Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.Acr    |           Standard Classification of Education~NMS~New Member States~PHG~
  2    I,     2.  1    |        skills as a result of greater education and training; and (iv) increased
  3    I,     2.  4    |            indicated by low level of education, occupational class, income
  4    I,     2.  4    |           those with lower levels of education, occupational class, or
  5    I,     2.  4    |             in mortality by level of education in Finland, Norway, Italy,
  6    I,     2.  4    |         people with higher levels of education have been able to protect
  7    I,     2.  4    |       chronic conditions by level of education among people aged 25-79
  8    I,     2.  5    |               public administration; education; health and social work;
  9    I,     2.  5    |              worker training (formal education, vocational training and
 10    I,     2.  6    |                                 2.6. Education~ ~Education is another important
 11    I,     2.  6    |                     2.6. Education~ ~Education is another important factor
 12    I,     2.  6    |             at least upper secondary education (Table 2.3) and of total
 13    I,     2.  6    |             at least upper secondary education in EU Member States, candidates
 14    I,     2.  6    |            completed upper secondary education. The indicator aims at measuring
 15    I,     2.  6    |        completion of upper secondary education can be achieved in European
 16    I,     2.  6    |           enrolled in tertiary level education (i.e. ISCED levels 5 or
 17    I,     2.  6    |     difference between the fields of education in which women and men successfully
 18    I,     2.  6    |             and teacher training and education programmes at ISCED level
 19    I,     2.  6    |            The number of enrolled in education in EU is expected to decline
 20    I,     2.  6    |             Commission, 2006).~While education is primarily publicly founded
 21    I,     2.  6    |            role. The share of public education expenditure varies across
 22    I,     2.  6    |            institutional setting for education and across ISCED levels
 23    I,     2.  6    |           and across ISCED levels of education. In most Member States,
 24    I,     2.  6    |             share of publicly funded education is close to 100 for basic
 25    I,     2.  6    |            basic and upper-secondary education. For tertiary education,
 26    I,     2.  6    |              education. For tertiary education, the shares of publicly
 27    I,     2.  6    |            shares of publicly funded education vary somewhat and are generally
 28    I,     2.  6    |             opportunity of life-long education to help all citizens to
 29    I,     2. 10.  1|          services, surveillance, the education of the professions and the
 30    I,     3.  1    |              force participation and education. However, closely related
 31    I,     3.  1    |              rising levels of female education were especially important:
 32    I,     3.  1    |          number of women with higher education explains about half of the
 33    I,     3.  1    |              children. Next to that, education is crucial (Bloom and Trussell,
 34   II,     5.  1.  1|                Whilst a low level of education and/or a manual occupation
 35   II,     5.  1.  2|     epidemiological data and medical education which are promoted by the
 36   II,     5.  1.  2|          nurses, therapeutic patient education and patient associations
 37   II,     5.  1.  3|             1.3. Therapeutic patient education~ ~The WHO produced a document
 38   II,     5.  1.  3|          1998 on therapeutic patient education (Report of a WHO Working
 39   II,     5.  1.  3|         Group on Therapeutic Patient Education. Continuing education programmes
 40   II,     5.  1.  3|        Patient Education. Continuing education programmes for healthcare
 41   II,     5.  1.  3|     adherence.~ ~Therapeutic patient education should enable patients to
 42   II,     5.  1.  3|         illness. Therapeutic patient education has been designed to help
 43   II,     5.  1.  3|         practice therapeutic patient education, hoping therefore to improve
 44   II,     5.  1.  3|            need. Therapeutic patient education is a systemic, patient-centered
 45   II,     5.  1.  3|             providers trained in the education of patients that takes into
 46   II,     5.  1.  3|            care.~Therapeutic patient education is about the patient’s daily
 47   II,     5.  1.  3|       condition. Therapeutic patient education is designed, therefore,
 48   II,     5.  1.  3|         society. Therapeutic patient education is essential for an efficient
 49   II,     5.  1.  3|        benefits. Therapeutic patient education is education managed by
