Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1   II,     5.  2.  4|            cost of health examination surveys. Table 5.2.7 (htt b, 2007)
  2   II,     5.  2.  4|              through health interview surveys. Prevalence of smoking in
  3   II,     5.  2.  4|           reduce events’ (EUROASPIRE) surveys, presented by the European
  4   II,     5.  2.  4|         Vienna (2007). The EUROASPIRE surveys were conducted in 1995-96,
  5   II,     5.  3.  2|                www.esmo.org/resources/surveys/mosesII_survey/~ ~A global
  6   II,     5.  4.Acr|         Diabetes~HIS~Health Interview Surveys~HES~Health Examination Surveys~
  7   II,     5.  4.Acr|        Surveys~HES~Health Examination Surveys~IDF~International Diabetes
  8   II,     5.  4.  2|                       5.4.2.4. Health Surveys~ ~Health Interview Surveys (
  9   II,     5.  4.  2|            Surveys~ ~Health Interview Surveys (HIS) are based on self
 10   II,     5.  4.  2|            whereas Health Examination Surveys (HES) include in addition
 11   II,     5.  4.  2|            between different national surveys persist, particularly for
 12   II,     5.  4.  2|  recommendation in this field is that surveys should include national
 13   II,     5.  4.  2|           described by the HMP Health surveys in the EU: HIS and HIS/HES
 14   II,     5.  4.  2|             motivated GP’s to perform surveys on different items. Among
 15   II,     5.  4.  2|      hospitalised.~Health examination surveys detect both diagnosed and
 16   II,     5.  4.  2|           impossible health interview surveys. Whether the evaluated cohort
 17   II,     5.  5.  1|               2. Data from population surveys~ ~ ~ ESEMeD~ ~The methods
 18   II,     5.  5.  1|              3.~ ~· The Eurobarometer Surveys~ ~Eurobarometer surveys
 19   II,     5.  5.  1|               Surveys~ ~Eurobarometer surveys are presented in detail
 20   II,     5.  5.  1|          Disorders. Two Eurobarometer surveys have included questions
 21   II,     5.  5.  1|            derived from Eurobarometer surveys have certain strengths and
 22   II,     5.  5.  1|       disorders.~ ~· Other population surveys~ ~Mood and anxiety disorders.~
 23   II,     5.  5.  1|               the only two multi site surveys using standardised mental
 24   II,     5.  5.  1|    Nonetheless, some large multi site surveys have attempted to take into
 25   II,     5.  5.  1|       statistical data and population surveys, and consisted of indicators
 26   II,     5.  5.  1|          disorders through the use of surveys conducted in the general
 27   II,     5.  5.  1|              intervals. Mental health surveys should also include measures
 28   II,     5.  5.  1|               WHO World Mental Health Surveys. Br J Psychiatry 192(5):
 29   II,     5.  5.  3|            among research studies and surveys concerning generalisation,
 30   II,     5.  5.  3|               limited number of data, surveys and treatments being available.
 31   II,     5.  5.  3|              measured within national surveys, whereas for other countries
 32   II,     5.  5.  3|                2007) reviewed various surveys, which were published from
 33   II,     5.  5.  3|       Community-based epidemiological surveys on service utilization of
 34   II,     5.  5.  3|             for help seeking in these surveys was 12 months (Kohn et al,
 35   II,     5.  5.  3|            utilization rates in these surveys, population size, and prevalence
 36   II,     5.  5.  3|     WHO-initiated World Mental Health Surveys (WHO, 2004), which were
 37   II,     5.  5.  3|          postinterventional telephone surveys from 2001 to 2004. Nervenarzt
 38   II,     5.  5.  3|      Organization World Mental Health Surveys. Journal of the American
 39   II,     5.  5.  3|              representative telephone surveys before and after three years
 40   II,     5.  5.  3|      Organization World Mental Health Surveys (Kessler RC). JAMA 291 (
 41   II,     5.  5.  3|    comparisons made within and across surveys conducted in specific geographic
 42   II,     5.  5.  3|        frequency trends from multiple surveys. ~Prevalence rates have
 43   II,     5.  5.  3|                looks at the different surveys carried out worldwide; the
