Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  8    |              Potential for accidental injuries and/or fatalities~ ~Biomass~ ~
  2   II,     5.  1.  1|             non psychiatric diseases. Injuries, poisoning and violence
  3   II,     5.  5.  3|           osteoarthritis, orthopaedic injuries and stress fractures, ruptured
  4   II,     5.  5.  3|              was mainly the result of injuries from accidents and poisonings
  5   II,     5.  5.  3|            sixth rank, self inflicted injuries eleventh, and dementia fourteenth).
  6   II,     5.  5.  3|         review with focus on physical injuries, mortality, traffic accidents
  7   II,     5.  6.  1|        disorders; (5) musculoskeletal injuries e.g. high energy limb fractures,
  8   II,     5.  6.  1|             conditions not related to injuries or traumas are sometimes
  9   II,     5.  6.  4|             of costs. Musculoskeletal injuries and disorders cause more
 10   II,     5. 11.  5|            food-related diseases, and injuries. Based on evidence on the
 11   II,     6.  3.  5|               seen after contaminated injuries, and the infection is not
 12   II,     7        |                      7.~ACCIDENTS AND INJURIES AND RELATED TIME TRENDS:
 13   II,     7.  1    |                   7.1. Introduction~ ~Injuries (unintentional due to “accidents”
 14   II,     7.  1    |             are medically treated for injuries each year and about 250,
 15   II,     7.  1    |            young adults accidents and injuries are the leading cause of
 16   II,     7.  1    |      differences in the occurrence of injuries in different EU Member Countries,
 17   II,     7.  1    |        European Union have identified injuries as one area which should
 18   II,     7.  1    |           Resolution on Prevention of Injuries in the WHO European Region.
 19   II,     7.  1    |               of the injury is short. Injuries are often classified as
 20   II,     7.  1    |         addition to intent and cause, injuries can be categorized by their
 21   II,     7.  1    |           illness or premature death, injuries are widely preventable by
 22   II,     7.  1    |     addressing the external causes of injuries such as roads, work places,
 23   II,     7.  1    |      interventions designed to reduce injuries. In order to be able to
 24   II,     7.  1    |           order to be able to prevent injuries effectively it is important
 25   II,     7.  1    |            how many fractures or head injuries have occurred, but also
 26   II,     7.  1    |               reduce the frequency of injuries due to accidents and violence
 27   II,     7.  1    |              consumer product-related injuries. There is also ample evidence
 28   II,     7.  1    |          social toll of accidents and injuries, in particular by addressing
 29   II,     7.  1    |               public health action on injuries as proposed by the Council
 30   II,     7.  2    |          periodically collect data on injuries that are used to measure
 31   II,     7.  2    |            magnitude of the burden of injuries in the EU. These data sources
 32   II,     7.  2    |               a comprehensive view of injuries in the EU:~ ~
 33   II,     7.  2.  1|             Chapters on accidents and injuries~ ~ICD-10:~- Chapter XIX:
 34   II,     7.  2.  1|         tourists). The information on injuries which is collected via death
 35   II,     7.  2.  1|  Classification of External Causes of Injuries~ ~ICECI has been developed
 36   II,     7.  2.  1|            the circumstances in which injuries occur on voluntary basis
 37   II,     7.  2.  2|               causes on accidents and injuries - ICD10 Chapter XX – is
 38   II,     7.  2.  2|           hospital discharge data for injuries see the final report of
 39   II,     7.  2.  2|        Discharge Database HDD) due to injuries of several countries was
 40   II,     7.  2.  6|           Swedencover all types of injuries, unintentional injuries
 41   II,     7.  2.  6|               injuries, unintentional injuries as well as injuries due
 42   II,     7.  2.  6|     unintentional injuries as well as injuries due to self-harm and interpersonal
 43   II,     7.  2.  7|            Research and Prevention of Injuries (CE.RE.PR.I.). This portal
