Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1   II,     5.  1.  1    |             HPV is usually spread by sexual contact. Abnormal cells,
  2   II,     5.  1.  1    |            or ridiculed, physical or sexual abuse.~Social Factors: cultural
  3   II,     5.  3.  4    |             HPV is usually spread by sexual contact. Abnormal cells,
  4   II,     5.  5.  3    |            or ridiculed, physical or sexual abuse;~· Social Factors:
  5   II,     5.  5.  3    |            altered pain sensitivity, sexual dysfunction, obstetric complications,
  6   II,     5.  5.  3    |      function e.g bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction, psychiatric
  7   II,     5. 11.  1    |        important organ of social and sexual contact. Perhaps the greatest
  8   II,     6.  3.  3    |            of their first injection. Sexual transmission seems to be
  9   II,     6.  3.  6    |       described linking the cause to sexual contacts between men who
 10   II,     6.  3.  6    |   contaminated food, though recently sexual transmission among men who
 11   II,     7.  3.  5    |              deaths due to homicide, sexual assault, neglect and abandonment,
 12   II,     7.  3.  5    |              concerned. Physical and sexual assaults occur daily, though
 13   II,     7.  4.  6    |              history of physical and sexual abuse in childhood, and
 14   II,     7.  4.  6    |       factors vary with age, gender, sexual orientation and ethnic group.
 15   II,     7.  4.  7    |          forms (physical, mental and sexual) and occurs in different
 16   II,     9            |            see also Section 10.2).~ ~Sexual health and behaviour. Sexual
 17   II,     9            |         Sexual health and behaviour. Sexual behaviour is an important
 18   II,     9            |       cervical cancer, such as early sexual activity, sexually transmitted
 19   II,     9            |           and women have their first sexual intercourse at about the
 20   II,     9            |              by a comparatively late sexual initiation for both sexes (
 21   II,     9            |             respond to the survey on sexual health, as the questions
 22   II,     9            |      contraception during their last sexual intercourse. However, several
 23   II,     9            |             not include questions on sexual health (WHO/HSBC, 2004).~ ~
 24   II,     9.  2.  2    |        alcohol consumption patterns, sexual health practices, and other
 25   II,     9.  2.  3    |      physical assault and injury, to sexual abuse (both of boys and
 26   II,     9.  2.  3    |           child-on-child violence.~ ~Sexual behaviour: General information
 27   II,     9.  2.  3    |               General information on sexual behaviour in adolescents
 28   II,     9.  2.  3    |             found in chapter9.3.3. Sexual health”~ ~Sexually transmitted
 29   II,     9.  2.  4    |            see also Section 10.2).~ ~Sexual health and behaviour. Sexual
 30   II,     9.  2.  4    |         Sexual health and behaviour. Sexual behaviour is an important
 31   II,     9.  2.  4    |       cervical cancer, such as early sexual activity, sexually transmitted
 32   II,     9.  2.  4    |           and women have their first sexual intercourse at about the
 33   II,     9.  2.  4    |              by a comparatively late sexual initiation for both sexes (
 34   II,     9.  2.  4    |             respond to the survey on sexual health, as the questions
 35   II,     9.  2.  4    |      contraception during their last sexual intercourse. However, several
 36   II,     9.  2.  4    |             not include questions on sexual health (WHO/HSBC, 2004).~ ~
 37   II,     9.  2.  5    |         trafficking in human beings, sexual exploitation, children in
 38   II,     9.  2.  5    |         trafficking in human beings, sexual tourism, participation of
 39   II,     9.  2.  5    |          strategies to address risky sexual behaviours among young people;
 40   II,     9.  3.  1    |             gives them less power in sexual relationships and therefore
 41   II,     9.  3.  1    |           imply a decrease in female sexual function associated to the
 42   II,     9.  3.  1    |             many factors that affect sexual function. Other factors
 43   II,     9.  3.  1    |            include the presence of a sexual partner, partner’s age and
 44   II,     9.  3.  1    |           the partner, level of past sexual function, social class,
 45   II,     9.  3.  1    |         towards menopause. Declining sexual function is common but not
 46   II,     9.  3.  1    |         multifaceted process of male sexual function.’ (NIH consensus
 47   II,     9.  3.  1    |            different areas: somatic, sexual and psychological.~ ~The
 48   II,     9.  3.  1    |            composition parameters.~ ~Sexual complaints are also common