 44   II,     5.  5.  3|          majority of population-based surveys have been conducted on all
 45   II,     5.  5.  3|     populations where community-based surveys were conducted (Forsgren
 46   II,     5.  5.  3|             countries. The results of surveys reporting rates at variance
 47   II,     5.  5.  3|              with no population-based surveys. Given the homogeneous ethnic
 48   II,     5.  5.  3|             registry-based nationwide surveys) available since 1992 were
 49   II,     5.  5.  3|           from local small population surveys were also used when the
 50   II,     5.  5.  3|             and analysis~ ~Nearly 200 surveys on MS epidemiology published
 51   II,     5.  5.  3|              in Europe~ ~ ~Systematic surveys in the UK for more than
 52   II,     5.  5.  3|          Portugal.~Several prevalence surveys on MS have been conducted
 53   II,     5.  5.  3|            often based on nation-wide surveys and registry systems. However,
 54   II,     5.  5.  3|         common classification in such surveys. MS is diagnosed more often
 55   II,     5.  5.  3|           uncertainties in prevalence surveys of Parkinson’s disease.
 56   II,     5.  5.  3|               door-to-door, two-phase surveys: an illustration from central
 57   II,     5.  6.  3|              of Population Census and Surveys, found that 30% of disabled
 58   II,     5.  6.  3|              of prevalence. Likewise, surveys that ask for self-reported
 59   II,     5.  6.  3|             is where the burden lies. Surveys show that osteoarthritis
 60   II,     5.  6.  3|         studied. Non-comparability of surveys makes it difficult to understand
 61   II,     5.  6.  6|             Services, UK (1989): OPCS Surveys of disability in Great Britain
 62   II,     5.  6.  6|           Statistics, UK (1989): OPCS Surveys of Disability in Great Britain
 63   II,     5.  6.  6|          comparison of two prevalence surveys at an interval of 10 years.
 64   II,     5.  7.  1|          countries. In Europe several surveys have now been completed (
 65   II,     5.  7.  2|           data usually perform yearly surveys among their renal centres.
 66   II,     5.  7.  3|            are mainly based on NHANES surveys and on a survey made in
 67   II,     5.  7.  3|            Member countries, national surveys on the prevalence of CKD
 68   II,     5.  7.  3|         England, Italy) or population surveys. Data from medical databases
 69   II,     5.  7.  3|           information remain periodic surveys made in the USA (NHANES
 70   II,     5.  7.  3|               respectively). In those surveys, the prevalence of stage
 71   II,     5.  7.  3|         England, Italy) or population surveys. Data from medical databases
 72   II,     5.  9.  3|               range considered in the surveys. These first results can
 73   II,     5.  9.  3|       recorded by questionnaire-based surveys. Indeed, in people from
 74   II,     5.  9.  4|     paediatric population.~ ~Numerous surveys on school-age children have
 75   II,     5.  9.  7|              review of recent patient surveys, BMC Pulmonary Medicine
 76   II,     5. 11.  3|             NICE clinical guideline).~Surveys of specific skin diseases
 77   II,     5. 11.  3|             during teenage years. Yet surveys have suggested that only
 78   II,     5. 11.  6|            any comparative prevalence surveys of skin disease in general
 79   II,     5. 11.  6|        visible, such population-based surveys are difficult and costly
 80   II,     5. 11.  7|          questionnaire for population surveys. Br J Dermatol 2003;149:
 81   II,     5. 14.  1|            care. Information from the surveys on patterns of untreated
 82   II,     5. 14.  2|         regional or local oral health surveys or in specific communities
 83   II,     5. 14.  2|               but the fact that these surveys have more local or regional
 84   II,     5. 14.  2|             their impact. Oral health surveys were based on nationally
 85   II,     5. 14.  2|           Germany, Spain, a series of surveys have been conducted on random
 86   II,     5. 14.  3|               of recent epidemiologic surveys in industrialized countries,
 87   II,     5. 14.  3|              and 40 to 50% of adults. Surveys also show that early-onset