 44   II,     7.  2.  7|      accidents resulting in deaths or injuries, with a friendly interface
 45   II,     7.  2.  8|            questions on accidents and injuries~ ~Within the European Core
 46   II,     7.  2.  8|                selected indicators on injuries are collected.~htt ~ ~
 47   II,     7.  2.  9|              for the medical costs of injuries.~htt ~ ~The delivery of
 48   II,     7.  3    |             chapter is the “Report on Injuries in the European Union, Statistics
 49   II,     7.  3.  1|              1. Comprehensive View of Injuries~ ~The figures given in Table
 50   II,     7.  3.  1|              a “comprehensive view of injuries in the EU” by different
 51   II,     7.  3.  1|          Health Interview Surveys for injuries treated outside of hospitals (“
 52   II,     7.  3.  1|              of injury disability) of injuries by sector are given.~ ~The
 53   II,     7.  3.  1|             The comprehensive view of injuries (CVI) in Table 7.1. Comprehensive
 54   II,     7.  3.  1|              1. Comprehensive view of injuries by sector, EU27 allows for
 55   II,     7.  3.  1|             are medically treated for injuries each year; this is more
 56   II,     7.  3.  1|              Italy:~ ~- 252 000 Fatal Injuries~- 7 000 000 Hospital Admissions~-
 57   II,     7.  3.  1|         public health toll;~· Traffic injuries account for approximately
 58   II,     7.  3.  1|            approximately 23% of fatal injuries but only for 7% of non-fatal
 59   II,     7.  3.  1|              only for 7% of non-fatal injuries.~· More than 80% of accidents
 60   II,     7.  3.  1|             the setting with the most injuries by far;~· EU-wide two thirds
 61   II,     7.  3.  1|             EU-wide two thirds of all injuries are treated in hospitals,
 62   II,     7.  3.  1|              1. Comprehensive view of injuries by sector, EU27~ ~
 63   II,     7.  3.  2|              7.3.2. Mortality - Fatal injuries~ ~As demonstrated in the
 64   II,     7.  3.  2|             the comprehensive view of injuries in Table 7.1, fatal injuries
 65   II,     7.  3.  2|          injuries in Table 7.1, fatal injuries are just the tip of the
 66   II,     7.  3.  2|         frequently used indicator for injuries and has a high level of
 67   II,     7.  3.  2|             million people each year. Injuries kill more children, adolescents
 68   II,     7.  3.  2|              through to old together, injuries represent the fourth major
 69   II,     7.  3.  2|       difference in the rate of fatal injuries throughout the EU. Based
 70   II,     7.  3.  2|              by intent, unintentional injuries are responsible for about
 71   II,     7.  3.  2|          deaths (68%) and intentional injuries for about one third (27%)
 72   II,     7.  3.  2|               2).~ ~Figure 7.2. Fatal injuries by causes of death, all
 73   II,     7.  3.  2|            looking at gender and age, injuries affect males and females
 74   II,     7.  3.  2|              death rate (SDR) for all injuries in the EU experienced a
 75   II,     7.  3.  2|              Selected causes of fatal injuries, Standardised Death Rates (
 76   II,     7.  3.  3|       admissions due to accidents and injuries in the EU27 sum up to almost
 77   II,     7.  3.  3|            Hospital discharges due to injuries, EU27, 2003-2005~ ~On average
 78   II,     7.  3.  3|            hospital discharges due to injuries per 100 000 inhabitants
 79   II,     7.  3.  3|       hospital inpatients treated for injuries (Table 7.3).~ ~Table 7.3.
 80   II,     7.  3.  3|             Hospital discharge due to injuries, EU27: Minimum and maximum
 81   II,     7.  3.  3|            per country~ ~Accident and injuries are extraordinarily detrimental
 82   II,     7.  3.  3|      sick leave and disability due to injuries yet, both are important
 83   II,     7.  3.  3|     sick leave days are the result of injuries (Bauer et al, 2007).~ ~
 84   II,     7.  3.  4|                  7.3.4. Unintentional injuries - overview by sector~ ~Unintentional
 85   II,     7.  3.  4|             by sector~ ~Unintentional injuries can be assigned to three
 86   II,     7.  3.  4|              7.6. Unintentional fatal injuries by sector, EU27~ ~While