 49   II,     9.  3.  1    |            on everyday life, such as sexual difficulties, inability
 50   II,     9.  3.  3    |                               9.3.3. Sexual health~ ~
 51   II,     9.  3.  3    |              1. Introduction~ ~Human sexual behavior encompasses the
 52   II,     9.  3.  3    |              emotional intimacy, and sexual contact. Sexual behaviours
 53   II,     9.  3.  3    |        intimacy, and sexual contact. Sexual behaviours are expressed
 54   II,     9.  3.  3    |       culture, ethnicity, economics, sexual orientation and past experiences -
 55   II,     9.  3.  3    |           central to achievements of sexual health. Sexual behaviour
 56   II,     9.  3.  3    |       achievements of sexual health. Sexual behaviour usually analysed
 57   II,     9.  3.  3    |              aspects of health, from sexual and reproductive health
 58   II,     9.  3.  3    |              has includedpromoting sexual health” as one of the five
 59   II,     9.  3.  3    |         Assembly (WHO, 2004)~ ~Risky sexual behaviour is directly linked
 60   II,     9.  3.  3    |             groups for what concerns sexual health, with sexual debut
 61   II,     9.  3.  3    |         concerns sexual health, with sexual debut occurring most frequently
 62   II,     9.  3.  3    |     frequently at this life stage.~ ~Sexual behaviour changes in response
 63   II,     9.  3.  3    |           social norms, transporting sexual images from more liberal
 64   II,     9.  3.  3    |         Therefore, information about sexual behaviour is essential to
 65   II,     9.  3.  3    |             interventions to improve sexual health.~ ~Several EU Member
 66   II,     9.  3.  3    |              prevalence of high-risk sexual behaviours such as occasional
 67   II,     9.  3.  3    |              known about patterns of sexual behaviour in Europe; not
 68   II,     9.  3.  3    |         European Concerted Action on sexual behaviour and the risk of
 69   II,     9.  3.  3    |              analyses of key data on sexual behaviour from surveys carried
 70   II,     9.  3.  3    |              2006) analyzing data on sexual behaviour from 59 countries
 71   II,     9.  3.  3    |      publication of study on teenage sexual and reproductive behaviour
 72   II,     9.  3.  3    |      including five main indicators: sexual behaviour, teenage fertility,
 73   II,     9.  3.  3    |         based on national surveys on sexual behaviour and fertility
 74   II,     9.  3.  3    |       journals.~· Data from national sexual attitude and lifestyle surveys
 75   II,     9.  3.  3    |              about relationships and sexual behaviour. Countries and
 76   II,     9.  3.  3    |             included questions about sexual health, but these varied
 77   II,     9.  3.  3    |           Norway did not include any sexual health questions.~· According
 78   II,     9.  3.  3    |      countries included questions on sexual behaviour (European health
 79   II,     9.  3.  3    |      indicators Some of them concern sexual behaviour and are clearly
 80   II,     9.  3.  3    |       indicators ( ht ~ ~Majority of sexual behaviour surveys include
 81   II,     9.  3.  3    |      information useful in analysing sexual behaviour, such as: coital
 82   II,     9.  3.  3    |            sex education and advice, sexual experiences, contraception,
 83   II,     9.  3.  3    |              desire for children and sexual violence, however, due to
 84   II,     9.  3.  3    |            are susceptible to error. Sexual behaviour survey might suffer
 85   II,     9.  3.  3    |         analysis~ ~Mean age at first sexual intercourse~ ~Almost everywhere
 86   II,     9.  3.  3    |          Almost everywhere in Europe sexual activity begins for most
 87   II,     9.  3.  3    |              The lowest mean age for sexual initiation among women was
 88   II,     9.  3.  3    |              males, the age at first sexual intercourse did not vary
 89   II,     9.  3.  3    |             Southern countries, male sexual initiation was very stable
 90   II,     9.  3.  3    |              who had had their first sexual intercourse at or after
 91   II,     9.  3.  3    |            Young people who have had sexual intercourse, 15 year olds~ ~
 92   II,     9.  3.  3    |      year-olds who report having had sexual intercourse in the countries
 93   II,     9.  3.  3    |              boys declare having had sexual intercourse (England, Finland,
 94   II,     9.  3.  3    |           boys than girls having had sexual intercourse at the age of
 95   II,     9.  3.  3    |           women graduates have their sexual initiation later than early
 96   II,     9.  3.  3    |             between the age of first sexual intercourse and marriage
 97   II,     9.  3.  3    |              the EU have more casual sexual relationships than in the
 98   II,     9.  3.  3    |              group have had a single sexual partner in their life so
