Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  2        |            Member Stateswhilst the differences in travel habits open a
  2    I,     2.  2        |             that, without significant differences between old and new Member
  3    I,     2.  4        |              indicators of the wealth differences existing between countries
  4    I,     2.  4        |               clearly show that large differences existing among EU Member
  5    I,     2.  4        |         European countries, mortality differences between socio-economic groups
  6    I,     2.  4        |           example, a study looking at differences in mortality by level of
  7    I,     2.  4        |             to linguistic or cultural differences. Few have begun to address
  8    I,     2.  4        |    comprehensively by reducing social differences, preventing the ensuing
  9    I,     2.  4        |         preventing the ensuing health differences, or addressing the poor
 10    I,     2.  5        |               3 shows the significant differences existing among unemployment
 11    I,     2.  5        |              this aspect. Traditional differences remain in the type of jobs
 12    I,     2.  6        |           promote health. Significant differences are shown among EU Member
 13    I,     2.  7        |    characteristics of the urban-rural differences, as in many countries there
 14   II,     4.  1        |              However, the significant differences in longevity observed across
 15   II,     4.  1        |          moreover, we will debate the differences between genders and the
 16   II,     4.  1        |             out that, due to cultural differences in reporting one’s own health,
 17   II,     4.  1        |         between genders. These gender differences may be a result of differential
 18   II,     4.  1        |        concept will minimise cultural differences in the comprehension of
 19   II,     4.  2        |               groups; there have been differences between men and women, and
 20   II,     4.  2        |            even though there are some differences among countries in the relative
 21   II,     4.  2        |       countries. There are remarkable differences across countries in the
 22   II,     4.  2        |              this may have to do with differences in the practice of coding
 23   II,     4.  2        |          countries. In spite of these differences across European countries,
 24   II,     4.  2        |         European countries is whether differences are likely to become smaller
 25   II,     4.  3        |          since 1995: similarities and differences between the 25 EU countries.
 26   II,     5.  1.  1    |        smoking are crucial to explain differences in IHD. Among all CVD risk
 27   II,     5.  1.  1    |           diabetes and smoking habit. Differences exist in the methodology
 28   II,     5.  2.  2    |               necessary to understand differences among countries in order
 29   II,     5.  2.  2    |        smoking are crucial to explain differences in IHD. Among all CVD risk
 30   II,     5.  2.  2    |             and smoking habit. Due to differences among countries in the methodology
 31   II,     5.  2.  3    |           discharges. There are great differences between hospitalization
 32   II,     5.  2.  3    |             in most countries but the differences narrow considerably above
 33   II,     5.  2.  3    |               highlighted substantial differences among countries.~ ~Table
 34   II,     5.  2.  4    |              Wellman J, 2004).~Due to differences in data collection methodology (
 35   II,     5.  2.  4    |              CVD can be attributed to differences in ‘classical risk factors’
 36   II,     5.  2.  6    |     consideration the pharmacological differences among these compounds and
 37   II,     5.  3.  2    |       surveillance system to describe differences, identity problems and promote
 38   II,     5.  3.  2    |            set to measure and explain differences in cancer survival rates
 39   II,     5.  3.  2    |              so as to interpret these differences. The four phases of the
 40   II,     5.  3.  6    |           survival trends and country differences in survival. The EUROCARE-3
 41   II,     5.  3.  6    |             programmes. This suggests differences in the availability of effective
 42   II,     5.  3.  6    |               decreases in geographic differences over time, which are mainly
 43   II,     5.  3.  6    |               account for most of the differences noticed in outcomes.~ ~
 44   II,     5.  3.  7    |              practice~ ~International differences and trends in cancer survival
 45   II,     5.  3.  7    |          consistent with geographical differences or trends in the type of
 46   II,     5.  3.  7    |           that international survival differences are at least partly attributable