 87   II,     7.  3.  4|               of the vast majority of injuries may cause even more concern.
 88   II,     7.  3.  4|         accidents only sustain slight injuries (Figure 7.9).~ ~Figure 7.
 89   II,     7.  3.  4|             the setting in which most injuries happen and for which capacities
 90   II,     7.  3.  4|         accidents also comprise sport injuries that account for about 18%
 91   II,     7.  3.  4|        indicators on hospital treated injuries, on both inpatients and
 92   II,     7.  3.  5|                    7.3.5. Intentional injuries~ ~Intentional injuries (
 93   II,     7.  3.  5|    Intentional injuries~ ~Intentional injuries (suicide and homicide, assault,
 94   II,     7.  3.  5|              account for 27% of fatal injuries but only for 7.4% of all
 95   II,     7.  3.  5|           future details on self harm injuries of hospital treated patients.~ ~
 96   II,     7.  3.  5|              accounts for 2% of fatal injuries in the EU27 and in particular
 97   II,     7.  3.  5|            Not all assaults result in injuries severe enough to require
 98   II,     7.  3.  5|             that do result in serious injuriessurveillance systems for
 99   II,     7.  3.  5|         reporting and compiling these injuries are in many countries either
100   II,     7.  3.  5|            circumstances of non-fatal injuries due to homicide, assault
101   II,     7.  3.  5|         future deliver information on injuries due to violence of hospital
102   II,     7.  4    |               impact of accidents and injuries. The huge burden of accidents
103   II,     7.  4    |               burden of accidents and injuries to societies and individuals
104   II,     7.  4    |           young people: Accidents and injuries are the leading cause of
105   II,     7.  4    |              Many survivors of severe injuries suffer lifelong impairment.
106   II,     7.  4    |             quantified, accidents and injuries are assumed to be the main
107   II,     7.  4    |           average, in all age groups, injuries account for about 8% of
108   II,     7.  4    |           health and welfare systems, injuries often affect the whole family,
109   II,     7.  4    |      sick leave and disability due to injuries. Both are important factors
110   II,     7.  4    |     sick leave days are the result of injuries.~• Unequal in its impact
111   II,     7.  4    |          standards (e.g. road traffic injuries and, work place injuries).
112   II,     7.  4    |              injuries and, work place injuries). In other areas, further
113   II,     7.  4    |            address the high impact of injuries on health and to develop
114   II,     7.  4    |           areas:~ ~· Social impact of injuries in terms of number, severity
115   II,     7.  4    |       Vulnerable road users;~· Sports injuries;~· Injuries caused by products
116   II,     7.  4    |           users;~· Sports injuries;~· Injuries caused by products and services;~·
117   II,     7.  4.  1|          chosen as a priority because injuries and their disabling consequences
118   II,     7.  4.  1|           group:~ ~The share of fatal injuries is higher in very young
119   II,     7.  4.  1|         medical centres for traumatic injuries each year (Working Group
120   II,     7.  4.  1|                  Figure 7.19.a. Fatal injuries by cause of death, 1-4 years
121   II,     7.  4.  1|             this age group die due to injuries (Kumpala & Paavola 2008);
122   II,     7.  4.  1|                  Figure 7.19.b. Fatal injuries by causes of death, 15-24
123   II,     7.  4.  1|          situation analysis regarding injuries and risk taking, a good
124   II,     7.  4.  1|             reducing the high toll of injuries among adolescents in EU
125   II,     7.  4.  2|               deaths (Figure 7.19.C). Injuries, at an advanced age account
126   II,     7.  4.  2|               and non-fatal traumatic injuries is expected if no substantial
127   II,     7.  4.  2|                  Figure 7.19.c. Fatal injuries by causes of death, 65+
128   II,     7.  4.  2|           prevention of unintentional injuries among EU senior citizens” (
129   II,     7.  4.  3|           road users~ ~Road transport injuries are one of the major contributors
130   II,     7.  4.  3|             Only about 12% of cyclist injuries have been reported by police