 88   II,     5. 14.  3|            preventive reasons. Recent surveys carried out in Eastern Europe
 89   II,     5. 14.  3|            services.~Several national surveys show that the proportion
 90   II,     5. 14.  5|            care. Information from the surveys on patterns of untreated
 91   II,     6.  3.  2|                On the basis of recent surveys, the total number of patients
 92   II,     7.  2.  8|                                7.2.8. Surveys~ ~Household surveys are
 93   II,     7.  2.  8|              2.8. Surveys~ ~Household surveys are an important source
 94   II,     7.  2.  8|               often derived from such surveys.~ ~Many European countries
 95   II,     7.  2.  8|              a (ir)regular basis such surveys which also contain questions
 96   II,     7.  3.  1|             this overview of national surveys at EU level anticipate also
 97   II,     7.  3.  1|               the EU Health Interview Surveys for injuries treated outside
 98   II,     7.  4.  7|              from crime victimisation surveys. This might involve the
 99   II,     7.  5    |              services (emergency room surveys), and other medical treatments (
100   II,     7.  5    |         medical treatments (household surveys such as the European Core
101   II,     8.Acr    |              DIS~Disability Interview Surveys~EHIS~European Health Interview
102   II,     8.Acr    |          EUHSID~European Union Health Surveys Information Database~HIS~
103   II,     8.  1.  2|                The results of the two surveys were analysed in a comprehensive
104   II,     8.  1.  2|              be collected by means of surveys that make use of common
105   II,     8.  1.  2|         instruments. Health Interview Surveys (HIS) and Disability Interview
106   II,     8.  1.  2|              and Disability Interview Surveys (DIS) are widely accepted
107   II,     8.  1.  4|             information in non-health surveys such as a Labour Force Survey
108   II,     8.  1.  5|         statistical information (like surveys) that aim in monitoring
109   II,     8.  2.  1|          project reports and national surveys in the Member States, although
110   II,     8.  2.  1|             absent from public health surveys. Thus, attempts to monitor
111   II,     8.  2.  1|              health examination (HES) surveys of population health was
112   II,     8.  2.  1|             The European Union Health Surveys Information Database (EUHSID)
113   II,     8.  2.  1|             population health related surveys in Europe (www.iph.fgov.
114   II,     8.  2.  1|      interview and health examination surveys conducted throughout the
115   II,     8.  2.  1|      examination of a sample of these surveys was undertaken as an activity
116   II,     8.  2.  1|    pomonaproject.org). A total of 123 surveys, conducted in 17 European
117   II,     8.  2.  1|          Pomona-I) were examined. The surveys were conducted over two
118   II,     8.  2.  1|             to 2003. The scope of the surveys varied widely ranging from
119   II,     8.  2.  1|              smaller health barometer surveys with sample sizes of N=1,
120   II,     8.  2.  1|               population based census surveys reporting sample sizes in
121   II,     8.  2.  1|       censuses, sample based national surveys, or other statistical formats,
122   II,     8.  2.  1|              DIS~Disability Interview Surveys (DIS)~EHSS~European Health
123   II,     8.  2.  1|          EUHSID~European Union Health Surveys Information Database~ICF~
124   II,     8.  2.  2|     impairment have been carried out. Surveys are available for a number
125   II,     8.  2.  2|              obstained with these two surveys have been analysed in a
126   II,     8.  2.  2|            assumptions to the data of surveys carried out in a limited
127   II,     8.  2.  2|              results of the available surveys, women seem more likely
128   II,     8.  2.  2|             with two population-based surveys representative of the sampled
129   II,     8.  2.  2|            assumptions to the data of surveys carried out in a limited
130   II,     8.  2.  2|              results of the available surveys, women seem more likely
131   II,     8.  2.  2|             with two population-based surveys representative of the sampled
