1|               2003).~ ~In addition to the economic burden of asthma, which
 92   II,     5.  9.  2|                    OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development)
 93   II,     5. 11.  4|                  and hypertension.~ ~High economic costs~Although skin disease
 94   II,     5. 11.  4|                 studies have assessed the economic impact of specific skin
 95   II,     5. 11.  4|                   within the framework of economic evaluations.~ ~
 96   II,     5. 11.  6|            affected people and that their economic consequences can also be
 97   II,     5. 11.  7|             Hunter JAA, et al (1994): The economic burden of atopic eczema:
 98   II,     5. 13    |                   less energy. Social and economic pressures can mean that
 99   II,     5. 13    |                and obesity also impose an economic burden on society through
100   II,     5. 14.  3|                   in ethnic minorities.~ ~Economic impact~ ~Because of the
101   II,     5. 14.  3|                   impact~ ~Because of the economic and political changes in
102   II,     5. 14.  3|                   health expenses, has an economic significance, thus the industrialized
103   II,     5. 15.  3|                 the OD regulation and the economic burden of these new therapies (
104   II,     5. 15.  6|                   J (2007): Assessing the economic challenges posed by orphan
105   II,     6.  3.  4|             caused significant social and economic disruption in areas with
106   II,     6.  3.  6|            profound political, social and economic implications. Because of
107   II,     6.  4.  3|                 services paralysed, heavy economic losses, ethical dilemmas
108   II,     7.Acr    |              Board)~OECD~Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development~
109   II,     7.  2.  5|                non OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development)
110   II,     7.  3.  1|               people to date, an enormous economic and public health toll;~·
111   II,     7.  3.  4|                 11. Fatalities at work by economic activity, EU15~ ~More information
112   II,     7.  4.  6|         pesticides), social isolation and economic hardship.~ ~Some risk factors
113   II,     7.  4.  7|                 undermines the social and economic conditions in society (European
114   II,     7.  4.  7|               larger cultural, social and economic factors that contribute
115   II,     8.  1.  5|                   various barriers in the economic and social environment that
116   II,     8.  2.  1|                   individualssocial and economic environments. Experts endorse
117   II,     8.  2.  2|                  constitute a significant economic burden for the individual,
118   II,     8.  2.  2|          disincentives to compliance.~The economic effects of visual impairment
119   II,     8.  2.  3|                  in language acquisition, economic and educational disadvantage,
120   II,     9        |                   less energy. Social and economic pressures can mean that
121   II,     9.  1.  2|                  There has been no recent economic evaluation of the “burden”
122   II,     9.  2.  2|                          Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (
123   II,     9.  2.  3|                 emotional abuse, neglect, economic exploitation and bullying.
124   II,     9.  2.  3|                health in adulthood, their economic and caring capacity - including
125   II,     9.  2.  5|                  addresses the social and economic factors that influence health
126   II,     9.  2.  6|                  to the psycho-social and economic determinants of health.
127   II,     9.  3.  1|                  though in most countries economic inactivity remains the norm.
128   II,     9.  3.  1|              societies, it is the unequal economic, social and cultural status
129   II,     9.  3.  1|                   access to prevention or economic security, or who are involved
130   II,     9.  3.  1|             population creates social and economic dysfunctions and requires
131   II,     9.  3.  1|                   less energy. Social and economic pressures can mean that
132   II,     9.  3.  1|                adverse health, social and economic consequences of depression’.
133   II,     9.  3.  3|              several social, cultural and economic factors. One potential explanation
134   II,     9.  3.  3|               Module~UNECE~United Nations Economic Commission for Europe~UNFPA~
135   II,     9.  4.  1|                   of the greatest social, economic and health challenges in
136   II,     9.  4.  1|                   who have contributed to economic growth and the public health
137   II,     9.  4.  1|            delivery must be combined with economic, environmental and general
138   II,     9.  4.  6|        residential care homes.~ ~This has economic as well as quality of life
139   II,     9.  5.  1|                 educational, cultural and economic status. In addition, women
140   II,     9.  5.  1|            societies typically ignore the economic and political significance
141   II,     9.  5.  1|           vulnerable population groups.~ ~Economic inequalities mean that in
142   II,     9.  5.  3|             selected EUGLOREH countries~ ~Economic inequalities mean that in
143   II,     9.  5.  3|                   less energy. Social and economic pressures can mean that
144   II,     9.  5.  3|                 addition, women’s reduced economic and empowerment opportunities
145   II,     9.  5.  3|                  changing demographic and economic profile, individuals with
146   II,     9.  5.  4|                women in Turkey in social, economic and political life.~ Reference
147   II,     9.  5.  4|                   for all development and economic growth.~ ~Gender Equality
148   II,     9.  5.  5|         integrated into all “social” and “economicdevelopment for the improvement
149   II,     9.  5.  5|                   populations. Social and economic inclusion of all European
150   II,     9.  5.  5|         healthcare resources and national economic competitiveness as well
151   II,     9.  5.  6|                adverse health, social and economic consequences of depression’.
152   II,     9.  5.  7|              study)~OECD~Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development~
153  III,    10.  1    |                  occupational, political, economic and health care environment
154  III,    10.  1    |              determinants are the general economic, cultural and environmental
155  III,    10.  1    |                shape the society, such as economic and labour market conditions