 50   II,     5.  1.  3|     Therapeutic patient education is education managed by health care providers
 51   II,     5.  1.  3|             providers trained in the education of patients, and designed
 52   II,     5.  2.  5|          schools, worksites, sports, education and agricultural to educate
 53   II,     5.  2.  6|        comprehensive information and education to consumers, integrating
 54   II,     5.  2.  7|             the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment
 55   II,     5.  3.  2|      teaching and continuing medical education, existing facilities, clinical
 56   II,     5.  4.  2|            of their own diabetes and education for it~-> Planning, provision
 57   II,     5.  4.  6|              stressful situations.~· Education and self-education are a
 58   II,     5.  4.  6|            care, social services and education services;~· Further development
 59   II,     5.  5.Int|          higher among women of lower education, but that education was
 60   II,     5.  5.Int|            lower education, but that education was not a significant risk
 61   II,     5.  5.  1|           status, employment status, education and rural/urban living and
 62   II,     5.  5.  1|           status, employment status, education, place of residence and
 63   II,     5.  5.  2|                Whilst a low level of education and/or a manual occupation
 64   II,     5.  5.  3|             Furthermore, a Lifestyle Education Programme will be developed
 65   II,     5.  5.  3|               For example, nutrition education programmes as much as school-based
 66   II,     5.  5.  3|             also fund and coordinate education prevention programmes.~Parents
 67   II,     5.  5.  3|            young ages, the time when education is ongoing or the person
 68   II,     5.  5.  3|      Identification, Management, and Education (PRIME) and Recognition
 69   II,     5.  5.  3|        University Press, McGraw-Hill Education.~Kohn R, Saxena S, Levav
 70   II,     5.  5.  3|             that early and intensive education can help children with ASD
 71   II,     5.  5.  3|              health, social care and education and commissioning practitioners;
 72   II,     5.  5.  3|             is no general policy for education and health services for
 73   II,     5.  5.  3|              of awareness and public education are necessary to diminish
 74   II,     5.  5.  3|           complete basic or required education (Sillanpaa, 1992). An international
 75   II,     5.  5.  3|          showed comparable levels of education in patients with epilepsy
 76   II,     5.  5.  3|            no evidence that epilepsy education of teachers has improved.~ ~
 77   II,     5.  5.  3|         Fisher, 2000), intelligence, education, personality, age, psychosocial
 78   II,     5.  5.  3|             control affect patientseducation, employment, driving and
 79   II,     5.  5.  3|        License Committee.~The Public Education Commission of the IBE produced
 80   II,     5.  5.  3|        fundamental role in promoting education on epilepsy towards patients,
 81   II,     5.  5.  3|        characteristics (age, gender, education, disability level) that
 82   II,     5.  5.  3|        fundamental role in promoting education on PD for patients, their
 83   II,     5.  6.  3|             and hypertension; formal education; socio-economic and marital
 84   II,     5.  7.  4|          reasons including access to education and health promotion initiatives
 85   II,     5.  8.  6| effectiveness of current prevention, education, medication and rehabilitation
 86   II,     5.  9. FB|             guidelines requires more education of both patients and doctors
 87   II,     5.  9.  5|         preventive measures, patient education and self-management programmes.
 88   II,     5.  9.  5|             guidelines requires more education of both patients and doctors
 89   II,     5. 11.  2|             the highest standards of education and research into the causes
 90   II,     5. 11.  5| environmental health information and education.~Also relevant in this context
 91   II,     5. 11.  7|             US Department of Health, Education and Welfare, National Center
 92   II,     5. 12.  5|             adequate information and education policies in order to increase
 93   II,     5. 14.  3|            poverty; people with poor education or low socioeconomic status;
 94   II,     5. 14.  3|              dental status, level of education and family income.~ ~The
 95   II,     5. 14.  4|         health management. Nutrition education by dental professionals
 96   II,     5. 14.  5|            providers, and supporting education and prevention activities.
 97   II,     7.  1    |            media and targeted safety education is almost impossible without
 98   II,     7.  4.  4|        pre-school children, physical education at school, organised activities
