Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  5    |           Europe report, published in early October 2003, presented
  2    I,     2.  5    |               employability, reducing early retirement schemes, increasing
  3    I,     2.  6    |               Table 2.3) and of total early school leavers (Figure 2.
  4    I,     2.  6    |    educational systems.~ ~Figure 2.4. Early school leavers in EUGLOREH
  5    I,     2.  9    |         diseases is very dependent on early detection and the preventive
  6    I,     2.  9    |               their ability to detect early and act.~ ~The impact on
  7    I,     2. 10.  1|               preventive medicine and early detection of illnesses.
  8    I,     3.  1    |             European countries in the early 1970s; elsewhere the age
  9    I,     3.  1    |               since the late 1980s or early 1990s. In the 1960s the
 10    I,     3.  1    |          their first child relatively early in many EU-countries, at
 11    I,     3.  1    |          around 10%. This ‘pattern of early childbearing’ is characteristic
 12    I,     3.  2    |             occurred in the 1960s and early 1970s, in Austria and Germany
 13    I,     3.  2    |         Germany in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Portugal experienced
 14   II,     4.  1    |            more in the late 1950s and early 1960s, converged to a level
 15   II,     5.  1.  1|             allow, in some cases, for early detection and diagnosis
 16   II,     5.  1.  1|             cancer, and once detected early by screening via PAP-smear
 17   II,     5.  1.  1|          evidences are not available. Early weaning is reported to be
 18   II,     5.  2.  5|          mortality trends between the early 1980s and 1990s, showed
 19   II,     5.  2.  6|          nutrition and food safety in early life, ensuring a safe, healthy
 20   II,     5.  3.  2|       providing the following data:~- early indicators: screen-detected
 21   II,     5.  3.  4|             cancer, and once detected early by screening via PAP-smear
 22   II,     5.  3.  5|        anticipate incidence detecting early invasive cancers (Parkin
 23   II,     5.  3.  5|           which resulted in increased early detection (incidence) of
 24   II,     5.  3.  7|                               5.3.6.2 Early diagnosis (secondary prevention
 25   II,     5.  3.  7|              The basic approach is an early detection of disease that
 26   II,     5.  3.  7|         prevention of risk factors to early diagnosis, adequate treatment
 27   II,     5.  3.  7|        primary prevention, screening, early diagnosis and treatment,
 28   II,     5.  3.  7|          control factors: prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment
 29   II,     5.  3.  8|          richer countries)~· Focus on early diagnosis: implementing
 30   II,     5.  4.  1|              possibility to ensure an early diagnosis are influenced
 31   II,     5.  4.  2|              prolonged ill health and early death.~It currently (1989)
 32   II,     5.  4.  6|               secondary intervention (early intensive treatment) can
 33   II,     5.  4.  6|        progression of the disease. An early diagnosis and/or active
 34   II,     5.  5.  1|               spells, absenteeism and early retirement and also due
 35   II,     5.  5.  1|              6 years of age(1997-99): Early years of life have a significant
 36   II,     5.  5.  2|         diagnosis and many are in the early stages and have not yet
 37   II,     5.  5.  2|             of developing dementia.~ ~Early diagnosis and appropriate
 38   II,     5.  5.  2|                  Secondary Prevention~Early diagnosis and access to
 39   II,     5.  5.  2|              services, prevention and early diagnosis, awareness campaigns;~·
 40   II,     5.  5.  3|      occupying during adolescence and early adulthood are characterised
 41   II,     5.  5.  3|             Children, adolescents and early adults are a particularly
 42   II,     5.  5.  3|           Gupta, 1995). Therefore, an early diagnosis and the access
 43   II,     5.  5.  3|              disease onset usually in early adulthood. The clinical
 44   II,     5.  5.  3|         long-lasting disorder with an early start, and thus a major
 45   II,     5.  5.  3|               in late adolescence and early adulthood preceded by a
 46   II,     5.  5.  3|             suicide or other forms of early mortality, also need to
 47   II,     5.  5.  3|               issue is represented by early identification and intervention
 48   II,     5.  5.  3|      conservative opinions concerning early detection and intervention