132   II,     8.  2.  2|               developments~ ~Periodic surveys are important for monitoring
133   II,     8.  2.  3|              et al, 2003). In Europe, surveys have been carried out in
134   II,     8.  2.  3|               obtained with these two surveys have been analysed in a
135   II,     8.  2.  3|              available from the other surveys in EU Member States were
136   II,     9        |           first year of life. Special surveys are therefore needed to
137   II,     9.  1.  1|            exclusion criteria used by surveys and registers. To overcome
138   II,     9.  1.  1|             network on cerebral palsy surveys and registers, SCPE (Surveillance
139   II,     9.  1.  1|       collaboration of cerebral palsy surveys and registers. Dev Med Child
140   II,     9.  1.  2|           first year of life. Special surveys are therefore needed to
141   II,     9.  2.  2|          between countries.~ ~General surveys such as national censuses
142   II,     9.  2.  2|       national censuses and household surveys, and health interview and
143   II,     9.  2.  2|              regular health interview surveys to monitor population health,
144   II,     9.  2.  2|          Interview Health Examination Surveys, as well as the work through
145   II,     9.  3.  1|          which link population health surveys with other health data estimating
146   II,     9.  3.  2|       collaboration of cerebral palsy surveys and registers. Dev Med Child
147   II,     9.  3.  3|             have conducted population surveys and available data is usually
148   II,     9.  3.  3|              on sexual behaviour from surveys carried out in 11 European
149   II,     9.  3.  3|             an EU-sponsored series of surveys in England, Finland, France,
150   II,     9.  3.  3|            data are based on national surveys on sexual behaviour and
151   II,     9.  3.  3|         sexual attitude and lifestyle surveys and reported comparisons
152   II,     9.  3.  3|            obtain and compare because surveys are not standardized and
153   II,     9.  3.  3|             Currie et al, 2004). HBSC surveys have started in 1983 and
154   II,     9.  3.  3|      Interview and Health Examination Surveys database, 24 surveys in
155   II,     9.  3.  3|      Examination Surveys database, 24 surveys in 17 EU and accession countries
156   II,     9.  3.  3|           health interview and health surveys database, 2007).~· Systematic
157   II,     9.  3.  3|          Majority of sexual behaviour surveys include both men and women.
158   II,     9.  3.  3|              both men and women. Some surveys collect partner-specific
159   II,     9.  3.  3|   expectations of what is right. Many surveys find that the number of
160   II,     9.  3.  3|              European countries where surveys were conducted. In the North,
161   II,     9.  3.  3|              studied in many national surveys. According to the data from
162   II,     9.  3.  3|             these occasions.~ ~Recent surveys in Finland notice a higher
163   II,     9.  3.  3|             number of indicators when surveys are carried out. The most
164   II,     9.  3.  3|           post behaviour reporting.~ ~Surveys historically have suggested
165   II,     9.  3.  3|     integrated part of general health surveys using comparative sexual
166   II,     9.  3.  3|               comparisons of national surveys. (Edited by:Hubert M, Bajos
167   II,     9.  3.  3|               Comparisons of National Surveys. UCL Press. London. 442
168   II,     9.  4.  5|   co-ordination among care providers. Surveys of therapies and the inclusion
169   II,     9.  5.  3|           been only two multinational surveys, both of which were carried
170  III,    10.  2.  1|             basis of health interview surveys which can yield variable
171  III,    10.  2.  1|             out such health interview surveys on a more or less regular
172  III,    10.  2.  1|            habits in health interview surveys across OECD countries. There
173  III,    10.  2.  1|               gathered through annual surveys conducted by Statistic Sweden
174  III,    10.  2.  1|              databaseEurobarometer surveys~ ~Commission-funded projects~ ~·
175  III,    10.  2.  1|             International comparative surveys~ ~· European Schools Project