156  III,    10.  1    |                   cultural, societal, and economic factors, as well as the
157  III,    10.  1.  1|              several social, cultural and economic factors. One potential explanation
158  III,    10.  1.  3|               health and disease: Social, economic, and cultural environment
159  III,    10.  2.  1|          Community Household Panel~ECOSOC~Economic and Social Council~EHIS~
160  III,    10.  2.  1|             therpay~OECD~Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development~
161  III,    10.  2.  1|                tobacco use (WHO, 2002).~ ~Economic burden~ ~The economic burden
162  III,    10.  2.  1|                     Economic burden~ ~The economic burden of smoking probably
163  III,    10.  2.  1|                 social, environmental and economic consequences of tobacco
164  III,    10.  2.  1|                   within the remit of the Economic and Social Council (ECO ).
165  III,    10.  2.  1|                bring further improvement. Economic evidence shows that tobacco
166  III,    10.  2.  1|            Children~OECD~Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development~
167  III,    10.  2.  1|               database~ ~Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (
168  III,    10.  2.  1|                   in the European Union~ ~Economic costs of alcohol consumption~ ~
169  III,    10.  2.  1|            drinkers.~ ~Alcohol is a major economic commodity associated to
170  III,    10.  2.  1|              important oral hygiene-based economic sector. Almost all experts
171  III,    10.  2.  1|            disease that had major health, economic and social effects on all
172  III,    10.  2.  1|        methodological guarantees exist.~ ~Economic impact of oral hygiene~ ~
173  III,    10.  2.  1|             regardless of their social or economic status. Salt and milk fluoridation
174  III,    10.  2.  1|                  Petersen, 2003). Social, economic and cultural factors and
175  III,    10.  2.  1|                 obesity, plus an alarming economic price to pay for physical
176  III,    10.  2.  1|                   Martin BW et al (2001): Economic benefits of the health-enhancing
177  III,    10.  2.  1|                 Food~UNECE~United Nations Economic Commission for Europe~ ~ ~
178  III,    10.  2.  1|                and obesity also impose an economic burden on society through
179  III,    10.  2.  4|         Bio-Economy~OECD~Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development~
180  III,    10.  2.  4|              particularly considering the economic, ethical, legal and social
181  III,    10.  2.  4|                the key industries for the economic future of Europe and genomics
182  III,    10.  2.  4|              particularly considering the economic, ethical, legal and social
183  III,    10.  3.  1|           differently with respect to the economic sectors. Employees working
184  III,    10.  3.  1|                  at work in the EU 25, by economic sector~ ~
185  III,    10.  3.  2|             Program~OECD~Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development
186  III,    10.  3.  2|           Equivalent~UNECE~United Nations Economic Commission for Europe~UNEP~
187  III,    10.  3.  2|                major contributions to our economic wealth and individual comfort.
188  III,    10.  3.  2|          industrial group with respect to economic turn-over. European legislation
189  III,    10.  3.  2|                  faster than the GDP. The economic cost of late action — both
190  III,    10.  3.  2|          environmental pollution but also economic losses. Chemical spills
191  III,    10.  3.  2|                  is also one of the major economic activities in SEE and the
192  III,    10.  3.  2|              polluter paysprinciple and economic responsibility for damage
193  III,    10.  3.  2|            cadmium (htt ~ ~United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) (
194  III,    10.  3.  4|                   and billions of euro of economic loss each year in the WHO
195  III,    10.  3.  4|                 people, with an estimated economic damage of more than 78.000
196  III,    10.  3.  4|                risk which are threatening economic development as well as social
197  III,    10.  3.  4|                  the heatwave caused also economic damages. France and Italy
198  III,    10.  3.  4|                and Spain 880 Million US $ economic damage. ~ ~Some crucial
199  III,    10.  3.  4|               Figure 10.3.4.2). The total economic damage in the past sixteen
200  III,    10.  3.  4|                   impact on health and on economic stability as well as by
201  III,    10.  3.  4|                septic pits. The resulting economic losses affected a wider
202  III,    10.  3.  4|             health-related flood hazards, economic conditions, structural and
203  III,    10.  4.  1|            North-West Europe, despite the economic growth, legislation on air
204  III,    10.  4.  1|         associated abatement measures and economic instruments, have led to
205  III,    10.  4.  1|                similar trend.~ ~In EECCA, economic recovery and the growth
206  III,    10.  4.  2|        Spectrometry~OECD~Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development~
207  III,    10.  4.  2|                   to the entireEuropean Economic Area” which includes, besides
208  III,    10.  4.  2|                      The Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development(
209  III,    10.  4.  2|            edition~ ~The Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development(
210  III,    10.  4.  3|                 Rate~UNECE~United Nations Economic Commission for Europe~WFD~
211  III,    10.  4.  3|                important recreational and economic value for many European
212  III,    10.  4.  3|             policies~ ~The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE)
213  III,    10.  4.  3|                  2146.~The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) (
214  III,    10.  4.  3|                        The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) (
215  III,    10.  4.  5|                 upon which marine-related economic and social activities depend.~ ~
216  III,    10.  4.  5|                that it increases with the economic activity. Data derived from
217  III,    10.  4.  5|       inconclusive.~ ~Usually, increasing economic activity means more waste
218  III,    10.  4.  5|                   waste generation. Since economic growth is the predominant
219  III,    10.  4.  5|                countries and in different economic sectors.~ ~DG Environment220  III,    10.  4.  5|            growing due to the increase in economic activity. Economic growth