 49   II,     5.  5.  3|           criteria and the benefit of early intervention, especially
 50   II,     5.  5.  3|               around the world, three early programmes have generated
 51   II,     5.  5.  3|               to the establishment of Early Recognition Centres and
 52   II,     5.  5.  3|             field of risk assessment, early detection, first-onset schizophrenia,
 53   II,     5.  5.  3|               guidelines~· to promote early detection and early intervention
 54   II,     5.  5.  3|           promote early detection and early intervention in order to
 55   II,     5.  5.  3|           Person should be Treated as Early as Possible”. Psychiat Prax
 56   II,     5.  5.  3|         Häfner H and Maurer K (2006): Early detection of schizophrenia:
 57   II,     5.  5.  3|            Gaebel W, Wölwer W (2004): Early detection and secondary
 58   II,     5.  5.  3|             Study (EPOS): integrating early recognition and intervention
 59   II,     5.  5.  3|               good language skills in early childhood but gradually
 60   II,     5.  5.  3|             scientific community that early and intensive education
 61   II,     5.  5.  3|               have been developed for early detection and diagnosis
 62   II,     5.  5.  3|          European level, however, the early detection and diagnosis
 63   II,     5.  5.  3|                Levy SR, et al (2001): Early development of intractable
 64   II,     5.  5.  3|             system established in the early 1950s, prevalence in Göteborg
 65   II,     5.  5.  3|               to detect benign and/or early cases; (c) the different
 66   II,     5.  5.  3|            loss due to sick-leave and early retirement), and intangible
 67   II,     5.  5.  3|      Production losses and especially early retirement (indirect costs)
 68   II,     5.  5.  3|               hypothesised to operate early in life. Later influences
 69   II,     5.  5.  3|             main effect, or primed by early exposures and with reciprocal
 70   II,     5.  5.  3|           with diet and sun exposure, early life infections including
 71   II,     5.  5.  3|         lifestyle factors also acting early in life, such as smoking.~ ~
 72   II,     5.  5.  3|          Based on available evidence, early, aggressive treatment is
 73   II,     5.  5.  3|       Identifying benign cases in the early stages of MS is difficult
 74   II,     5.  5.  3|             in scientific literature.~Early published studies on MS
 75   II,     5.  5.  3|               most important of these early studies (Larocca, 1985)
 76   II,     5.  5.  3|         Vukusic S, Adeleine P (2003): Early clinical predictors and
 77   II,     5.  5.  3|     expenditures than patients in the early stages of the disease (Findley
 78   II,     5.  5.  3|         contribute considerably to an early nursing home placement in
 79   II,     5.  5.  3|             Figure 5.5.3.6.3). In the early stages of PD (HY I) average
 80   II,     5.  5.  3|          stages of PD compared to the early stages of the disease. A
 81   II,     5.  5.  3|     Society-European Section. Part I: early (uncomplicated) Parkinson’
 82   II,     5.  5.  3|      Logroscino G (2005): The role of early life environmental risk
 83   II,     5.  6.  1|          limiting work and leading to early retirement or long-term
 84   II,     5.  6.  3|           with up to 60% of people on early retirement or long-term
 85   II,     5.  6.  3|               earliest stage to allow early treatment. Recently, recommendations
 86   II,     5.  6.  3|    recommendations have been made for early diagnosis inclusive of the
 87   II,     5.  6.  3|        reducing long-term disability. Early treatment aimed at controlling
 88   II,     5.  6.  3|           disability in patients with early RA that have been identified
 89   II,     5.  6.  3|               change in patients with early RA that have been identified
 90   II,     5.  6.  3|     disability. The disability starts early and rises in a linear fashion (
 91   II,     5.  6.  3|          long-term disability, whilst early treatment aimed at controlling
 92   II,     5.  6.  6| Recommendations for the Management of Early Arthritis: Report of a Task
 93   II,     5.  6.  6|         Symmons D, Harrison B (2000): Early inflammatory polyarthritis:
 94   II,     5.  7.  1|            health policies. Moreover, early detection can prevent or
 95   II,     5.  7.  5|         programme to detect CKD in an early phase was presented to a
 96   II,     5.  7.  5|            effects of their diseases. Early figures indicate that in