 99   II,     7.  5    |           legislation, supervision & education.~ ~There is no country in
100   II,     7.  5    |    protection, welfare, research and education. Nevertheless, the health
101   II,     7.  5    |        Justice, Civil Protection and Education) in order to provide appropriate
102   II,     8.  1.  3|       disability status.~ ~Access to education~ ~Participation to education
103   II,     8.  1.  3|         education~ ~Participation to education and training among those
104   II,     8.  1.  3|             reduced participation in education and training is more evident
105   II,     8.  1.  5|           employment, accessibility, education, freedom from exploitation,
106   II,     8.  1.  5|             market. Better access to education and life-long learning,
107   II,     8.  2.  1|            communication, self care, education, work, leisure time and
108   II,     8.  2.  2|            and of rehabilitation and education of the blind constitute
109   II,     8.  2.  2|          need should be assessed for education and awareness campaigns
110   II,     9        |          family income, and maternal education (see above). Data on the
111   II,     9        |              2005). Data on maternal education is more difficult to obtain
112   II,     9        |         normal development and play, education, mental wellbeing, and ultimately
113   II,     9        |            People with low levels of education are more likely to suffer
114   II,     9        |          those with higher levels of education. For example, people with
115   II,     9        |            people with low levels of education have an increased risk of
116   II,     9        |            functional capacity. Poor education, poverty, and harmful living
117   II,     9.  1.  1|             Distribution of motherseducation~F: Distribution of mothers'
118   II,     9.  1.  2|             with respect to level of education in the Netherlands. Community
119   II,     9.  2.  1|      provision of services including education and health services and
120   II,     9.  2.  2|           such as those dealing with Education and Culture, Energy and
121   II,     9.  2.  2|              and children, and early education. More recently the European
122   II,     9.  2.  4|              circumstances, parental education, housing and family income,
123   II,     9.  2.  4|          family income, and maternal education (see above). Data on the
124   II,     9.  2.  4|              2005). Data on maternal education is more difficult to obtain
125   II,     9.  2.  4|         normal development and play, education, mental wellbeing, and ultimately
126   II,     9.  2.  5|            including play areas, and education for those of school age
127   II,     9.  2.  5|     collection, health promotion and education.~ ~In order to strengthen
128   II,     9.  2.  5|           access of Roma children to education.~ ~In 2000, the Commission
129   II,     9.  2.  6|         alleviation, employment, and education are just some of the other
130   II,     9.  2.  6|            hence parental nutrition, education, and health-related behaviour
131   II,     9.  2.  6|             attractive environments, education and the prevention of disease.
132   II,     9.  3.  1|            People with low levels of education are more likely to suffer
133   II,     9.  3.  1|          those with higher levels of education. For example, people with
134   II,     9.  3.  1|            people with low levels of education have an increased risk of
135   II,     9.  3.  2|         parity, smoking and maternal education. The mother’s country of
136   II,     9.  3.  3|    socioeconomic changes in poverty, education and employment. Demographic
137   II,     9.  3.  3|          detailed information on sex education and advice, sexual experiences,
138   II,     9.  3.  3|              in comparison to age or education (Del Amo et al, 2004; Herlitz
139   II,     9.  3.  3|             the school in the sexual education of the young and the association
140   II,     9.  3.  3|       association between school sex education and risk reduction and the
141   II,     9.  3.  3|             having a higher level of education and age of first intercourse (
142   II,     9.  3.  3|            that curriculum-based sex education does not increase risky
143   II,     9.  3.  3|          have shown school-based sex education to lead to improved awareness
144   II,     9.  3.  3|          Attitudes towards sexuality education differ among countries in
145   II,     9.  3.  3|          risk and the role of health education campaigns. Eur J Public
146   II,     9.  3.  3|              WHO) (2006b): Sexuality education in Europe: A reference guide
147   II,     9.  4.  3|          higher among women of lower education, but that education was
148   II,     9.  4.  3|            lower education, but that education was not a significant risk