221  III,    10.  4.  5|            increase in economic activity. Economic growth has proven to be
222  III,    10.  4.  5|                  resulted from increasing economic activity since the mid nineties,
223  III,    10.  4.  5|                one of the main drivers of economic growth in the EU-15. In
224  III,    10.  4.  5|                  of soil pollution across economic sectors differs from country
225  III,    10.  4.  5|        development (EEA, 2007b).~ ~Due to economic and logistical reasons,
226  III,    10.  4.  5|                out of Europe, there is an economic incentive to export hazardous
227  III,    10.  5.  1|               Demography, Social Aspects, Economic Aspects, Civic Involvement,
228  III,    10.  5.  1|                public housing. Journal of Economic Entomology, 97:559569.~
229  III,    10.  5.  1|              Nations~UNECE~United Nations Economic Commission for Europe~UN-HABITAT~
230  III,    10.  5.  2|                   of such side-effects of economic integration initiatives
231  III,    10.  5.  2|         Association~OECD~Organization for Economic Co-operation and~PHARE~Poland
232  III,    10.  5.  3|         employment status, occupations or economic sectors and as such can
233  III,    10.  5.  3|             stratified by occupations and economic sectors as well as socio-demographic
234  III,    10.  5.  3|                  according to occupations economic branches and other work-related
235  III,    10.  5.  3|          mortality across occupations and economic sectors. Furthermore, disease
236  III,    10.  5.  3|                  per worker with absence. Economic sectors are very differently
237  III,    10.  5.  3|              public health relevance.~The economic burden of CVD in the EU25
238  III,    10.  5.  3|                course of the illness, the economic burden associated to mental
239  III,    10.  5.  3|                syndrome (Table 10.5.3.3).~Economic sectors are very differently
240  III,    10.  5.  3|                 occupational diseases per economic sector~ ~According to a
241  III,    10.  5.  3|                  the previous and current economic activities. E.g. in Belgium
242  III,    10.  5.  3|                   very differently across economic sectors. Table 10.5.3.7
243  III,    10.  5.  3|              accidents at work in EU15 by economic activity (rate per 100 000
244  III,    10.  5.  3|              problems with respect to the economic sectors. Again it becomes
245  III,    10.  5.  3|                 work-related symptoms per economic sector~ ~Working conditions~ ~
246  III,    10.  5.  3|                  the next six months.~The economic sectors most affected by
247  III,    10.  5.  3|                 risks factors at work per economic sector~ ~Workers in agriculture
248  III,    10.  5.  3|           differently with respect to the economic sectors (table 10.5.3.14).
249  III,    10.  5.  3|                 risks factors at work per economic sector.~ ~The changing world
250  III,    10.  5.  3|             response to globalisation and economic pressures, companies have
251  III,    10.  5.  3|                  dominant topic in recent economic history. Liberalisation
252  III,    10.  5.  3|     qualifications~The current process of economic and technological transformation
253  III,    10.  5.  3|        skill-biased nature of the current economic and technological transformation,
254  III,    10.  5.  3|              health burden, suffering and economic loss amounting to 45% of
255  III,    10.  5.  3|               employees as well as on the economic position of enterprises.
256  III,    10.  5.  3| return-on-investment.~With respect to the economic effects, a summary evaluation
257  III,    10.  5.  3|                  Summed up, this positive economic effect is a most powerful
258  III,    10.  5.  3|                2004b): Health-related and economic benefits of workplace health promotion
259  III,    10.  5.  3|              Peterson S, Rayner M (2005): Economic burden of cardiovascular
260  III,    10.  6.  2|           interlinked) factors: a rise in economic insecurity and poverty;
261  III,    10.  6.  2|                   important political and economic change is not unavoidable.~ ~
262  III,    10.  6.  2|               policy areas including:~ ~· Economic, employment and social policy -
263  III,    10.  6.  2|                   influence in society~2. Economic and social security~3. Secure
264  III,    10.  6.  3|                 and undermines social and economic conditions in society. No
265  III,    10.  6.  3|               larger cultural, social and economic factors that contribute