 97   II,     5.  7.  5|              of kidney disease in its early stages.~· The Ministry of
 98   II,     5.  8.  5|             which could be easily and early diagnosed via spirometry.
 99   II,     5.  8.  5|              a promising approach for early detection of COPD in high
100   II,     5.  8.  5|               smokers, can reveal the early presence of AL in a large
101   II,     5.  8.  7|                Zetterstrom O. (2004): Early detection of COPD in primary
102   II,     5.  9. FB|              symptoms of atopy appear early in life, persist over years
103   II,     5.  9. FB|          ensure regular follow-up. An early and accurate diagnosis is
104   II,     5.  9. FB|            asthma was observed in the early 1990s among populations
105   II,     5.  9. FB|              would have to be applied early in life, most probably in
106   II,     5.  9. FB|             in life, most probably in early infancy. Unfortunately,
107   II,     5.  9. FB|               wheezing in infancy and early childhood and the risk of
108   II,     5.  9. FB|            responses to food proteins early in life.~ ~Since children
109   II,     5.  9. FB|               individuals to begin an early treatment. In Europe,,allergic
110   II,     5.  9.  2|              at the end of 2005.~ ~In early 1990s two large studies
111   II,     5.  9.  3|             several reports since the early 60s. The review by von Hertzen
112   II,     5.  9.  4|            with cats and dogs, during early infancy. The protective
113   II,     5.  9.  4|           animals and other children; early exposure to certain bacteria
114   II,     5.  9.  6|              of wheezing illnesses in early childhood. GINA is a partner
115   II,     5.  9.  7|        Pistorio A, Rossi GA. (2005): “Earlycat ownership and teh risk
116   II,     5. 11.  3|              cases develops during in early childhood. It is typically
117   II,     5. 11.  3|         classes and usually begins in early adulthood. Heredity is strongly
118   II,     5. 11.  3|           been taking place since the early 1980s. Mortality rates have
119   II,     5. 11.  3|          catching established disease early) in others. Although melanoma
120   II,     5. 11.  3|         curable when recognised at an early stage, availability of facilities
121   II,     5. 11.  3|         facilities for detecting such early cases varies widely within
122   II,     5. 11.  5|           skin disease is still at an early stage, even though the knowledge
123   II,     5. 11.  5|              and to seek advice at an early stage could already have
124   II,     5. 12.  3|              the highest rates in the early 1980s were in Southern and
125   II,     5. 12.  3|           Southern Europe, and in the early 2000s France, Italy and
126   II,     5. 12.  3|              10-13/100,000 men in the early 1980s and around 5/100,000
127   II,     5. 12.  3|               Slovakia), which in the early 2000s had extremely high
128   II,     5. 13    |              often adopted during the early years of life. Childhood
129   II,     5. 13    |             to address the problem is early in life. Moreover, a systematic
130   II,     5. 15.  2|          started to be written in the early 1960s on the basis of published
131   II,     5. 15.  5|         Collaboration may include the early research and development
132   II,     6.Acr    |           Prevention and Control~EWRS~Early Warning and Response System~
133   II,     6.  3.  3|        incidence was very high in the early 1990s (over 60 cases per
134   II,     6.  3.  4|               offered annually in the early autumn for three major risk
135   II,     6.  3.  4|         during acute febrile periods, early isolation of symptomatic
136   II,     6.  3.  4|            result in failure of cure, early relapse or the development
137   II,     6.  3.  4|        resistance, above).~ ~ ~In the early90s, a number of EU countries
138   II,     6.  3.  5|               registered in the EU in early 2001, and 12 European countries
139   II,     6.  4.  1|           provide information for the early detection of potential outbreaks,
140   II,     6.  4.  2|                                6.4.2. Early warning~ ~The second pillar
141   II,     6.  4.  2|           pillar of the network is an early warning and response system (
142   II,     6.  4.  2|        Commission has put in place an early warning and response system (
143   II,     6.  4.  3|                outbreak management;~· early notification of cases;~·
144   II,     6.  4.  4|              disease surveillance and early warning systems. By working