 99   II,     9.  3.  3    |        Czech Republic, the number of sexual partners during lifetime
100   II,     9.  3.  3    |              For example, occasional sexual intercourses seem more frequent
101   II,     9.  3.  3    |            increase in the number of sexual partners and the prevalence
102   II,     9.  3.  3    |           condom for the most recent sexual intercourse is higher for
103   II,     9.  3.  3    |        condom the last time they had sexual intercourse ranges from
104   II,     9.  3.  3    |             condom during their last sexual intercourse,15-year-olds~ ~
105   II,     9.  3.  3    |      reported using it in their last sexual relation (Amaro et al, 2004).
106   II,     9.  3.  3    |              use; however, in casual sexual contacts a condom was used
107   II,     9.  3.  3    |        population allowed to compare sexual attitudes and behaviour
108   II,     9.  3.  3    |         increased safe sex practice, sexual behaviour among adolescents
109   II,     9.  3.  3    |                The increase in risky sexual behaviours may be a consequence
110   II,     9.  3.  3    |              lower priority given to sexual health on political agendas
111   II,     9.  3.  3    |         excessive drinking and risky sexual behaviour (Thompson et al,
112   II,     9.  3.  3    |      increase in risky behaviours.~ ~Sexual orientation~ ~The socially
113   II,     9.  3.  3    |              only 0.9% said they had sexual relations exclusively with
114   II,     9.  3.  3    |                  Similar patterns of sexual behaviour of gay men in
115   II,     9.  3.  3    |      According to the Irish Study of Sexual Health and Relationships,
116   II,     9.  3.  3    |               2006).~ ~Predictors of sexual behaviour~ ~Marital status
117   II,     9.  3.  3    |              strongest predictor for sexual behaviour and health outcomes
118   II,     9.  3.  3    |        single is associated to risky sexual behaviour and adverse health
119   II,     9.  3.  3    |      prominence of the school in the sexual education of the young and
120   II,     9.  3.  3    |            2006). In Italy the first sexual intercourse at a very young
121   II,     9.  3.  3    |          policies~ ~Obviously, risky sexual behaviours may be very dangerous
122   II,     9.  3.  3    |     infectious diseases. Analysis of sexual behaviour in the era of
123   II,     9.  3.  3    |            chapters. Data related to sexual abuse and violence is included
124   II,     9.  3.  3    |          supported the Resolution on Sexual and Reproductive Health
125   II,     9.  3.  3    |              does not increase risky sexual behaviour (Kirby et al,
126   II,     9.  3.  3    |            and to delay the onset of sexual activity. Techniques used
127   II,     9.  3.  3    |         present situation with risky sexual behaviour including modernisation
128   II,     9.  3.  3    |          broad approach of promoting sexual behaviour that is likely
129   II,     9.  3.  3    |                 Most of the national sexual health policies in the western
130   II,     9.  3.  3    |          based on the principle that sexual behaviour belongs to the
131   II,     9.  3.  3    |            the process for promoting sexual health (WHO, 2006a):~ ~
132   II,     9.  3.  3    |        adolescents who have ever had sexual intercourse, subdivided
133   II,     9.  3.  3    |          contraception at first/last sexual intercourse, subdivided
134   II,     9.  3.  3    |           last year;~· age mixing in sexual relationships (women aged
135   II,     9.  3.  3    |              or more years older);~· sexual orientation;~· sexual orientation
136   II,     9.  3.  3    |                sexual orientation;~· sexual orientation of partner/partners.~ ~
137   II,     9.  3.  3    |           understand what is driving sexual behaviour rather than collecting
138   II,     9.  3.  3    |             and attitudes related to sexual behaviour. However, recently
139   II,     9.  3.  3    |              of behaviours. However, sexual habits are strongly regulated
140   II,     9.  3.  3    |              and the modification of sexual behaviours to improve sexual
141   II,     9.  3.  3    |         sexual behaviours to improve sexual health has proven to be
142   II,     9.  3.  3    |                The increase of risky sexual behaviour has been high
143   II,     9.  3.  3    |     individuals, and improvements in sexual behaviour depend on people
144   II,     9.  3.  3    |                With the diversity of sexual behaviour, a range of preventive
145   II,     9.  3.  3    |     strategies are needed to protect sexual health. Interventions encouraging
146   II,     9.  3.  3    |              remain a cornerstone of sexual health promotion, but evidence