 47   II,     5.  3.  7    |              of intervention, such as differences in stage at diagnosis, access
 48   II,     5.  3.  7    |              Europe:~· There are wide differences in the teaching of oncology (
 49   II,     5.  3.  7    |           given to individuals. These differences require research to identify
 50   II,     5.  4.  1    |               3 years. Very important differences in prevalence are observed
 51   II,     5.  4.  1    |              involved in the process.~Differences in the possibility to ensure
 52   II,     5.  4.  1    |       economic, geographic and ethnic differences. (Smith, 2007; Dyhr, 2007;
 53   II,     5.  4.  2    |              and imprecise estimates. Differences between different national
 54   II,     5.  5.Int(12)|           Hallstrom, T. (2001) Gender differences in mental health. In P.
 55   II,     5.  5.  1    |             vary, but also because of differences in organising mental health
 56   II,     5.  5.  1    |      beginning of the 2000s. National differences are possible due to differences
 57   II,     5.  5.  1    |       differences are possible due to differences in ICD interpretation regardless
 58   II,     5.  5.  1    |              to care is influenced by differences between countries in the
 59   II,     5.  5.  1    |             WHO EURO databases due to differences in presenting the data.~ ~
 60   II,     5.  5.  1    |        developments~ ~In spite of the differences and the increasing activity
 61   II,     5.  5.  1    |            2000 Investigators (2007). Differences in lifetime use of services
 62   II,     5.  5.  2    |              by each study, there are differences in the resulting prevalence
 63   II,     5.  5.  2    |              dementia.~ ~There may be differences in the distribution of different
 64   II,     5.  5.  3    |               Adolescents show gender differences in dissatisfaction with
 65   II,     5.  5.  3    |             not take into account the differences in the national healthcare
 66   II,     5.  5.  3    |             be the consequence of the differences between European mental
 67   II,     5.  5.  3    |          country or cultural specific differences in prevalence and in certain
 68   II,     5.  5.  3    |             further evaluate regional differences, we looked for the absolute
 69   II,     5.  5.  3    |            this cannot only be due to differences in psychiatric care, actually
 70   II,     5.  5.  3    |              likely that they express differences in the cause of deaths assignment.~
 71   II,     5.  5.  3    |              would be no considerable differences. This points to the necessity
 72   II,     5.  5.  3    |               might in part be due to differences in the mental health care
 73   II,     5.  5.  3    |         extent of variation is due to differences in the national health information
 74   II,     5.  5.  3    |               is difficult because of differences between the specific circumstances
 75   II,     5.  5.  3    |       practice also shows significant differences across European countries.
 76   II,     5.  5.  3    |              Fricke and Pirck, 2004). Differences in usage of second generation
 77   II,     5.  5.  3    |     Organization (WHO) (1997): Gender differences in the epidemiology of affective
 78   II,     5.  5.  3    |      agreement on case definition and differences in case finding methods
 79   II,     5.  5.  3    |              and do not explain major differences in reported prevalence over
 80   II,     5.  5.  3    |               fully explain the major differences in reported prevalence over
 81   II,     5.  5.  3    |            Forsgren et al, 2005). The differences are mostly explained by
 82   II,     5.  5.  3    |             et al, 1990). Some of the differences between the Icelandic and
 83   II,     5.  5.  3    |                despite methodological differences, the north-to-south latitudinal
 84   II,     5.  5.  3    |              97.~In Finland, regional differences in MS prevalence and incidence
 85   II,     5.  5.  3    |          studies showed that regional differences applied to prevalence but
 86   II,     5.  5.  3    |             biological factors, i.e., differences in environmental exposures,
 87   II,     5.  5.  3    |        susceptibility underlying such differences cannot be ruled out. Mean
 88   II,     5.  5.  3    |        relevant factor underlying the differences in MS distribution.~A general
 89   II,     5.  5.  3    |             adjusting for price level differences in different sectors between
 90   II,     5.  5.  3    |             disease or to demographic differences but to pre-morbid personality,
 91   II,     5.  5.  3    |         Finland: incidence trends and differences in relapsing remitting and
 92   II,     5.  5.  3    |             may be the consequence of differences in methodology, population
