Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  1        |             access for all to quality healthcare and long-term care and promote
  2    I,     2.  2        |  professionals from different fields (healthcare, engineering, planning,
  3    I,     2.  3        |     additional training necessary for healthcare personnel in order to make
  4    I,     2.  3        |          movement may also reduce the healthcare workforce in their countries
  5    I,     2.  4        |             introduction of effective healthcare interventions (e.g. hypertension
  6    I,     2.  4        |             social, public health and healthcare institutions; and a rise
  7    I,     2.  4        |         higher poverty rates.~ ~While healthcare systems have contributed
  8    I,     2.  4        |              across the EU, access to healthcare remains uneven across social
  9    I,     2.  4        |         reducing the existing gaps in healthcare provision (Joint Report
 10    I,     2.  5        |           specific sectors, namely in healthcare, agriculture, construction
 11    I,     2.  7        |              the provision of primary healthcare is considered one of the
 12    I,     2.  7        |         underserved for what concerns healthcare services (Marrone, 2007;
 13    I,     2. 10.  1    |         fundamental challenges in the healthcare delivery systems. Medicine
 14    I,     2. 10.  1    |         population.~ ~A comprehensive healthcare which regards, besides environmental,
 15    I,     2. 10.  1    |             The upcoming post-genomic healthcare system also challenges the
 16    I,     2. 10.  1    |               of individualisation in healthcare systems. Indicators and
 17    I,     2. 10.  1    |               genomic profile.~So far healthcare systems, policy makers and
 18    I,     2. 10.  4    |              costs and increasing the healthcare supply chain efficiency
 19    I,     2. 10.  4    |            the fault of an individual Healthcare professional, but rather
 20    I,     2. 10.  4    |              failure of a complicated Healthcare system and can occur anywhere
 21    I,     2. 10.  4    |  identification throughout the entire Healthcare supply chain, right to the
 22    I,     2. 10.  4    |               Chelsea and Westminster Healthcare NHS Trust, UK, introduced
 23    I,     2. 10.  4(12)|                Celsea an Westmenister Healthcare NHS Trust, K. Robertson
 24    I,     2. 10.  4    |    counterfeiters to intrude into the Healthcare supply chain, or at least
 25    I,     2. 10.  4    |          costs along supply chains in healthcare constitute roughly 30 to
 26    I,     2. 10.  4    |       constitute roughly 30 to 40% of healthcare costs but only 6-8% in the
 27    I,     2. 10.  4    |     technologies is higher with other healthcare supply chain stakeholders.
 28    I,     2. 10.  4    |         enable the realisation of all Healthcare and economic benefits related
 29    I,     2. 10.  4    |            access to other markets.~ ~Healthcare is by nature a global sector,
 30    I,     2. 10.  4    |               the stakeholders in the healthcare supply chain will increase
 31    I,     2. 10.  4    |         account the specific needs of healthcare.~ ~The Expert Group on Safe
 32    I,     2. 10.  4(20)|               San Raffaele at the GS1 Healthcare Confererence 13-15 June
 33    I,     2. 10.  4    |           standardised information in healthcare: “The case for coding is
 34    I,     2. 10.  4    |             be adopted throughout the Healthcare system in England, both
 35    I,     2. 10.  4    |            coding systems used within healthcare settings, such as patient
 36    I,     2. 11        |           Social inclusion, pensions, healthcare and long-term care. [on-liine
 37   II,     4.  1        |             counteract the demands on healthcare as a result of population
 38   II,     5.  1.  2    |              the family, friends, and healthcare providers. The complexity
 39   II,     5.  1.  3    |              education programmes for healthcare providers in the field of
 40   II,     5.  1.  4    |               appropriate are:~ ~· In healthcare, as the patient needs information
 41   II,     5.  2.  5    |               health and in accessing healthcare. The existence of a strategic
 42   II,     5.  3.  7    |         within countries in different healthcare settings, which are often
 43   II,     5.  4.  1    |               percentage of the total healthcare expenditures ranged from
 44   II,     5.  4.  6    |   comprehensive diabetes training for healthcare professionals.~ ~To the
 45   II,     5.  4.  6    |           inequalities and optimising healthcare resources;~· Facilitating