131   II,     7.  4.  3|              taken from the report on injuries to eulnerable road users
132   II,     7.  4.  4|               4. Prevention of sports injuries~ ~Sport makes an important
133   II,     7.  4.  4|        professionals is due to sports injuries in the EU27. The long term
134   II,     7.  4.  4|             large proportion of these injuries, for instance osteoarthritis
135   II,     7.  4.  4|               the top among the fatal injuries (Working Group of Governmental
136   II,     7.  4.  4|                2003-2005~ ~The “sport injuriespriority area is closely
137   II,     7.  4.  4|              benefits are lost due to injuries. Sport injuries are also
138   II,     7.  4.  4|           lost due to injuries. Sport injuries are also a very frequent
139   II,     7.  4.  4|        possibilities to prevent sport injuries such as modifying and improving
140   II,     7.  4.  5|                  7.4.5. Prevention of injuries caused by products and services~ ~
141   II,     7.  4.  5|             fact that the majority of injuries occur in the “home, leisure
142   II,     7.  4.  5|            product or service related injuries provide the opportunity
143   II,     7.  4.  5|               safety and reduction of injuries Community-wide (European
144   II,     7.  5    |            health or premature death, injuries can be prevented by making
145   II,     7.  5    |            reference bookPreventing injuries and violence” (WHO, 2007;
146   II,     7.  5    |       services: Not all accidents and injuries can be prevented. Pre-hospital
147   II,     7.  5    |             in limiting the impact of injuriesPrevention: Effective
148   II,     7.  5    |          vulnerable road users; sport injuries; injuries caused by products
149   II,     7.  5    |           road users; sport injuries; injuries caused by products and services;
150   II,     7.  5    |          vulnerable road users, sport injuries, products and services,
151   II,     7.  5    |             producing annual reportsInjuries in the European Union” (
152   II,     7.  5    |               to prevent violence and injuries. Models are available from
153   II,     7.  6    |      decreasing trend of the rates of injuries, whereby this development
154   II,     7.  6    |          creating hazards and causing injuries (as it is the case in interpersonal
155   II,     7.  6    |           number of fatalities due to injuries is to a large extent the
156   II,     7.  7    |            Research and Prevention of Injuries (CERPRI), Department of
157   II,     7.  7    |           prevention of unintentional injuries among EU senior citizens.
158   II,     7.  7    |            Research and Prevention of Injuries (CERPRI), Department of
159   II,     7.  7    |       32001L0095).~ ~EuroSafe (2008): Injuries in the European Union (EU).
160   II,     7.  7    |            Körmer C, Smolka D (2008): Injuries to Vulnerable Road Users
161   II,     7.  7    |                 Kumpula et al (2008): Injuries and risk-taking among young
162   II,     7.  7    |      Verkehrssicherheit (KfV) (2007): Injuries in the European Union -
163   II,     7.  7    |               of the global burden of injuries. Geneva, World Health Organization,
164   II,     7.  7    |        Developing policies to prevent injuries and violence: guidelines
165   II,     7.  7    |            violence and unintentional injuries: WHO European survey. Copenhagen,
166   II,     7.  7    |           Organization (WHO) (2005a): Injuries and violence in Europe –
167   II,     7.  7    |       Resolution on the prevention of injuries in the WHO European Region.
168   II,     7.  7    |               WHO) (2007): Preventing injuries and violence: a guide for
169   II,     8.  1.  1|             quantified, accidents and injuries are assumed to be the main
170   II,     8.  2.  2|           classification of diseases, injuries and causes of death, 10th
171   II,     9        |        vehicle and pedestrian-related injuries. Although older drivers
172   II,     9.  2.  1|        problems include unintentional injuries (such as motor vehicle accidents,
173   II,     9.  2.  3|             the whole of childhood.~ ~Injuries: As already indicated earlier