266   IV,    11.  1.  3|               time of rapid political and economic transition, first following
267   IV,    11.  1.  5|                   the safe, effective and economic use of medicines in hospitals
268   IV,    11.  1.  5|              observations that beyond the economic rewards of financial incentives,
269   IV,    11.  1.  5|              differences in expectations, economic climate, or political dissatisfaction.~ ~
270   IV,    11.  1.  6|            service sector such as health. Economic theory presents one of the
271   IV,    11.  1.  6|                   within the scope of the economic literature on principal-agent
272   IV,    11.  2.  2|                   the current thinking of economic evaluation in the area of
273   IV,    11.  2.  2|                and that the mechanisms of economic appraisal can and should
274   IV,    11.  3.  2|         innovative medicines, and provide economic incentives for the industry
275   IV,    11.  3.  2|               arrangements. Increasingly, economic evaluation is being used
276   IV,    11.  3.  2|               countries are now including economic concepts in applying for
277   IV,    11.  3.  2|                  linked to the results of economic evaluation, but in many
278   IV,    11.  3.  2|                   and the Baltic States), economic evidence is considered to
279   IV,    11.  4    |              medical, social, ethical and economic implications of development,
280   IV,    11.  4    |                   on the medical, social, economic and ethical issues related
281   IV,    11.  4    |                    Informatics research~ ~Economic aspects~ ~General economic
282   IV,    11.  4    |                Economic aspects~ ~General economic theory~· Macroeconomics~·
283   IV,    11.  4    |                   Microeconomics~· Health economic methods such as~· Modelling
284   IV,    11.  4    |             patient preferences in health economic analysis~Information and
285   IV,    11.  4    |           epidemiological, psychological, economic or other relevant research~·
286   IV,    11.  4    |              Health information including economic information from population
287   IV,    11.  4    |                  evidence, accompanied by economic evaluation and a review
288   IV,    11.  5.  4|                 other important cultural, economic or social factors that influence
289   IV,    11.  5.  4|                   the Union but have less economic means to address them. Their
290   IV,    11.  5.  5|                    in such a way that the economic efforts are centred on a
291   IV,    11.  6.  1|                the 1970s a combination of economic recession following the
292   IV,    11.  6.  1|            countries that are part of the Economic and Monetary Union), cutting
293   IV,    11.  6.  1|               care expenditure but rather economic growth. For example, in
294   IV,    11.  6.  1|                  For example, in Ireland, economic growth of 8.8% in the 1990s
295   IV,    11.  6.  1|             slowed in the 1990s as severe economic recession resulted in large-scale
296   IV,    11.  6.  1|                  structural changes (e.g. economic and demographic structure),
297   IV,    11.  6.  2|                   countries following the economic transition, 2) an increasing
298   IV,    11.  6.  2|                  mixture of political and economic reasons (Preker et al. 2002).
299   IV,    11.  6.  2|                rise resulting in negative economic implications. This was in
300   IV,    11.  6.  2|                  the basis of traditional economic theory, it is argued that
301   IV,    11.  6.  3|             health insurance and negative economic effects of linking insurance
302   IV,    11.  6.  4|               Denmark, require the use of economic evaluations in reimbursement
303   IV,    11.  6.  4|          effectiveness, and not purely in economic terms. Best practice and
304   IV,    11.  6.  4|                  both epidemiological and economic aspects. Moreover, in order
305   IV,    11.  6.  5|                   McDaid D et al. (2005): Economic appraisal of public health
306   IV,    11.  6.  5|                   within Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (
307   IV,    11.  6.  5|                   Paris, Organisation for economic co-operation and development.~ ~
308   IV,    11.  6.  5|                    comment." The American Economic Review 58: 531-537.~ ~Perleth
309   IV,    11.  6.  5|               target income hypothesis an economic heresy?" Medical Care Research