 46   II,     5.  4.  6    |      sustainable development of their healthcare systemsNovember 14th ,
 47   II,     5.  5.Int    |             staggering burden, mental healthcare services are often inadequate,
 48   II,     5.  5.Int    |          severe mental illness, NGOs, Healthcare professionals and Government
 49   II,     5.  5.  1    |    under-recognition of depression by healthcare professionals (Lecrubier,
 50   II,     5.  5.  1    |            life, use of treatment and healthcare services. The survey data
 51   II,     5.  5.  2    |           within the framework of the healthcare system and/or through social
 52   II,     5.  5.  2    |          prospect of higher costs for healthcare, it is likely that new systems
 53   II,     5.  5.  3    |           differences in the national healthcare systems. Hence, the broad
 54   II,     5.  5.  3    |              Figure 5.5.3.2.7. Direct healthcare costs by brain disorder~
 55   II,     5.  5.  3    |            teachers, and professional healthcare workers is essential to
 56   II,     5.  5.  3    |             2005, total direct costs (healthcare costs [inpatient care, outpatient
 57   II,     5.  5.  3    |             disease are important for healthcare planning: patients in advanced
 58   II,     5.  5.  3    |             stages of PD cause higher healthcare expenditures than patients
 59   II,     5.  5.  3    |               cost outside the formal healthcare was the single most dominant
 60   II,     5.  5.  3    |             of the total cost. Direct healthcare cost totalled to €4.6 billion.
 61   II,     5.  5.  3    |               the largest part of the healthcare cost, estimated at €1.9
 62   II,     5.  5.  3    |              found outside the formal healthcare sector. Disability due to
 63   II,     5.  5.  3    |              high national income and healthcare expenditure per capita.
 64   II,     5.  5.  3    |            countries is the access to healthcare. Many PD patients are unaware
 65   II,     5.  6.  2    |    musculoskeletal conditions for the healthcare practitioner and policy
 66   II,     5.  6.  3    |        osteoporosis and arthritis the healthcare costs only represent between
 67   II,     5.  6.  4    |               retardation to generate healthcare costs in the Netherlands (
 68   II,     5.  6.  6    |     physiotherapy services in primary healthcare. Physiother Res Int 4:161-
 69   II,     5.  6.  6    |       epidemiological determinants of healthcare costs in Netherlands: cost
 70   II,     5.  6.  6    |              82~Woolf AD (2007): What healthcare services do people with
 71   II,     5.  7.  1    |              A considerable amount of healthcare funding in Europe is spent
 72   II,     5.  7.  5    |             renal IT systems. The NHS Healthcare Commission monitors quality
 73   II,     5.  9.  1    |          developing an asthma-related healthcare policy.~ ~
 74   II,     5.  9.  6    |               issue for the search of healthcare intervention and the choice
 75   II,     5. 11.  2    |            dedicated to improving the healthcare needs of dermatology patients
 76   II,     5. 11.  3    |              not always recognised by healthcare professionals as a serious
 77   II,     5. 14.  8    |             5159.~Wid A (2004): Oral healthcare systems in the extended
 78   II,     6.  3.  2    |          community, but even worse in healthcare settings. Hospitals, especially
 79   II,     6.  3.  4    |             risk groups (the elderly, healthcare workers and those with chronic
 80   II,     6.  3.  4    |              hygiene, mask-wearing in healthcare settings during acute febrile
 81   II,     6.  3.  6    |              patients who do not seek healthcare for their symptoms of gastroenteritis.
 82   II,     7.  1        |         accordingly higher savings in healthcare and welfare costs can be
 83   II,     7.  3.  3    |               EU, causing billions of healthcare costs (Figure 7.5).~ ~Figure
 84   II,     7.  3.  3    |       hospital admission policies and healthcare systems. The average hospital
 85   II,     7.  4        |          major cause of morbidity and healthcare costs: On average, in all
 86   II,     7.  4.  4    |            cuff, often result in high healthcare costs.~Sports activities
 87   II,     9.  1        |               Approaches to perinatal healthcare differ greatly throughout
 88   II,     9.  1.  1    |         section on maternal health.~ ~HealthCare~ ~Healthcare of mothers
 89   II,     9.  1.  1    |       maternal health.~ ~HealthCare~ ~Healthcare of mothers and their conceived