145   II,     6.  4.  4|          running the operation of the Early Warning and Response System
146   II,     8.  2.  1|             present from birth or the early developmental period and
147   II,     8.  2.  1|         successful when they get help early in life. Fetal alcohol syndrome
148   II,     8.  2.  1|           taken before conception and early in pregnancy can help prevent
149   II,     8.  2.  1|                cannot be treated, and early recognition can serve only
150   II,     9        |            diagnosis is often made in early childhood rather than the
151   II,     9        |           such as a drug taken during early pregnancy). Congenital anomalies
152   II,     9        |        therapeutic drugs taken during early pregnancy. A number of drugs
153   II,     9        |         people, often beginning at an early age. Weekly drinking is
154   II,     9        |              cervical cancer, such as early sexual activity, sexually
155   II,     9        |              body mass index (BMI) in early adulthood (Michels et al,
156   II,     9.  1.  1|               by timing of death into early neonatal deaths (at 0-6
157   II,     9.  1.  1|            neonatal mortality rate at early gestations must be combined
158   II,     9.  1.  1|             since it is possible that early neonatal deaths may be recorded
159   II,     9.  1.  2|               with a heart murmur for early echography. Severe heart
160   II,     9.  1.  2|            diagnosis is often made in early childhood rather than the
161   II,     9.  1.  2|           such as a drug taken during early pregnancy). Congenital anomalies
162   II,     9.  1.  2|        therapeutic drugs taken during early pregnancy. A number of drugs
163   II,     9.  1.  2|           factors needs to start very early or even before pregnancy.~ ~
164   II,     9.  2.  1|             of care, in that in their early years children are totally
165   II,     9.  2.  2|              design and children, and early education. More recently
166   II,     9.  2.  2|               14 years (from birth to early secondary school age), an
167   II,     9.  2.  3|           rose from around 10% in the early 1980s to around 20% by the
168   II,     9.  2.  4|         people, often beginning at an early age. Weekly drinking is
169   II,     9.  2.  4|              cervical cancer, such as early sexual activity, sexually
170   II,     9.  2.  7|               Structures: Multi-State Early Life Tables Using FFS Data.
171   II,     9.  3.  1|         smaller than at birth. During early childhood, there are closer
172   II,     9.  3.  1|              specific health risks in early and middle age (i.e. testicular
173   II,     9.  3.  1|              as a sentinel marker for early stages of cardio-vascular
174   II,     9.  3.  1|               98% cure rate if caught early enough.~ ~On the other hand,
175   II,     9.  3.  1|           leading to a very effective early warning system for coronary
176   II,     9.  3.  1|              body mass index (BMI) in early adulthood (Michels et al,
177   II,     9.  3.  2|             in European statistics is early obstetrical death, both
178   II,     9.  3.  2|            100 000 live births in the early 1980s to 7 deaths per 100
179   II,     9.  3.  2|             the year 2000 than in the early 1990s. Improved quality
180   II,     9.  3.  2|               published expectedly in early 2009.~ ~ ~
181   II,     9.  3.  2|             regular home visits after early discharge. To assess the
182   II,     9.  3.  3|          sexual initiation later than early school-leavers (Bozon and
183   II,     9.  3.  3|            between the proportions of early school-leavers and graduates
184   II,     9.  3.  3|             to the levels seen in the early 1980s. Also in the Czech Republic,
185   II,     9.  3.  3|          Sexual behaviour in Britain: early heterosexual experience.
186   II,     9.  5.  3|              body mass index (BMI) in early adulthood (Michels, 2006)~ ~
187  III,    10.  1    |           topic of 'Late responses to early exposure' needs to be addressed,
188  III,    10.  1.  1|           alcohol consumption include early drinking experiences, expectations
189  III,    10.  1.  1|               In late adolescence and early adulthood, however, peer
190  III,    10.  2.  1|               of 65. In the EU, these early deaths account for one third
191  III,    10.  2.  1|               injuries, pregnancy and early childhood complications.
192  III,    10.  2.  1|              10 years, more so in the early part of this period.~ ~Acute