176  III,    10.  2.  1|           based on general population surveys have been presented in Table
177  III,    10.  2.  1|                measured by population surveys~ ~Most of illicit drug use
178  III,    10.  2.  1|        recorded in general population surveys tends to be discontinued
179  III,    10.  2.  1|              use~ ~General population surveys might not be able to realistically
180  III,    10.  2.  1|               for Implementing School Surveys on Drug Abuse . Available
181  III,    10.  2.  1|         regional or local oral health surveys or in specific communities
182  III,    10.  2.  1|        obtainable from children based surveys and from a non institutionalized
183  III,    10.  2.  1|               of recent epidemiologic surveys in industrialized countries,
184  III,    10.  2.  1|           improved since the previous surveys, this does not mean that
185  III,    10.  2.  1|           available from a variety of surveys with different degrees of
186  III,    10.  2.  1|               the following, the main surveys are briefly presented.~ ~
187  III,    10.  2.  1|           briefly presented.~ ~Global surveys including EU countries~ ~
188  III,    10.  2.  1|            EFTA Countries.~ ~European surveys~ ~a) Eurobarometer survey
189  III,    10.  2.  1|                separate supplementary surveys on special topics have been
190  III,    10.  2.  1|           available from a variety of surveys and studies which use different
191  III,    10.  2.  1|             questionnaires, telephone surveys or personal interviews).
192  III,    10.  2.  1|           comparable across different surveys unless certain procedures
193  III,    10.  2.  1|               been measured in annual surveys since 1979 (Helakorpi et
194  III,    10.  2.  1|           2002 and 2004 Eurobarometer surveys showed an increase in the
195  III,    10.  2.  1|               been measured in annual surveys in Finland since 1979 (Helakorpi
196  III,    10.  2.  1|         FINBALT study, HBSC and other surveys in young people. Journal
197  III,    10.  2.  1|             also carried out national surveys in adolescents (Bayingana
198  III,    10.  2.  1|               In contrast to national surveys, European surveys can be
199  III,    10.  2.  1|            national surveys, European surveys can be used for comparisons
200  III,    10.  2.  1|             However, national dietary surveys are carried out in many
201  III,    10.  2.  1|            studied. Frequency of such surveys vary between every two(Finland)
202  III,    10.  2.  1|              addition to the national surveys, food consumption data are
203  III,    10.  2.  1|             national food consumption surveys of each European country
204  III,    10.  2.  1|             national food consumption surveys of the European countries
205  III,    10.  2.  1|            data from household budget surveys (HBS: Naska et al., 2007;
206  III,    10.  2.  1|         related data derived from the surveys. Methods were designed to
207  III,    10.  2.  1|              It includes data from 75 surveys in 16 European countries(
208  III,    10.  2.  1|              overview of the national surveys from fourteen European countries
209  III,    10.  2.  1|         Rolland-Cachera et al, 2002). Surveys based on self-reported weight
210  III,    10.  2.  1|    insufficiently supplied nutrients. Surveys have revealed low intakes
211  III,    10.  2.  1|              cardiovascular diseases.~Surveys have shown that intakes
212  III,    10.  2.  1|            the DAFNE household budget surveys are reported in Table 10.
213  III,    10.  2.  1|              In contrast to household surveys, data from individual surveys
214  III,    10.  2.  1|         surveys, data from individual surveys provide information on average
215  III,    10.  2.  1|         national health and lifestyle surveys: survey of lifestyle, attitudes
216  III,    10.  2.  1|           national health & lifestyle surveys: survey of lifestyle, attitudes
217  III,    10.  2.  1|             telephone and examination surveys. Revue dEpidémiologie et
218  III,    10.  2.  1|             national health interview surveys (HIS), Eurostat: health