147   II,     9.  3.  3    |          developments~ ~Diversity of sexual behaviour needs to be respected
148   II,     9.  3.  3    |              Instead of issue-driven sexual health agenda, it is necessary
149   II,     9.  3.  3    |              is necessary to promote sexual behaviours that are likely
150   II,     9.  3.  3    |     responsible, satisfying and safe sexual life, which is positively
151   II,     9.  3.  3    |           dynamics largely determine sexual health in Europe calls for
152   II,     9.  3.  3    |           comparative indicators for sexual behaviour and reproductive
153   II,     9.  3.  3    |          epidemics. Incorporation of sexual health as an integrated
154   II,     9.  3.  3    |            surveys using comparative sexual health indicators will enable
155   II,     9.  3.  3    |       comprehensive approach towards sexual health. There are many publications
156   II,     9.  3.  3    |        suggesting ways of monitoring sexual behaviour. However, most
157   II,     9.  3.  3    |            of unsafe sex rather than sexual behaviour in general.~ ~
158   II,     9.  3.  3    |            perception, attitudes and sexual behaviour in Portugal. Int
159   II,     9.  3.  3    |            Spira A, Field J. (1995): Sexual behaviour in HIV epidemiology:
160   II,     9.  3.  3    |           Sandfort T, et al (1994) : Sexual behaviour of gay and bisexual
161   II,     9.  3.  3    |           Bozon M, Kontula O (1998): Sexual initiation and gender :
162   II,     9.  3.  3    |              in the 20th century. In Sexual behaviour and HIV/AIDS in
163   II,     9.  3.  3    |       without other major changes in sexual behaviour among the general
164   II,     9.  3.  3    |     Parliament (2003): Resolution on sexual and reproductive health
165   II,     9.  3.  3    |            Erens B (2001): Measuring sexual behaviour: methodological
166   II,     9.  3.  3    |               in Finnish) (Trends in sexual behaviour in Finland and
167   II,     9.  3.  3    |   Haavio-Mannila E, Kontula O (2003) Sexual trends in the Baltic area.
168   II,     9.  3.  3    |              K (2005): Assessment of sexual behaviour, sexual attitudes,
169   II,     9.  3.  3    |      Assessment of sexual behaviour, sexual attitudes, and sexual risk
170   II,     9.  3.  3    |     behaviour, sexual attitudes, and sexual risk in Sweden (1989-2003).
171   II,     9.  3.  3    |           Bajos N, Sandroft T (1998) Sexual Behaviour and HIV/AIDS in
172   II,     9.  3.  3    |               Erens B, et al (2001): Sexual behaviour in Britain: partnerships,
173   II,     9.  3.  3    |               2004): A comparison of sexual behaviour and attitudes
174   II,     9.  3.  3    |             HIVeducation programs on sexual behaviours of youth in developing
175   II,     9.  3.  3    |              Increased condom use at sexual debut in the general population
176   II,     9.  3.  3    |            2006): The Irish Study of Sexual Health and Relationships.
177   II,     9.  3.  3    | Haavio-Mannila E, Hemminki E (2007): Sexual health among young adults
178   II,     9.  3.  3    |        Interventions for encouraging sexual lifestyles and behaviours
179   II,     9.  3.  3    |            knowledge, attitudes, and sexual behaviour in relation to
180   II,     9.  3.  3    |          alcohol use and risk-taking sexual behaviours in a large behavioural
181   II,     9.  3.  3    |              and risk factors in the sexual behaviour and sexual approach
182   II,     9.  3.  3    |             the sexual behaviour and sexual approach oh inhabitants
183   II,     9.  3.  3    |         first intercourse, number of sexual partners and contraception)
184   II,     9.  3.  3    |           fenton KA, Fiels J (2001): Sexual behaviour in Britain: early
185   II,     9.  3.  3    |             Patel D, Bajos N (2006): Sexual behaviour in context: a
186   II,     9.  3.  3    |          perspective. Lancet Series: Sexual and Reproductive Health;
187   II,     9.  3.  3    |             ISSHR~The Irish Study of Sexual Health and Relationships~
188   II,     9.  4.  2    |          older people (e.g. smoking, sexual health etc.) The EU co-funded
189   II,     9.  5.  1    |              and encounter high risk sexual intercourse and violence
190   II,     9.  5.  3    |           take the form of physical, sexual or psychological abuse.
191   II,     9.  5.  3    |                    A. information of Sexual Violence in various Countries~
192   II,     9.  5.  3    |             of women have reported a sexual assault as adults6.4%
193   II,     9.  5.  3    |              26.5% of women reported sexual abuse by a stranger after
194   II,     9.  5.  3    |              18.2% of women reported sexual abuse by a stranger after
195   II,     9.  5.  3    |          women have reported rape or sexual assault on at least one