 93   II,     5.  5.  3    |      potential source of variation is differences in diagnostic criteria.It
 94   II,     5.  5.  3    |              community-based studies. Differences in methods for case ascertainment
 95   II,     5.  5.  3    |               for prevalence studies, differences in methodology have a considerable
 96   II,     5.  5.  3    |             al, 2003). Methodological differences account for the different
 97   II,     5.  5.  3    |               in their results due to differences in methodology.~Our estimates
 98   II,     5.  5.  3    |          practice. Although there are differences when addressing specific
 99   II,     5.  6.  3    |             countries. However, major differences in the epidemiology of risk
100   II,     5.  6.  3    |     understand whether there are real differences between countries. Point
101   II,     5.  6.  6    |        general population: studies of differences in age, gender, social class,
102   II,     5.  7.  3    |       Although there are considerable differences in absolute incidence rates
103   II,     5.  7.  3    |         Europe there are considerable differences in patient survival (van
104   II,     5.  7.  3    |       Although there are considerable differences in absolute incidence rates
105   II,     5.  7.  4    |              Apart from international differences in the incidence rates of
106   II,     5.  7.  4    |             RRT for diabetic ESRD and differences in stages of economic development
107   II,     5.  7.  4    |           causes for the considerable differences in the overall incidence
108   II,     5.  8.  3    |          smokers, with no significant differences between men and women.~ ~
109   II,     5.  8.  4    |          smokers, with no significant differences between men and women. The
110   II,     5.  8.  4    |               and 1996 gender-related differences decreased, and COPD spread
111   II,     5.  8.  4    |             data, probably because of differences in the methods used for
112   II,     5.  8.  7    |              Saetta M, Papi A (2003): Differences in airway inflammation in
113   II,     5.  9. FB    |               bottle-fed ones, but no differences between the two groups were
114   II,     5.  9.  3    |           that there are considerable differences among European countries.~ ~
115   II,     5.  9.  4    |          whole sample was 9%, without differences between age groups. Farm
116   II,     5.  9.  4    |               the role of qualitative differences in particulate air pollution
117   II,     5.  9.  4    |             coarse PM. No significant differences were observed between locations
118   II,     5.  9.  4    |         coarse PM fractions. However, differences in the content of these
119   II,     5. 10.  2    |         information on sex and gender differences has been collected, although
120   II,     5. 10.  3    |            limited due to significant differences in potential of exposure,
121   II,     5. 11.  3    |               than white children, no differences in prevalence rates were
122   II,     5. 11.  3    |          significant. The significant differences in prevalence between females
123   II,     5. 13        | physical activity. There are distinct differences in the Northern and Southern (
124   II,     5. 13        |         though the dimension of these differences can vary between men and
125   II,     5. 14.  3    |             65-74 present significant differences for what concerns the rate
126   II,     5. 14.  3    |                in Netherlands). These differences are related to sanitary
127   II,     5. 14.  3    |               and 2000, with variable differences according to the country (Wid m
128   II,     6.  2        |              improved. There are huge differences of accuracy, and hence usefulness,
129   II,     6.  3.  1    |        mention inherent socioeconomic differences. Whilst the main responsibility
130   II,     6.  3.  2    |             there may be big regional differences within countries, which
131   II,     6.  3.  2    |        Additionally, there are marked differences in the type of antibiotics
132   II,     6.  3.  2    |         sometimes disguising regional differences within countries. Ideally,
133   II,     6.  3.  3    |       countries are also inhibited by differences in data collection. Screening
134   II,     6.  3.  6    |              for many diseases, large differences between surveillance systems
135   II,     6.  3.  6    |      countries are complicated due to differences in the surveillance systems.~ ~
136   II,     7.  1        |                2007). There are large differences in the occurrence of injuries
137   II,     7.  3.  3    |               Austria, which reflects differences in national hospital admission
138   II,     7.  3.  4    |          between Member States due to differences in national definitions