174   II,     9.  2.  3|          intentional injury. Physical injuries are the main cause of death
175   II,     9.  2.  3|             1115-year-olds sustained injuries requiring medical attention
176   II,     9.  2.  3|            HBSC, 2004). Unintentional injuries include road traffic accidents,
177   II,     9.  2.  3|            primary cause of childhood injuries in Europe. One in three
178   II,     9.  2.  3|             all deaths and 15% of all injuries from traffic accidents (
179   II,     9.  2.  3|              and fighting: Accidental injuries are but one aspect of violence,
180   II,     9.  2.  3|               by the WHO. Intentional injuries include child abuse and
181   II,     9.  2.  3|               neglect, self-inflicted injuries, bullying, psychological
182   II,     9.  2.  5|                ensure protection from injuries and adequate physical activity~·
183   II,     9.  2.  7|               Health and Environment. Injuries.~Available at: htt p (accessed
184   II,     9.  3.  1|              EU, 2005~ ~Accidents and injuries~ ~In the 15-64 age group
185   II,     9.  3.  1|            more fatal accidents. Most injuries occur in the upper extremities
186   II,     9.  3.  1|            and Safety at Work, 2007). Injuries per 100 000 are particularly
187   II,     9.  3.  1|           Belgium. The lowest rate of injuries in the workplace are reported
188   II,     9.  3.  3|           health to mental health and injuries. The WHO estimates unsafe
189   II,     9.  4.  3|               area.~ ~ ~Accidents and injuries~ ~In the age group above
190   II,     9.  4.  3|        vehicle and pedestrian-related injuries. Although older drivers
191   II,     9.  4.  3|                   Figure 9.4.2. Fatal injuries by causes of death, 65+~ ~
192   II,     9.  4.  4|        vehicle and pedestrian-related injuries. Although older drivers
193   II,     9.  4.  7|             disability from diseases, injuries, and risk factors in 1990
194   II,     9.  4.  7|               WHO/HEN (2004): How can injuries in children and older people
195   II,     9.  5.  2|          Programme, Rare Diseases and Injuries and Accidents).~See also
196  III,    10.  1    |       diseases, disease groupings and injuries covered by the World Health
197  III,    10.  1    |      exploited or are at high risk of injuries due to environmental factors.
198  III,    10.  2.  1|             diabetes, musculoskeletal injuries, pregnancy and early childhood
199  III,    10.  2.  1|               non-fatal accidents and injuries. People who usually drink
200  III,    10.  2.  1|        between the ages of 20 and 64, injuries are responsible for nearly
201  III,    10.  2.  1|       responsible for 29% of all male injuries and 19% of all female injuries,
202  III,    10.  2.  1|        injuries and 19% of all female injuries, in the central and eastern
203  III,    10.  2.  1|            disease and self-inflicted injuries also prominent (Ljung et
204  III,    10.  2.  1|                reduce alcohol-related injuries and fatalities.~ ~Setting
205  III,    10.  2.  1| alcohol-related motor vehicle-related injuries (Ditter et al, 2005). However,
206  III,    10.  2.  1|        traffic fatalities and assault injuries (Giesbrecht, 2003). Community
207  III,    10.  2.  1|              cause fatal accidents or injuries as well as chronic problems
208  III,    10.  3.  2|      inadequate toxic waste disposal, injuries and poisonings, urbanization,
209  III,    10.  3.  2|               in terms of fatalities, injuries, environmental pollution
210  III,    10.  3.  4|             Increased risk of deaths, injuries, infectious, respiratory
211  III,    10.  3.  4|          Increased risk of deaths and injuries from drowning and of negative
212  III,    10.  3.  4|      floodwaters (such as drowning or injuries) and indirect effects caused
213  III,    10.  3.  4|         flooding range from death and injuries (sprains/strains, lacerations, "
214  III,    10.  3.  4|          strains, lacerations, "other injuries" as well as abrasions and
215  III,    10.  3.  4|              floods include traumatic injuries, waterborne and vector-borne
216  III,    10.  3.  4|            smoke inhalation and other injuries. Since 1990, 228 people