196   II,     9.  5.  3    |            women victims of physical/sexual violence by present partner~·
197   II,     9.  5.  3    |         stress, oppressive racial or sexual discrimination and other
198   II,     9.  5.  4    |       children who are vulnerable to sexual exploitation.~ Reference
199   II,     9.  5.  4    |           Abusive behaviours such as sexual violence, rape and female
200  III,    10.  1.  1    |              prevalence of high-risk sexual behaviour. Condom use can
201  III,    10.  1.  1    |         excessive drinking and risky sexual behaviour (Thompson et al,
202  III,    10.  1.  3    |          alcohol use and risk-taking sexual behaviors in a large behavioral
203  III,    10.  2.  1    |              studies of domestic and sexual violence. The relationship
204  III,    10.  2.  1    |                      10.2.1.4. Risky sexual behaviour~ ~Information
205  III,    10.  2.  1    |     behaviour~ ~Information on risky sexual behaviour is provided in
206  III,    10.  2.  1    |            more general framework of sexual health.~ ~
207  III,    10.  4.  2    |              also be considered that sexual reproduction of clones gives
208  III,    10.  4.  2    |          attributed to the fact that sexual reproduction includes a
209  III,    10.  6.  3    |           Safety Survey are robbery, sexual incidents, assaults and
210  III,    10.  6.  3    |     incidents, assaults and threats. Sexual incidents are divided into
211  III,    10.  6.  3    |           incidents are divided into sexual assault and what victims
212  III,    10.  6.  3    |        victims describe as offensive sexual behaviour. Assaults and
213  III,    10.  6.  3    |            therefore hard to draw.~ ~Sexual offences: Measuring sexual
214  III,    10.  6.  3    |           Sexual offences: Measuring sexual incidents is extremely difficult
215  III,    10.  6.  3    |              what is an unacceptable sexual behaviour may differ across
216  III,    10.  6.  3    |              less inclined to report sexual incidents, thereby deflating
217  III,    10.  6.  3    |          male respondents recorded a sexual incident. Somewhat higher
218  III,    10.  6.  3    |           error around the rates for sexual offences are therefore larger
219  III,    10.  6.  3    |              remarkable decreases in sexual incidents compared to previous
220  III,    10.  6.  3(45)|          touch or assault others for sexual reasons in a really offensive
221  III,    10.  6.  3    |        Prevalence rates for robbery, sexual offences of women, assaults
222  III,    10.  6.  3    |           and threats~ ~Physical and sexual assaults occur daily, though
223  III,    10.  6.  3    |          forms (physical, mental and sexual), occurs in different environments (
224   IV,    12.  5        |            and physical activity and sexual health, and on addiction-related
225   IV,    12. 10        |               National/Regional~ Yes~Sexual behaviour~High~Regional~
226   IV,    12. 10        |           Narkoen ud af byen~http da~Sexual behaviour~ High~ ~ Numerous
227   IV,    12. 10        |         programs and interventions).~Sexual behaviour~High priority~ ~
228   IV,    12. 10        |            substance abuse~ High~ ~ ~Sexual behaviour~High for HIV and
229   IV,    12. 10        |          More precisely, it supports sexual health education programs
230   IV,    12. 10        | schoolchildren have been educated in sexual health.~Recently the Hellenic
231   IV,    12. 10        |        cannabis~and traffic security~Sexual behaviour~ High for HIV
232   IV,    12. 10        |                plan against AIDS and sexual communicable diseases: prevention
233   IV,    12. 10        |        modifications (1999; 2006).~ ~Sexual behaviour~ High~ Main regulation
234   IV,    12. 10        |      national Public Health Strategy~Sexual behaviour~High for HIV and
235   IV,    12. 10        |             for other things~ Law on Sexual and Reproductive Health~
236   IV,    12. 10        |               High~ National level~ ~Sexual behaviour~ High~National
237   IV,    12. 10        |       context so as in what concerns sexual health agenda. In February
238   IV,    12. 10        |              strategy~Media campaign~Sexual behaviour~High for HIV,
239   IV,    12. 10        |              and medical care policy~Sexual violence and coercion~Reported
240   IV,    12. 10        |       violence and coercion~Reported sexual crime (all ages), n/100,
241   IV,    12. 10        |        Republic of Croatia 2006-2012~Sexual behaviour~ Intermediate~
242   IV,    13.  6.  2    |             the onset of puberty and sexual maturity, many children
243   IV,    13.  8        |          drug prevention, preventive sexual and reproductive health,
244  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0    |    self-management~sensitization~sex~sexual~sexually transmitted~shigella~