139   II,     7.  3.  5    |             the 1-4 age group. Again, differences between countries in the
140   II,     8.  1.  1    |           from disability. Functional differences are measured along three
141   II,     8.  1.  3    |               to be involved in work.~Differences among countries vary widely,
142   II,     8.  1.  3    |               data may be affected by differences in self-perception of the
143   II,     8.  1.  3    |           with no restrictions. These differences are also reflected in the
144   II,     8.  1.  3    |           provided and needed~ ~Broad differences exist in the provision of
145   II,     8.  1.  3    |         genders) with no limitations. Differences in earnings reflect differences
146   II,     8.  1.  3    |       Differences in earnings reflect differences in educational and occupational
147   II,     9            |              most recent year~ ~Fi ~ ~Differences between the new and old
148   II,     9            |            the study of socioeconomic differences emphasizes the importance
149   II,     9            |      decreases with age, though great differences exist between countries
150   II,     9.  1.  1    |               have improved, absolute differences in mortality rates between
151   II,     9.  1.  1    |         Latvia and Romania. There are differences in rates of neonatal mortality
152   II,     9.  1.  1    |             trends and understand the differences observed between countries,
153   II,     9.  1.  1    |             and consequences of these differences.~ ~It is increasingly understood
154   II,     9.  1.  1    |               Luton D, Blot P (2002): Differences in management and results
155   II,     9.  1.  1    |              RS (1989): Socioeconomic differences in rates of cesarean section.
156   II,     9.  1.  2    |           type of congenital anomaly. Differences between countries in infant
157   II,     9.  1.  2    |               policies and practices, differences in uptake of screening and
158   II,     9.  1.  2    |           organisational factors, and differences in TOPFA laws, influence
159   II,     9.  1.  2    |               5% (Table 9.1.2.3). The differences in total mortality (TOPFA
160   II,     9.  1.  2    |             but is also influenced by differences between countries in the
161   II,     9.  1.  2    |             prevalence corresponds to differences in maternal age profile
162   II,     9.  1.  2    |           maternal age. In 2000-2004, differences in policy and practice regarding
163   II,     9.  1.  2    |               as well as maternal age differences, resulted in an over four-fold
164   II,     9.  1.  2    |              most apparent geographic differences are represented by the lower
165   II,     9.  1.  2    |               in new members States~ ~Differences between the new and old
166   II,     9.  1.  2    |            the study of socioeconomic differences emphasizes the importance
167   II,     9.  1.  2    |         available about socioeconomic differences in congenital anomaly risk
168   II,     9.  1.  2    |              may result from cultural differences underlying policy or individual
169   II,     9.  1.  2    |  implementation of screening, or from differences in organization, resources
170   II,     9.  2.  2    |           food availability. Distinct differences are seen between the Northern
171   II,     9.  2.  3(2) |        episodes, and the considerable differences in diagnostic labelling
172   II,     9.  3.  1    |         equally.~ ~The key biological differences have been identified between
173   II,     9.  3.  1    |              pain.~ ~The above listed differences can only partially account
174   II,     9.  3.  1    |          Neither can these biological differences explain the large country
175   II,     9.  3.  1    |              are clear and consistent differences in the patterns of mental
176   II,     9.  3.  1    | revascularization. Reasons for gender differences are thought to include greater
177   II,     9.  3.  1    |            are striking inter-country differences among men: in Europe, per
178   II,     9.  3.  1    |             is reason to believe that differences in coding practices may
179   II,     9.  3.  1    |               may explain some of the differences observed in reported rates
180   II,     9.  3.  1    |   osteoporosis. There are substantial differences in the descriptive epidemiology
181   II,     9.  3.  2    |               births, whilst observed differences are not statistically significant.~ ~
182   II,     9.  3.  2    |           babies - and understand the differences observed between countries,
183   II,     9.  3.  2    |               is illustrative of wide differences in the European approaches
184   II,     9.  3.  2    |            services explain the large differences between EU Member States.~ ~