193  III,    10.  2.  1|               nightclubs and bars5.~ ~Early drug use~ ~Use of illicit
194  III,    10.  2.  1|            illicit drugs can begin as early as in school age. According
195  III,    10.  2.  1|           levels and following a very early start in the life of young
196  III,    10.  2.  1|            also for what concerns the early diagnosis of diseases.~ ~
197  III,    10.  2.  1|           that plaque control at this early age is often not particularly
198  III,    10.  2.  1|            also for what concerns the early diagnosis of diseases. The
199  III,    10.  2.  1|          close the oral health gap in early childhood between advantaged
200  III,    10.  2.  1|             that will be presented in early autumn 2008. This action
201  III,    10.  2.  1|              often adopted during the early years of life. Childhood
202  III,    10.  2.  1|             to address the problem is early in life. Moreover, a systematic
203  III,    10.  2.  1|              during a short period of early life. Therefore, healthy
204  III,    10.  2.  1|           Tracking of overweight from early childhood to adolescence
205  III,    10.  2.  4|               preventive medicine and early detection of illnesses due
206  III,    10.  2.  4|            cohort studies starting as early as possible in life and
207  III,    10.  2.  5|             health. Identification of early developmental factors offers
208  III,    10.  2.  5|        already during foetal life and early infancy.~ ~Environmental
209  III,    10.  2.  5|            significant (Seckl, 2008). Early life environmental events
210  III,    10.  2.  5|               of foetal nutrition and early psychological attachment
211  III,    10.  2.  5|     indicators on foetal nutrition or early attachment.~Neither the
212  III,    10.  2.  5|               section.~ ~The European Early Promotion Project (EEPP)
213  III,    10.  2.  5|             developing and evaluating early mother and child interaction
214  III,    10.  2.  5|          comparative European data on early mother-child interaction.~ ~
215  III,    10.  2.  5|               and childhood. Infant's early relationship with the caregiver(
216  III,    10.  2.  5|      multitude of research has linked early attachment problems with
217  III,    10.  2.  5|              et al, 2003).~ ~However, early psychological development
218  III,    10.  2.  5|            linked to physical health. Early developmental experiences
219  III,    10.  2.  5|            interactions with friends. Early attachment problems.~ ~A
220  III,    10.  2.  5|               role of exposure during early life stages for later development
221  III,    10.  2.  5|          exposure to chemicals during early fetal development can cause
222  III,    10.  2.  5|               environmental exposures early in life. Unfortunately human
223  III,    10.  2.  5|       mutagenic mode of action during early life increases the susceptibility
224  III,    10.  2.  5|          mutagenesis is not involved. Early life exposure to substances
225  III,    10.  2.  5|              the foetal period or the early years of life which is indicated
226  III,    10.  2.  5|               environmental exposures early in life, probably via the
227  III,    10.  2.  5|         health supports the notion of early intervention to promote
228  III,    10.  2.  5|    interventions during pregnancy and early childhood. Interventions
229  III,    10.  2.  5|           interventions to support an early and nurturing interaction
230  III,    10.  2.  5|           been implemented to support early interaction between mother
231  III,    10.  2.  5|            from a Dutch birth cohort. Early human development 2003;75:
232  III,    10.  2.  5|             Day C (2002) The European Early Promotion Project: A new
233  III,    10.  3.  2|               role of exposure during early life stages for a later
234  III,    10.  3.  2|          Exposure to chemicals during early foetal development can cause
235  III,    10.  3.  2|               environmental exposures early in life. Unfortunately,
236  III,    10.  3.  2|       mutagenic mode of action during early life increases the susceptibility
237  III,    10.  3.  2|          mutagenesis is not involved. Early life exposure to substances
238  III,    10.  3.  2|              the foetal period or the early years of life, as indicated
239  III,    10.  3.  2|               environmental exposures early in life, probably via the
240  III,    10.  3.  4|           Identifying potential risks early enough and responding in