149   II,     9.  4.  4|            functional capacity. Poor education, poverty, and harmful living
150   II,     9.  4.  5|           Longevity Centre, 2006).~ ~Education and health. In most countries,
151   II,     9.  4.  5|          most countries, the average education of older people is less
152   II,     9.  4.  5|              by these differences in education level, and by subsequent
153   II,     9.  4.  5|              of all ages with higher education levels tend to adopt and
154   II,     9.  5.  3|  advantageous work conditions, lower education and other stresses that
155   II,     9.  5.  3|            peers (WHO/HBSC, 2004).~ ~Education~ ~Numerous studies demonstrate
156   II,     9.  5.  3|          those with higher levels of education.. The prevalence of ill-health
157   II,     9.  5.  3|            gender with low levels of education are more likely to suffer
158   II,     9.  5.  3|          European Commission, 2003). Education is also significantly associated
159   II,     9.  5.  3|              of that country.~ ~Poor education, poverty, bad lifestyle
160   II,     9.  5.  3|            lower average standard of education than that of younger people.
161   II,     9.  5.  3|         younger people. This lack of education will influence the income,
162   II,     9.  5.  3|             at least upper secondary education in 2005: 80% of women compared
163   II,     9.  5.  3|             at least upper secondary education (2003)~ ~Poverty in old
164   II,     9.  5.  3|          smoking, tend to have lower education and employment levels than
165   II,     9.  5.  3|            South Wales Department of Education and Training, 2007).~ ~Girls
166   II,     9.  5.  3|               had the highest rates. Education and retirement explain the
167   II,     9.  5.  4|          A6-0200/2005 : 07/08/2006Education as the cornerstone of the
168   II,     9.  5.  4|            of the most vulnerable to education and information is essential (
169   II,     9.  5.  4|       recognises the central role of education as the foundation for all
170   II,     9.  5.  6|               Experience of Physical Education. In Primary School Physical
171   II,     9.  5.  6|              Primary School Physical Education. (Edited by: A. Williams).
172   II,     9.  5.  6|               Stockholm Institute of Education~ ~Brown H (2003): Women'
173   II,     9.  5.  6|            South Wales Department of Education and Training, Personal Development,
174   II,     9.  5.  6|     Development, Health and Physical Education Unit (PDHPE) (2007): Gender
175   II,     9.  5.  6|          different forms of physical education construct varying masculinities
176   II,     9.  5.  6|            in secondary schools. Sex Education, 3(1), pp. 47-59.~ ~Probyn
177  III,    10.  1    |              as poverty and level of education (EEA, 2005). Important elements
178  III,    10.  1.  3|      nutrition and physical activity education programmes in children.
179  III,    10.  1.  3|  Determinants of health and disease: Education, health promotion, and social
180  III,    10.  2.  1|          difference. Those with less education and of younger age smoke
181  III,    10.  2.  1|          lower educated, whereby the education is an indicator of the socio-economic
182  III,    10.  2.  1|              low tar", and "mild";~· education, communication, training
183  III,    10.  2.  1|          have evaluated school based education which aimed at reducing
184  III,    10.  2.  1|           found that classroom based education is not an effective intervention
185  III,    10.  2.  1|      complemented by outreach health education. Four EU countries also
186  III,    10.  2.  1|          poor living conditions; low education; lack of traditions, beliefs
187  III,    10.  2.  1|             programs for oral health education and services should be created
188  III,    10.  2.  1|    Estabrooks et al, 2003; UK Health Education Authority, 1995). They are
189  III,    10.  2.  1|   environmental conditions, physical education in schools is important
190  III,    10.  2.  1|          that the amount of physical education at school and the way it
191  III,    10.  2.  1|               such as those with the education and sports sectors, and
192  III,    10.  2.  1|              sport, leisure, work or education sectors. It is a task to
193  III,    10.  2.  1|           Sport Science and Physical Education.~ ~Brettschneider WD, Naul
194  III,    10.  2.  1|              sport in the context of education and as a means of restoring
195  III,    10.  2.  1|           SPORT. Directorate General Education and Culture, Brussels.~COM(
196  III,    10.  2.  1|           SPORT. Directorate General Education and Culture, Brussels. SEC(
197  III,    10.  2.  1|     Requested by Directorate General Education and Culture and coordinated