219  III,    10.  2.  1|             national health interview surveys (HIS), Eurostat: health
220  III,    10.  2.  1|             national health interview surveys (HIS), Eurostat: health
221  III,    10.  2.  1|             national health interview surveys (HIS), Eurostat: survey
222  III,    10.  3.  1|             social and socio-acoustic surveys (2003). Reference: ISO/TC
223  III,    10.  4.  2|               of a series of baseline surveys in laying hens, turkeys,
224  III,    10.  4.  2|            meat. The results of these surveys are used to set EU targets
225  III,    10.  4.  2|               and storage. Systematic surveys of pesticide usage on farms
226  III,    10.  4.  2|            other countries. In recent surveys no pesticide residues were
227  III,    10.  4.  5|               a result of preliminary surveys, just over 60 % of the sites -
228  III,    10.  5.  2|             data from children health surveys indicate that for most health
229  III,    10.  5.  2|                2005).~ ~For Scotland, surveys found that patients distant
230  III,    10.  5.  3|               conditions are European Surveys carried out by the European
231  III,    10.  5.  3|             the European labour force surveys in 1999 and 2002. The European
232  III,    10.  6.  1|          should be included in health surveys and epidemiological data
233  III,    10.  6.  1|         Common Instruments for Health Surveys. IOS Press, WHO, 2003.~ ~S E (
234  III,    10.  6.  3|           International Crime Victims Surveys (ICVSs), and which addresses
235  III,    10.  6.  3|            difficult in victimisation surveys, since perceptions as to
236  III,    10.  6.  3|             not possible to undertake surveys on infants or house-bound
237   IV,    11.  1.  4|               can be measured through surveys - also the different principles
238   IV,    11.  1.  5|          information systems, patient surveys, clinical governance and
239   IV,    11.  1.  5|      experiences~ ~Public and patient surveys shed light on the level
240   IV,    11.  1.  5|              Moreover, public opinion surveys such as the Eurobarometer
241   IV,    11.  1.  5|             such as the Eurobarometer surveys coordinated by the European
242   IV,    11.  1.  5|            styles. Results from these surveys are also inherently subjective,
243   IV,    11.  1.  5|         through population or patient surveys and opinion polls. Comparative
244   IV,    11.  1.  5|             Germany).~ ~Eurobarometer surveys also provide an indication
245   IV,    11.  4    |              or healthcare registers, surveys, epidemiologic studies etc.~ ~
246   IV,    11.  6.  2|        estimating their scale, recent surveys and qualitative studies
247   IV,    11.  6.  2|             for surgery - and several surveys have found that they tend
248   IV,    12.  5    |   Epidemiological studies~- Data from Surveys (e. g. population representative
249   IV,    12.  5    |      population representative health surveys, health surveys in special
250   IV,    12.  5    | representative health surveys, health surveys in special population subgroups)~ ~ ~
251   IV,    12. 10    |      subscription schemes in schools, surveys of consumers' attitudes
252   IV,    12. 10    |             rates by several national surveys: National health surveys,
253   IV,    12. 10    |              surveys: National health surveys, Telephone health surveys
254   IV,    12. 10    |             surveys, Telephone health surveys and Health Interview and
255   IV,    12. 10    |               is monitored by several surveys: National health surveys,
256   IV,    12. 10    |              surveys: National health surveys, Telephone health surveys
257   IV,    12. 10    |             surveys, Telephone health surveys and Health Interview and
258   IV,    12. 10    |               part of National Health Surveys (see www.rki.de).~ ~Nutritional
259   IV,    12. 10    |          monitored at National Health Surveys (see www. ~ ~Genomics and
260   IV,    12. 10    |               part of national health surveys conducted by Robert Koch-Institute (
261   IV,    12. 10    |            living in Ireland. To date surveys have been carried out in
262   IV,    13.  6.  2|               not answer satisfaction surveys. Outcome measures are difficult