 90   II,     9.  1.  2    |        screening also presents to the healthcare system significant challenges
 91   II,     9.  2.  1    |            enhanced risk for lifetime healthcare problems such as obesity,
 92   II,     9.  2.  3    |           integrated into the overall healthcare system in order to close
 93   II,     9.  2.  5    |         determinants in Chapter 10.~ ~Healthcare and services~ ~Obviously,
 94   II,     9.  2.  5    |            many aspects of health and healthcare, there seems to be scope
 95   II,     9.  2.  5    |              skills necessary for the healthcare of children, and the minimum
 96   II,     9.  2.  5    |             for the implementation of healthcare in their respective countries.
 97   II,     9.  2.  6    |             for the implementation of healthcare in their respective countries.
 98   II,     9.  3.  1    |               s life when the primary healthcare provider should assess a
 99   II,     9.  3.  1    |              and the criteria used by healthcare professionals in making
100   II,     9.  3.  1    |             to seek specialist mental healthcare and are the principal users
101   II,     9.  3.  1    |               places a huge burden on healthcare resources. More data on
102   II,     9.  3.  1    |        diabetes (3.7%) and the lowest healthcare diabetes costs (2.5% of
103   II,     9.  3.  1    |         diabetes costs (2.5% of total healthcare budget) among all EU Member
104   II,     9.  3.  2    |             indicators for monitoring healthcare provided to pregnant women
105   II,     9.  3.  2    |       European level. Descriptions of healthcare services must measure interventions
106   II,     9.  3.  2    |           also incorporate aspects of healthcare quality, as assessed by
107   II,     9.  3.  2    |          sharing their experiences in healthcare provision. There is a large
108   II,     9.  3.  2    |      variability in the approaches to healthcare and these may have an effect
109   II,     9.  3.  2    |            similarly across different healthcare systems. Many indicators
110   II,     9.  3.  2    |              and poor use of valuable healthcare resources.~ ~ ~
111   II,     9.  4.  1    |    demographic changes will challenge healthcare systems and the society
112   II,     9.  4.  1    |             an integrated approach to healthcare is delivered to all citizens
113   II,     9.  4.  1    |             of the national policy on healthcare and care for older people
114   II,     9.  4.  1    |             clinical practice. Public healthcare policy must address individual
115   II,     9.  4.  5    |               quality and sustainable healthcare as one of the key issues
116   II,     9.  4.  5    |          orientations in the field of healthcare and care for the elderly.
117   II,     9.  4.  5    |          Communication concluded that healthcare and long-term care systems
118   II,     9.  4.  5    |         initial orientation report on healthcare and care for the elderly
119   II,     9.  4.  5    |          strategies for the future of healthcare and care for the elderly
120   II,     9.  4.  5    |               looking at policies for healthcare and long-term care for the
121   II,     9.  4.  5    |               interface between their healthcare and the emerging long-term
122   II,     9.  4.  5    |               better co-ordination of healthcare provisions and long-term
123   II,     9.  4.  5    |              the same way as men. The healthcare system has an important
124   II,     9.  4.  5    |             and have better access to healthcare and health information (
125   II,     9.  4.  6    |           living, the availability of healthcare intervention and innovations
126   II,     9.  5.  1    |            women have lower access to healthcare and encounter high risk
127   II,     9.  5.  1    |            treated within the various healthcare systems in Europe stem from
128   II,     9.  5.  3    |             to seek specialist mental healthcare, and are the main users
129   II,     9.  5.  3    |              serious implications for healthcare systems, as it is currently
130   II,     9.  5.  5    |             health status in terms of healthcare resources and national economic
131  III,    10.  2.  1    |              of oral hygiene and oral healthcare products appears to have
132  III,    10.  2.  4    |         fundamental challenges in the healthcare delivery systems. Medicine
133  III,    10.  5.  2    |           coherent with the fact that healthcare practitioners in rural areas
134  III,    10.  5.  2    |               different approaches to healthcare provision may be required