198  III,    10.  2.  1|            28 July 2006)~ ~UK Health Education Authority (1995): Health
199  III,    10.  2.  1|               such as those with the education and sports sectors, and
200  III,    10.  2.  1|         across food services, health education, physical education, play
201  III,    10.  2.  1|           health education, physical education, play and sport, and should
202  III,    10.  2.  1|           deliver an intense dietary education programme using multimedia.
203  III,    10.  2.  1|              principles of nutrition education mostly as~· foods intended
204  III,    10.  2.  1|        comprehensive information and education to consumers (e.g. conduct
205  III,    10.  2.  1|             a review. London, Health Education Authority.~ ~UNECE and WHO
206  III,    10.  3.  4|       analysis and treatment, health education and information to the public,
207  III,    10.  4.  2|               N.A.~ ~N.A.~Labelling, education~ ~Taylor & Lehrer, 1996;~
208  III,    10.  5.  1|            Involvement, Training and Education, Environment, Travel and
209  III,    10.  5.  2|              often without secondary education than urban dwellers (Eurofound,
210  III,    10.  5.  2|            association with parental education and individual living conditions
211  III,    10.  5.  3|          disorders. Employees in the education sector and those engaged
212  III,    10.  5.  3|          next six months. Workers in education, health, hotels and restaurants
213  III,    10.  5.  3|               public administration; education; health and social work;
214  III,    10.  5.  3|              worker training (formal education, vocational training and
215  III,    10.  5.  3|       Health Promotion, Information, Education and Training (part of the
216  III,    10.  6.  2|             society depending on low education, low occupational standing
217  III,    10.  6.  2|           those with lower levels of education, occupational class, or
218  III,    10.  6.  2|              similar to those due to education (Figure 10.6.2.2). These
219  III,    10.  6.  2|            in mortality per level of education in Finland, Norway, Italy,
220  III,    10.  6.  2|         people with higher levels of education have been able to protect
221  III,    10.  6.  2|              conditions per level of education among people aged 25-79,
222  III,    10.  6.  2|            indicated by low level of education, occupational class, income
223  III,    10.  6.  2|            shared work experience.~· Education: The Dutch projectSupervision
224  III,    10.  6.  2|            Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA) has developed a project
225   IV,    11.  1.  3|        ranging social policies (e.g. education leading to cleaner water
226   IV,    11.  1.  5|            encompass the level, mix, education and training of staff, and
227   IV,    11.  1.  5|             through various efforts. Education is one way - through formal
228   IV,    11.  1.  5|           Women, older age and lower education levels tend to be associated
229   IV,    11.  3.  1|         life-long continuing medical education path.~ ~Regardless of the
230   IV,    11.  3.  1|         World Federation for Medical Education. Regulating bodies may require
231   IV,    11.  3.  1|       candidate. Health professionseducation in Europe is tightly regulated
232   IV,    11.  3.  1|      reviewing the workforce supply, education and training, working conditions,
233   IV,    11.  5.  4|             communication.~Continued education should form an essential
234   IV,    11.  6.  5|               2006): Patient safety: education, training and professional
235   IV,    12.  1    |      collection, public information, education, cancer training for health-care
236   IV,    12.  1    |            as health information and education.~The Community shall complement
237   IV,    12.  1    |        Setting minimum standards for education & training. Promoting cross
238   IV,    12.  2    |          schools, worksites, sports, education and agricultural to educate
239   IV,    12.  2    |              and the organization of education for doctors and researchers.~ ~
240   IV,    12.  2    |                low tar", and "mild";~education, communication, training
241   IV,    12.  2    |          have evaluated school based education which aimed to reduce alcohol
242   IV,    12.  2    |           found that classroom based education is not an effective intervention
243   IV,    12.  3    |            adopted on 2 July 2008;~· education and youth including council’
244   IV,    12.  4    |       programmes for all regions~EAC~Education on healthy lifestyles; Lifelong
245   IV,    12.  5    |              on key settings such as education and the workplace, and across
246   IV,    12.  7    |             policy on social Policy, Education, Vocational Training and