241  III,    10.  3.  4|    maintenance of riverways, improved early warning and flood forecasting
242  III,    10.  4.  1|         events during foetal life and early childhood. There is growing
243  III,    10.  4.  2|    development of Regional and Global Early Warning Systems for major
244  III,    10.  4.  2|             by~measures; estimate for~early 1990s: effect in~several
245  III,    10.  4.  2|       dioxins-like PCB were set as an early warning tool of elevated
246  III,    10.  4.  2|              adoption by the Panel in early 2008.~ ~EFSA organises scientific
247  III,    10.  4.  2|               is characterized by the early detection of facts related
248  III,    10.  4.  3|      resistance, is another important early warning signal to take into
249  III,    10.  4.  5|           rectify this are only at an early stage of development (EEA,
250  III,    10.  5.  3|          Working Conditions since the early nineties. The fourth and
251  III,    10.  5.  3|            related absence from work, early retirement and costs from
252  III,    10.  5.  3|    absenteeism, long-term sick leave, early retirement and disability
253  III,    10.  5.  3|       combination of high prevalence, early onset and possibly unfavourable
254  III,    10.  6.  2|             across the life course as early as not being breast fed.
255  III,    10.  6.  2|          order to increase the use of early detection measures (U) in
256  III,    10.  6.  2|        awareness on the importance of early detection and on the services
257   IV,    11.  1.  5|             continuity and prevention/early detection. Also integral
258   IV,    11.  1.  5|              states in the US), while early evidence from the US, Denmark
259   IV,    11.  1.  5|       response and the recognition of early warning signs also play
260   IV,    11.  1.  5|              rapid response system to early signs of declining patient
261   IV,    11.  2.  2|            identify individuals at an early stage of the disease, when
262   IV,    11.  4    |             antibody (Trastuzumab) in early HER2-positive breast cancer~·
263   IV,    11.  4    |              acute inpatient care and early rehabilitation in stroke~·
264   IV,    11.  6.  3|             in progressiveness in the early 1990s (Klavus and Hakkinen,
265   IV,    12.  1    |              for health-care workers, early detection and systematic
266   IV,    12.  2    |          control factors: prevention, early detection, diagnosis, treatment
267   IV,    12.  2    |           life. The basic approach is early detection of disease that
268   IV,    12.  2    |              or other determinants to early diagnosis, adequate treatment
269   IV,    12.  2    |               secondary intervention (early intensive treatment) can
270   IV,    12.  2    |               modify the progression. Early diagnosis and/or active
271   IV,    12.  2    |               a high risk state in an early stage, in order to reduce
272   IV,    12.  4    |             Access: 20.02.08~ ~In the early nineties, the European Commission
273   IV,    12.  5    |        adopted a “common position” in early 2007, and the Programme
274   IV,    12.  5    |           assessment by promoting the early identification of risks;
275   IV,    12.  6    |               the Forum already at an early stage of the policy process.
276   IV,    12. 10    |               side provided by BzGA)~“Early Intervention Of First Time
277   IV,    12. 10    |               States have implemented early warning systems (e. g. on
278   IV,    12. 10    |     Deprivation factors~High priority~Early Assistance for parents and
279   IV,    12. 10    |               The National Centre for early aid/intervention (“Nationales
280   IV,    12. 10    |               Epidemiology and health early warning’’ (ESA AO/1-4914/
281   IV,    12. 10    |          crisis including prevention, early warning, and crisis management.
282   IV,    12. 10    |       demonstrate a European outbreak early warning system that will
283   IV,    12. 10    |       industry. An end-to-end case of early warning at the onset of
284   IV,    12. 10    |    adolescents, especially as regards early interventions for families
285   IV,    12. 10    |             and medical care policy~ ~Early abortions~Percentage distribution
286   IV,    13.Acr    |            identify individuals at an early stage of a disease when
287   IV,    13.  6.  2|          disadvantaged, and makes the early detection and response to
288   IV,    13.  7.  2|            capital investments in the early life of a company are three