135  III,    10.  5.  2    |           Medical Association (2005): Healthcare in a rural setting. BMA
136  III,    10.  5.  2    |               2004): Rural Health and Healthcare: a North West perspective.
137  III,    10.  5.  3    |               of which 62% was due to healthcare (€105 billion), 21% to productivity
138   IV,    11.Acr        |            HOPE~European Hospital and Healthcare Federation~HPV~Human Papilloma
139   IV,    11.  1.  3    |        average, public expenditure on healthcare per capita increased by
140   IV,    11.  1.  3    |            than US$1000 per capita on healthcare, the majority of other European
141   IV,    11.  1.  3    |             expenditure ($US 2004) on healthcare per capita (1990-2004)~ ~
142   IV,    11.  1.  4    |                   11.1.3.2. Access to healthcare~ ~European governments are
143   IV,    11.  1.  5    |              mid-1960s the quality of healthcare has been measured in terms
144   IV,    11.  1.  5    |              public accountability of healthcare organizations, professionals
145   IV,    11.  1.  5    |           Project to track quality of healthcare across countries. The long-term
146   IV,    11.  1.  5    |      objective is to develop a set of healthcare quality indicators that
147   IV,    11.  1.  5    |              of paying for quality in healthcare (Rosenthal and Frank, 2006).
148   IV,    11.  1.  5    |           interventions for improving healthcare quality (Rosenthal et al,
149   IV,    11.  1.  5    |              protocols are available, healthcare professionals have been
150   IV,    11.  1.  5    |          technical incompetence among healthcare professionals, but medical
151   IV,    11.  1.  5    |               and the finances of the healthcare system, as they lead to
152   IV,    11.  1.  5    |              public satisfaction with healthcare is measured through population
153   IV,    11.  1.  5    |              satisfaction towards the healthcare system as a whole.~ ~Figure
154   IV,    11.  1.  6    |               The methods used to pay healthcare providers create powerful
155   IV,    11.  1.  6    |             the price and quantity of healthcare. In the health service,
156   IV,    11.  1.  6    |                 European Hospital and Healthcare Federation, 2006; Schreyogg
157   IV,    11.  1.  6    |                 European Hospital and Healthcare Federation 2006). With many
158   IV,    11.  1.  6    |                 European Hospital and Healthcare Federation, 2006).~ ~The
159   IV,    11.  1.  6    |                 European Hospital and Healthcare Federation, 2006). In England
160   IV,    11.  1.  6    |  Administrative costs reflect part of healthcare funding that is not directly
161   IV,    11.  1.  6    |               efficiency in which the healthcare system operates. OECD country
162   IV,    11.  1.  6    |       countries that have embarked on healthcare financing reforms, the separation
163   IV,    11.  2.  1    |           association between primary healthcare and improved health outcomes (
164   IV,    11.  3        |               Accessible high quality healthcare depends on a multitude of
165   IV,    11.  3.  1    |             and challenges facing the healthcare workforce in nine countries -
166   IV,    11.  3.  2    |              Additionally, while most healthcare in the EU is publicly funded,
167   IV,    11.  3.  2    |           status, causes of death and healthcare spend, they have little
168   IV,    11.  4        |             inform the development of healthcare policies of given health
169   IV,    11.  4        |              Technology assessment in healthcare is defined as a multidisciplinary
170   IV,    11.  4        |        information from population or healthcare registers, surveys, epidemiologic
171   IV,    11.  5.  1    |          transplantation is a complex healthcare process requiring active
172   IV,    11.  5.  1    |             active participation from healthcare professionals, stakeholders
173   IV,    11.  5.  4    |            training and employment of healthcare professionals responsible
174   IV,    11.  5.  5    |         facilitate cross-talk between healthcare professionals and politics
175   IV,    11.  5.  5    |               also set up transparent healthcare processes, expand these
176   IV,    11.  5.  5    |               the transplant process: healthcare professionals, stakeholders~
177   IV,    11.  6        |                       11.6. Financing healthcare~ ~This section reviews the
178   IV,    11.  6        |             reviews the ways in which healthcare is financed, including levels
179   IV,    11.  6.  1    |          supply of public revenue for healthcare. Countries are faced with