217  III,    10.  4.  3|             environmental factors and injuries among Europe’s children
218  III,    10.  4.  4|             fact that the majority of injuries occur in the “home, leisure
219  III,    10.  4.  4|              obvious.~ ~Accidents and injuries associated to non-food consumer
220  III,    10.  4.  4|             involved in accidents and injuries and can provide a minimum
221  III,    10.  4.  4|               safety and reduction of injuries Community-wide. Valuable
222  III,    10.  5.  1|             2006).~Unintentional home injuries are a serious public health
223  III,    10.  5.  1|              million home and leisure injuries requiring medical attention.
224  III,    10.  5.  1|             often, the number of home injuries can exceed the number of
225  III,    10.  5.  1|            the number of road traffic injuries (Bayerisches Landesamt für
226  III,    10.  5.  1|    housing-related health effects and injuries, and mitigate social and
227  III,    10.  5.  1|               July 2007).~IDB (2006): Injuries in the European Union -
228  III,    10.  5.  2|           infections or road accident injuries (see also Section 8.3.1.)~
229  III,    10.  5.  3|           included. Beside accidental injuries the ad-hoc-module 1999 of
230  III,    10.  5.  3|             out for the UK Industrial Injuries Advisory Council (Walters,
231  III,    10.  5.  3|            WHO, workplace fatalities, injuries and illnesses remain at
232  III,    10.  5.  3|        enterprises.~ ~Musculoskeletal injuries:~Musculoskeletal disorders (
233  III,    10.  5.  3|       Work-related skin /eye /hearing injuries:~The framework directive
234  III,    10.  5.  3|               87 dB(A).~Falls-related injuries:~Slips, trips and falls
235  III,    10.  5.  3|               of fatalities and major injuries at work by 10% till 2010.
236  III,    10.  5.  3|           ESAW~European statistics of injuries At Work~EWCS~European Working
237  III,    10.  6.  2|                respectively, and that injuries and cancers, particularly
238  III,    10.  6.  3|              accounts for 2% of fatal injuries of all age groups in the
239  III,    10.  6.  3|            Not all assaults result in injuries severe enough to require
240  III,    10.  6.  3|             that do result in serious injuriessurveillance systems for
241  III,    10.  6.  3|         reporting and compiling these injuries are in many countries either
242  III,    10.  6.  3|            circumstances of non-fatal injuries due to homicide, assault
243  III,    10.  6.  3|              limited to main physical injuries.~ ~
244   IV,    11.  1.  5|           deaths and over one million injuries per year in the US (American
245   IV,    11.  2.  2|        dependence, health monitoring, injuries, rare diseases and pollution-related
246   IV,    11.  6.  4|              methods for diseases and injuries should be promoted in order
247   IV,    12.  1    |         incidence of home and leisure injuries~Pollution-related diseases~
248   IV,    12.  2    |                reduce alcohol-related injuries and fatalities.~ ~Setting
249   IV,    12.  2    | alcohol-related motor vehicle-related injuries (Ditter et al, 2005). However,
250   IV,    12.  2    |        traffic fatalities and assault injuries. Community mobilization
251   IV,    12.  5    |             reduce major diseases and injuries by tackling health determinants~ ~
252   IV,    12.  5    |              mortality and morbidity, injuries and accidents, mental health
253   IV,    12. 10    |           alcohol-related diseases or injuries~Domain of objective 11~ ~
254   IV,    12. 10    |   Environments that can be related to injuries~ ~Number of injured persons
255   IV,    12. 10    |       Products that can be related to injuries~Number of persons injured
256   IV,    13.Acr    |        dependence, health monitoring, injuries, rare diseases and pollution-related
257   IV,    13.  2.  2|            sixth rank, self inflicted injuries eleventh, and dementia fourteenth).
258   IV,    13.  2.  3|               are at a higher risk of injuries due to environmental factors.
259  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|       influenzae~inhalation~injecting~injuries~injury~in-patient~in-patients~