185   II,     9.  3.  2    |               Luton D, Blot P (2002): Differences in management and results
186   II,     9.  3.  2    |              RS (1989): Socioeconomic differences in rates of cesarean section.
187   II,     9.  3.  3    |              et al, 2004). The gender differences are wide. Among boys, positive
188   II,     9.  3.  3    |            supports the evidence that differences in attitudes and behaviour
189   II,     9.  3.  3    |             al, 2004). Cross-national differences undoubtedly reflect fundamental
190   II,     9.  3.  3    |             religious and educational differences across countries, as well
191   II,     9.  3.  3    |          across countries, as well as differences in public policy. The most
192   II,     9.  4.  2    |        diseases and the socioeconomic differences in their prevalence. Large
193   II,     9.  4.  2    |          addition, there are cultural differences which may influence the
194   II,     9.  4.  3    |             women and men show marked differences. Women’s longevity makes
195   II,     9.  4.  3    |             what extent the incidence differences reflect true variation in
196   II,     9.  4.  3    |              socio-economic group, or differences in access to screening (
197   II,     9.  4.  3    |              aged individuals. Gender differences have been highlighted, with
198   II,     9.  4.  4    |      decreases with age, though great differences exist between countries
199   II,     9.  4.  5    |           will be influenced by these differences in education level, and
200   II,     9.  5.  1    |          biological and physiological differences between men and women, “
201   II,     9.  5.  1    |         changes in a given context.~ ~Differences in prevalence / incidence,
202   II,     9.  5.  1    |             vary between the genders. Differences in health behaviour (e.g.
203   II,     9.  5.  1    |     components contributing to gender differences in health and longevity.
204   II,     9.  5.  1    |          responsible for the observed differences in longevity, health and
205   II,     9.  5.  1    |     associated not only to biological differences between men and women and
206   II,     9.  5.  1    |              in men seem to be due to differences in gender norms about risk-taking
207   II,     9.  5.  1    |      protection. The described gender differences contribute to inequalities
208   II,     9.  5.  1    |              a lack of data on gender differences in health and changing gender
209   II,     9.  5.  1    |              2004).~ ~The significant differences in the way men and women
210   II,     9.  5.  2    |               understanding of gender differences in the use of health and
211   II,     9.  5.  3    |             1998).~ ~Table 9.5.1. Sex differences in the prevalence of mental
212   II,     9.  5.  3    |                Suicide Rates~ ~Gender differences are apparent in the patterns
213   II,     9.  5.  3    |           symptoms. There may also be differences in access to specific treatments
214   II,     9.  5.  3    |             are some important gender differences in smoking behaviour. About
215   II,     9.  5.  3    | physical activity. There are distinct differences in the northern and southern (
216   II,     9.  5.  3    |         though the dimension of these differences can vary between men and
217   II,     9.  5.  3    |           Foundation, 2006).~ ~Gender differences have been observed in care
218   II,     9.  5.  4    |         explanations for the existing differences;~· To ensure these methods
219   II,     9.  5.  6    |               Walter V (2004): Gender differences in health: a Canadian study
220   II,     9.  5.  6    |           Hällström T (2001): ‘Gender differences in mental health’, in Gender
221  III,    10.  2.  1    |           apparent, although regional differences do occur. There are countries
222  III,    10.  2.  1    |            past decades show that the differences in smoking prevalence for
223  III,    10.  2.  1    |             apply to younger men. The differences found reflect the tobacco
224  III,    10.  2.  1    |              to societal and cultural differences, it would be impossible
225  III,    10.  2.  1    |              to societal and cultural differences (European Comission, 2008).~ ~
226  III,    10.  2.  1    |        Grötvedt L (2000): Educational differences in smoking: international
227  III,    10.  2.  1    |                   Despite the present differences between countries, the recorded
228  III,    10.  2.  1    |              markers, possibly due to differences in vaccination levels.~ ~
229  III,    10.  2.  1    |              results show significant differences, with rates varying from
230  III,    10.  2.  1    |           varied around 60-70%. These differences may be related to environmental