180   IV,    11.  6.  1    |            proportion of GDP spent on healthcare (OECD Health data 2007).
181   IV,    11.  6.  1    |              to be a stabilization of healthcare spending growth in many
182   IV,    11.  6.  1    |            proportion of GDP spent on healthcare. In Finland, healthcare
183   IV,    11.  6.  1    |               healthcare. In Finland, healthcare expenditure growth slowed
184   IV,    11.  6.  1    |               the continued growth in healthcare expenditure across Europe
185   IV,    11.  6.  1    |               government) that impact healthcare expenditure. The process
186   IV,    11.  6.  1    |               significant role in the healthcare investment growth seen in
187   IV,    11.  6.  1    |             associated with measuring healthcare expenditure and drawing
188   IV,    11.  6.  2    |              relatively minor role in healthcare financing in Europe, although
189   IV,    11.  6.  2    |     expenditure, 1990-2005~ ~European healthcare systems rely on a mix of
190   IV,    11.  6.  2    |    contribution mechanisms to finance healthcare with the majority providing
191   IV,    11.  6.  2    |               Italy, or earmarked for healthcare, as in France. General taxation
192   IV,    11.  6.  2    |             allows trade-offs between healthcare and other sectors, but allocation
193   IV,    11.  6.  2    |            sectors, but allocation to healthcare is subject to public spending
194   IV,    11.  6.  2    |              may be limited access to healthcare for the non-employed population.~ ~
195   IV,    11.  6.  2    |              and more consumer-driven healthcare. In the first year of the
196   IV,    11.  6.  2    |           insurance~ ~The majority of healthcare spending in the EU derives
197   IV,    11.  6.  2    |           contribute significantly to healthcare expenditure despite some
198   IV,    11.  6.  2    |            information asymmetries in healthcare present a major obstacle
199   IV,    11.  6.  2    |                1998). Furthermore, as healthcare spending is primarily driven
200   IV,    11.  6.  2    |       substantial proportion of total healthcare expenditure in many European
201   IV,    11.  6.  2    |          shift away from guaranteeing healthcare free at the point of use
202   IV,    11.  6.  3    |           However, public spending on healthcare may be difficult to separate
203   IV,    11.  6.  3    |            redistributive effect of a healthcare system in order to account
204   IV,    11.  6.  3    |         progressiveness. One study of healthcare financing in OECD countries
205   IV,    11.  6.  3    |        reduces the progressiveness of healthcare finance. The share of value
206   IV,    11.  6.  3    |               are equally entitled to healthcare services, regardless of
207   IV,    11.  6.  3    |     comparisons of progressiveness in healthcare funding reveal that healthcare
208   IV,    11.  6.  3    |        healthcare funding reveal that healthcare systems that are largely
209   IV,    11.  6.  3    |               opposed to the need for healthcare, in contrast with public
210   IV,    11.  6.  3    |    alternative measure of fairness of healthcare financing. This formula
211   IV,    11.  6.  3    |             is based on the goal that healthcare payments should not be linked
212   IV,    11.  6.  3    |        between the ability to pay and healthcare payments. Thus, a fair system
213   IV,    11.  6.  4    |               accumulation of prepaid healthcare revenues for a given population.
214   IV,    11.  6.  4    |          ensuring equity of access to healthcare and equality and efficiency
215   IV,    11.  6.  4    |            equality and efficiency in healthcare delivery. Matching healthcare
216   IV,    11.  6.  4    |         healthcare delivery. Matching healthcare resources to healthcare
217   IV,    11.  6.  4    |               healthcare resources to healthcare need is a key means of ensuring
218   IV,    11.  6.  4    |              by the pool. As people’s healthcare needs vary depending on
219   IV,    11.  6.  4    |             to reflect their relative healthcare expenditure needs. Increasingly,
220   IV,    11.  6.  4    |             poor predictors of future healthcare consumption were used to
221   IV,    11.  6.  4    |              basis for entitlement to healthcare services. Benefits packages
222   IV,    11.  6.  4    |           clarify the entitlements to healthcare for citizens, they also
223   IV,    11.  6.  4    | medicalization’ of society and rising healthcare costs have put pressure
224   IV,    11.  6.  4    |            see comprehensive and free healthcare as a right, and are not