310   IV,    11.  6.  5|                Relationships." Journal of Economic Perspectives 5(2): 45-66.~ ~
311   IV,    11.  6.  5|               across OECD countries. OECD Economic Studies No. 38. Paris, Organisation
312   IV,    11.  6.  5|                   Paris, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.~ ~
313   IV,    11.  6.  5|                   Paris, Organisation for economic co-operation and development.~ ~
314   IV,    11.  6.  5|                   Paris, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.~ ~
315   IV,    12.Acr    |         Regulations~OECD~Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development~
316   IV,    12.  1    |               initiative through a purely economic Community to become a European
317   IV,    12.  1    |              become a European Union with economic, social and political dimension.
318   IV,    12.  1    |                has been a major driver of economic growth and competitiveness
319   IV,    12.  1    |                  and after consulting the Economic and Social Committee and
320   IV,    12.  1    |         protecting the health, safety and economic interests of consumers”.~ ~
321   IV,    12.  1    |               consumers”.~ ~Art. 158-161 (Economic and social cohesion: for
322   IV,    12.  2    |                  links between health and economic prosperity, integrating
323   IV,    12.  2    |                 social, environmental and economic consequences of tobacco
324   IV,    12.  2    |                   within the remit of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC).
325   IV,    12.  2    |            drinkers.~ ~Alcohol is a major economic commodity that is associated
326   IV,    12.  4    |                  Promotion of sport~ECFIN~Economic projections re: demographic
327   IV,    12.  4    |            including through 'Regions~for Economic Change'~RELEX~Relations
328   IV,    12.  8    |                 of Rome, establishing the Economic European Community, was
329   IV,    12.  8    |               improvement.~ ~The European Economic Area~ ~Since 1992, the European
330   IV,    12.  8    |               form the so-called European Economic Area. Protocol 31 to this
331   IV,    12.  9    |                 with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (
332   IV,    12. 10    |                high political, social and economic importance and subject to
333   IV,    12. 10    |            provide the citizens with some economic initiatives (e.g discounts
334   IV,    12. 10    |                   domains 6-11 as well as economic security, labour market,
335   IV,    12. 10    |             health (tobacco and alcohol), economic security, integration, housing,
336   IV,    12. 10    |                objective and policy areas~Economic conditions~Income inequality~ ~
337   IV,    12. 10    |                     Proportion with a low economic standard among families
338   IV,    12. 10    |                   young people with a low economic standard~Domain of objective
339   IV,    12. 10    |                   influence in society~2. Economic and social security~3. Secure
340   IV,    13.Acr    |                 OECD~Organization for the Economic Cooperation and Development~
341   IV,    13.  3    |                   Directorate-General for Economic and Financial Affairs, released
342   IV,    13.  3    |                   The current thinking of economic evaluations and the mechanism
343   IV,    13.  3    |          evaluations and the mechanism of economic appraisal can and should
344   IV,    13.  3    |             policies, for reasons of both economic efficiency and social equity.
345   IV,    13.  3    |               across Europe, although the economic scene is currently complicated
346   IV,    13.  3    |               complicated by the on-going economic crisis. Moreover, healthy
347   IV,    13.  4    |              opening of legal channels to economic migration;~· Promoting a
348   IV,    13.  4    |                 appropriate management of economic migration. In the context
349   IV,    13.  6.  1|                  Their focus is primarily economic and on the effect on the
350   IV,    13.  6.  1|                   in turn have an adverse economic impact on the whole family.
351   IV,    13.  7.  2|                 overcome also becoming an economic zone that could generate
352   IV,    13.  7.  2|                 markets”.~ ~The potential economic advantages of the “Lead
353   IV,    13.  8    |                  contribute to social and economic change. As correctly stated
354   IV,    13.  9    |              Neurol 12 Suppl 1:1-27.~EPC (Economic Policy Committee) (2006):