231  III,    10.  2.  1    |            one study to another. Such differences are probably more a matter
232  III,    10.  2.  1    |              methodology than of real differences in the disease itself. At
233  III,    10.  2.  1    |             are applied to adjust for differences in the methods used such
234  III,    10.  2.  1    |               Moreover, socioeconomic differences in the validity of self-reports
235  III,    10.  2.  1    |               step 2 and 3, important differences play a role. For example
236  III,    10.  2.  1    |               Z (2004): Interregional differences in health in Slovenia, I:
237  III,    10.  2.  4    |          multiple genomic and protein differences among malignancies such
238  III,    10.  3.  1    |           weighted in accordance with differences in hearing sensitivity at
239  III,    10.  3.  1    |             measures have to consider differences in exposure for different
240  III,    10.  3.  1    |            non-harmonised way. Due to differences in methodologies as assessments
241  III,    10.  3.  1    |                but there are regional differences due to the presence of radon.
242  III,    10.  3.  1    |             traffic). However, due to differences in the measurement of annoyance
243  III,    10.  3.  1    |      countries are mainly hampered by differences in the availability of input
244  III,    10.  3.  1    |       annoyance rates are hampered by differences in the measurement and definition
245  III,    10.  3.  2    |         countries and indicated major differences between countries from lipid-based
246  III,    10.  4.  2    |         knowledge and research needs. Differences in risk assessments and
247  III,    10.  4.  3    |        cautiously, as between-country differences are likely to reflect the
248  III,    10.  4.  3    |         reporting systems rather then differences in outbreaks; moreover,
249  III,    10.  4.  5    |             but there are significant differences between countries – from
250  III,    10.  4.  5    |              However, there are large differences between individual countries,
251  III,    10.  4.  5    |         Figure 10.4.5.2.3). The large differences in generation statistics
252  III,    10.  5.  2    |              looking into urban-rural differences, a key challenge is always
253  III,    10.  5.  2    |             the existing quantitative differences (Eurofound, 2006). In the
254  III,    10.  5.  2    |               in poorer countries the differences between urban and rural
255  III,    10.  5.  2    |               evidence on educational differences, with rural residents being
256  III,    10.  5.  2    |    conflicting evidence on the health differences between urban and rural settings.
257  III,    10.  5.  2    |             is available on mortality differences and life expectancy in urban
258  III,    10.  5.  2    |             there are striking gender differences for individual countries.
259  III,    10.  5.  2    |             than in most rural areas. Differences in death rates between rural
260  III,    10.  5.  2    |               mortality and morbidity differences implies to consider the
261  III,    10.  5.  2    |              consider the demographic differences as well, i.e. account all
262  III,    10.  5.  2    |     statements on the urban and rural differences of health status are only
263  III,    10.  5.  2    |             quickly changing and that differences in urban places may become
264  III,    10.  5.  2    |               may reduce the existing differences described above. Most of
265  III,    10.  5.  2    |              dimension of urban-rural differences in population health. Therefore,
266  III,    10.  5.  2    |              Life Survey: Urban-rural differences. Luxembourg.~ ~Eurostat (
267  III,    10.  5.  2    |               health care utilization differences. Presentation held by Jouke
268  III,    10.  5.  2    |             Urban-rural mental health differences in Great Britain: findings
269  III,    10.  5.  3(44)|             that the observed country differences may reflect cultural awareness
270  III,    10.  5.  3    |               this issue. Traditional differences remain in the types of jobs
271  III,    10.  6.  2    |          European countries mortality differences between socio-economic groups
272  III,    10.  6.  2    |                a study looking at the differences in mortality per level of
273  III,    10.  6.  2    |             to linguistic or cultural differences. Few have begun to address
274  III,    10.  6.  2    |    comprehensively by reducing social differences, preventing the ensuing
275  III,    10.  6.  2    |         preventing the ensuing health differences or addressing the poor health
276  III,    10.  6.  2    |          health that results from the differences above. This would ensure