225   IV,    11.  6.  4    |              environments of European healthcare and political systems, with
226   IV,    11.  6.  4    |      populations, geographic areas or healthcare providers, and specific
227   IV,    11.  6.  4    |            measure the quality of the healthcare provided. According to many
228   IV,    11.  6.  4    |        examined population and/or the healthcare providers) and to define
229   IV,    11.  6.  4    |          information was collected on healthcare systems and sources of health
230   IV,    11.  6.  4    |             that determine quality of healthcare outcome in myocardial infarction
231   IV,    11.  6.  5    |          Department of Health (2005): Healthcare Output and Productivity:
232   IV,    11.  6.  5    |                 European Hospital and Healthcare Federation (2006): DRGs
233   IV,    11.  6.  5    |          Union. Financing Sustainable Healthcare in Europe: New Approaches
234   IV,    12.  2        |               health and in accessing healthcare. The existence of a strategic
235   IV,    12.  2        |             secondary preventions and healthcare to achieve the adopted objectives.
236   IV,    12.  3        |              adequate and sustainable healthcare and long-term care. The
237   IV,    12.  4        |               re: demographic change, healthcare spending~ECHO~Humanitarian
238   IV,    12.  4        |             aid operations. Access to healthcare in crisis situations and~
239   IV,    12.  4        |             Method of Coordination on Healthcare and~Long Term Care~ENTR~
240   IV,    12.  4        |       Internal market to patients and healthcare providers; recognition of
241   IV,    12.  4        |             method of coordination on healthcare and long-term care. These
242   IV,    12.  4        |               areas:~ ~· cross-border healthcare purchasing and provision,
243   IV,    12.  4        |         Rights enshrines the right to healthcare.~ ~ ~The “health in other
244   IV,    12.  5        |         through high-quality and safe healthcare, including in relation to
245   IV,    12.  7        |         reducing the existing gaps in healthcare provision. A considerable
246   IV,    12.  7        |      Commission’s High Level Group on healthcare and long term care has been
247   IV,    12. 10        |             number of acts within the healthcare sector.~See more: htt 8~
248   IV,    12. 10        |             be integrated in European healthcare systems and civil protection
249   IV,    12. 10        |             of the county councils is healthcare, whilst the municipalities'
250   IV,    12. 10        |           level~Plan and Programme of Healthcare MeasuresHealth education~
251   IV,    12. 10        |           level~Plan and Programme of Healthcare MeasuresHealth education~
252   IV,    12. 10        |           level~Plan and Programme of Healthcare Measures~Air pollution~
253   IV,    13.  2.  4    |              a reduced burden for the healthcare systems and in an even higher
254   IV,    13.  5        |                      13.5. Demands on healthcare services~ ~Population ageing
255   IV,    13.  5        |         Stronger coordination between healthcare and social services is seen
256   IV,    13.  5        |     increasing demands for health and healthcare has been reaffirmed by the
257   IV,    13.  5        |            rights of patients to seek healthcare in other countries and be
258   IV,    13.  5        |               on patient mobility and healthcare developments in the European
259   IV,    13.  5        |               States to achieve their healthcare objectives. In April 2004,
260   IV,    13.  5        |             method of coordination on healthcare and long-term care. These
261   IV,    13.  5        |               areas:~ ~· cross-border healthcare purchasing and provision
262   IV,    13.  5        |         improve their ability to meet healthcare demands of citizens. Therefore,
263   IV,    13.  6.  3    |       guarantees for the provision of healthcare for children. In other countries,
264   IV,    13.  7.  3    |             the optimised delivery of healthcare to European citizens. The “
265   IV,    13.  7.  3    |           supports the development of healthcare technologies and healthcare
266   IV,    13.  7.  3    |           healthcare technologies and healthcare provision in Europe, its
267   IV,    13.  7.  3    |         significant public health and healthcare related topics should be
268  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0    |             health promotion~health21~healthcare~hearing~heart~heatwave~heatwaves~