247   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Centre for Health Education, see www. ). Socio-Economic
248   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA, www.bzga.de) is providing,
249   IV,    12. 10    |                  school-based health education programs with broad focus (
250   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Centre for Health Education (see www. .~ Alcohol prevention
251   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Centre for Health Education (BzGA, see www. e) and German
252   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA, see www. ), Nationaler
253   IV,    12. 10    |               Women and Adolescents; Education and Research) initiated
254   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Centre for Health Education (BzGA, see www. e) and German
255   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA), (see www. e) aims
256   IV,    12. 10    |             are AIDS prevention, sex education and family planning. It
257   IV,    12. 10    |       provides information about sex education and family planning for
258   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA): ww de Website hosted
259   IV,    12. 10    |        helpful in future times (esp. education, health, work field), strengthening
260   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Centre for Health Education (BzgA)~ ~Work-related health
261   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA) and the German Youth
262   IV,    12. 10    |        opportunities on the basis of education, growing up without violence,
263   IV,    12. 10    |            Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA) publishes information
264   IV,    12. 10    |      publishes information on health education and health promotion for
265   IV,    12. 10    |            European Community Health Education (ECHI)~ ~European cooperation
266   IV,    12. 10    |             Disability Act 2005 ~· **Education for Persons with Special
267   IV,    12. 10    |            an emphasis to the health education of the public especially
268   IV,    12. 10    |            it supports sexual health education programs in the schools,
269   IV,    12. 10    |         Environment, the Ministry of Education and the University of Athens
270   IV,    12. 10    |                 Health promotion and education of hospitals employees~-
271   IV,    12. 10    |     community~- Health promotion and education of hospitalised patients~ ~
272   IV,    12. 10    |       municipality. Vocational basic education should have a minimum population
273   IV,    12. 10    |           housing, consumer affairs, education, culture, social services,
274   IV,    12. 10    |            housing, consumer issues, education culture, social services,
275   IV,    12. 10    |              and medical care policy~Education policy~Agriculture policy~
276   IV,    12. 10    |              policy Transport policy~Education policy~Consumer policy~Youth
277   IV,    12. 10    |              and medical care policy~Education policy~Consumer policy~Youth
278   IV,    12. 10    |              policy~Transport policy~Education policy~Child policy~Consumer
279   IV,    12. 10    |          Justice policy~Youth policy~Education policy~Unprotected sex~ ~
280   IV,    12. 10    |              Domain of objective 8~ ~Education policy~Public health policy~
281   IV,    12. 10    |         objective 8~ ~Justice policy~Education policy~Health and medical
282   IV,    12. 10    |       Preschool environment~Level of education among employees~ ~Domain
283   IV,    12. 10    |              Domain of objective 3~ ~Education policy~Child policy~School
284   IV,    12. 10    |              Domain of objective 3~ ~Education policy~Child policy~Children'
285   IV,    12. 10    |              Domain of objective 3~ ~Education policy~Child policy~ ~Personal
286   IV,    12. 10    |         Healthcare MeasuresHealth education~ProgrammeIncreasing access
287   IV,    12. 10    |         Healthcare MeasuresHealth education~Safety awareness~ Intermediate~
288   IV,    13.  3    |         health care, long-term care, education and unemployment transfers (
289   IV,    13.  6.  1|            school years, the loss of education also has a detrimental effect.
290   IV,    13.  6.  1|              on occasions of special education and social care;~· In extreme
291   IV,    13.  6.  1|           the child of loss of play, education, and socialisation, in terms
292   IV,    13.  7.  2|             population with tertiary education to the number of new patents
293   IV,    13.  8    |    activities ranging from research, education, or awareness raising campaigns
294   IV,    13.  9    |           health and long-term care, education and unemployment benefits
295  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|            eczema~eczemas~edentulous~education~e-health~elder~elderly~e-learning~