277  III,    10.  6.  2    |             JP (2005): Socio-economic differences in the prevalence of common
278   IV,    11.  1.  2    |      reliability, though definitional differences do exist across countries
279   IV,    11.  1.  3    |          chapter, there are important differences between each system, even
280   IV,    11.  1.  4    |          after standardizing for need differences has been compared across
281   IV,    11.  1.  5    |               2000). Moreover, due to differences in the way quality is measured
282   IV,    11.  1.  5    |              are useful for comparing differences in opinions across countries
283   IV,    11.  1.  5    |       subjective, while cross-country differences may reflect, among other
284   IV,    11.  1.  5    |          reflect, among other things, differences in expectations, economic
285   IV,    11.  1.  5    |             European region, cultural differences may be driving a large part
286   IV,    11.  1.  6    |             are needed to account for differences in hospital structure, region
287   IV,    11.  1.  6    |             slowly, but there were no differences for patients. In Belgium
288   IV,    11.  3.  1    |           differ across Europe. These differences range from the type of training
289   IV,    11.  3.  1    |            advance to the next level. Differences in training are gradually
290   IV,    11.  5.  4    |          donors. There are also large differences between Member Statessuccesses
291   IV,    11.  5.  4    |              see Figure 11.10). These differences cannot be easily explained.
292   IV,    11.  5.  4    |               6% to 42%. Again, these differences are not easy to understand.
293   IV,    11.  5.  4    |                there are considerable differences in organ donation and transplantation
294   IV,    11.  5.  4    |           address. This leads to huge differences between Member States in
295   IV,    11.  5.  5    |          Within the EU there are huge differences in access that cannot merely
296   IV,    11.  5.  5    |         cannot merely be explained by differences in donation rates. Accessibility
297   IV,    11.  6.  1    |            countries, owing partly to differences in methods and accuracy
298   IV,    11.  6.  4    |            There are also significant differences in the level of resources
299   IV,    11.  6.  4    |             the severity of cases and differences in clinical practice among
300   IV,    12.  2        |        detectable yet~ ~International differences and trends in cancer survival
301   IV,    12.  2        |          consistent with geographical differences or trends in the type of
302   IV,    12.  2        |           that international survival differences are at least partly attributable
303   IV,    12.  2        |              to intervention, such as differences in stage at diagnosis, access
304   IV,    12.  3        |          discrimination, property and differences among European regions.
305   IV,    12.  5        |               those related to gender differences, in order to contribute
306   IV,    12.  5        |             the genders. These gender differences may be a result of differential
307   IV,    12. 10        |               Besides focusing on sex differences and specificities, health
308   IV,    13.  1        |                                 13.1. Differences in selected mortality indicators
309   IV,    13.  1        |             clearly show major health differences occurring among different
310   IV,    13.  1        |           data see Table 13.3). Large differences have also been reported
311   IV,    13.  1        |               27~ ~These considerable differences clearly indicate that considerable
312   IV,    13.  1        |        reached by comparing the large differences among population groups
313   IV,    13.  2.  2    |               EBD indicators show big differences between people living in
314   IV,    13.  3        |           particularly from the large differences emerging for all the above-mentioned
315   IV,    13.  5        |          universal access. While some differences in provision are inevitable,
316   IV,    13.  5        |            main cause for significant differences in life expectancy observed
317   IV,    13.  5        |             to linguistic or cultural differences. However, only a few countries
318   IV,    13.  5        |    comprehensively by reducing social differences, preventing the ensuing
319   IV,    13.  5        |         preventing the ensuing health differences or addressing the resulting
320   IV,    13.  7.  2    |            still significant national differences between innovation leaders,
321   IV,    13.  7.  4    |            reasons often depending on differences in cultural, religion and
322   IV,    13.  7.  5    |             health monitoring, and of differences between the different national