Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  4        |                  including mainstreaming gender equality and solidarity
  2    I,     2.  5        |               2005). These issues have a gender dimension, since women are
  3    I,     2.  6        |                  EUGLOREH Countries, per gender, in 2006.~ ~In the EU25
  4   II,     4.  1        |                European level (EU25) per gender: life expectancy (LE), Healthy
  5   II,     4.  1        |               between men and women, the gender gaps.~ ~Table 4.1.1. Life
  6   II,     4.  1        |               Union (EU25), in 2005, per gender.~ ~The number of Healthy
  7   II,     4.  1        |          limitations. Therefore, the HLY gender gap in favour of women appears
  8   II,     4.  1        |          limitations. Therefore, the HLY gender gap in favour of women at
  9   II,     4.  1        |                50, as well as at 65, the gender gaps in the number of expected
 10   II,     4.  1        |     heterogeneity between genders. These gender differences may be a result
 11   II,     4.  1        |              birth (LE0 ) in the EU27 by gender. The table also displays
 12   II,     4.  1        |                   from 1995 to 2005, per gender~ ~Over the 10 year period
 13   II,     4.  1        |           thereby reducing the longevity gender gap by 1 year (Table 4.1.
 14   II,     4.  1        |               Union (EU25), in 2005, per gender~ ~Table 4.1.4 underlines
 15   II,     4.  1        |                  1995 and in 2005 and by gender. The US data come from the
 16   II,     4.  1        |              Japan in 1995 and 2005, per gender~ ~Table 4.1.5 shows firstly
 17   II,     4.  1        |           Secondly, the table shows that gender gaps range from 5.2 years
 18   II,     5.  1.  1    |          lifestyle. Others, such as age, gender and genetics cannot. Moreover,
 19   II,     5.  1.  1    |                  analysis including age, gender, smoking habits, family
 20   II,     5.  4.  7    |        demographic characteristics (age, gender);~· clinical characteristics (
 21   II,     5.  4.  8    |                 and prevention seen in a gender perspective. Ugeskr Laeger.
 22   II,     5.  5.Int    |               identical symptoms. Female gender is also a significant predictor
 23   II,     5.  5.Int(11)|                    2002): Mental Health: Gender Bias, Social Position, and
 24   II,     5.  5.Int(12)|                     Hallstrom, T. (2001) Gender differences in mental health.
 25   II,     5.  5.Int(12)|          Härenstam and G. Lindberg (eds) Gender Inequalities in Health (
 26   II,     5.  5.  1    |                Psychological distress by gender and age~ ~Logistic regression
 27   II,     5.  5.  1    |                 in order to control age, gender, marital status, employment
 28   II,     5.  5.  1    |           Logistic regression identified gender, age, marital status, employment
 29   II,     5.  5.  1    |                000 people by country and gender in Europe are presented
 30   II,     5.  5.  1    |                   per 100 000 people) by gender in Europe~ ~The stability
 31   II,     5.  5.  1    |              accidents per age group and gender in Europe~ ~As regards to
 32   II,     5.  5.  1    |               Europe~ ~As regards to the gender, in both 15-64 and 65+ age
 33   II,     5.  5.  2    |          lifestyle. Others, such as age, gender and genetics cannot. Moreover,
 34   II,     5.  5.  2    |                risk factors such as age, gender or genetic vulnerability
 35   II,     5.  5.  3    |              year-olds. Adolescents show gender differences in dissatisfaction
 36   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 there was no significant gender difference, as well as no
 37   II,     5.  5.  3    |               population, independent of gender (with the exception of an
 38   II,     5.  5.  3    |               certain incidence figures (gender, migrants, urbanicity).
 39   II,     5.  5.  3    |               Organization (WHO) (1997): Gender differences in the epidemiology
 40   II,     5.  5.  3    |                 distribution by country, gender, age, and incidence distribution
 41   II,     5.  5.  3    |            selected EUGLOREH Contries by gender~ ~Table 5.5.3.5.3. Prevalence (
 42   II,     5.  5.  3    |                HRQoL to that of age- and gender matched general population).
 43   II,     5.  5.  3    |        demographic characteristics (age, gender, education, disability level)
 44   II,     5.  6.  3    |                include older age, female gender, longer disease duration
 45   II,     5.  6.  3    |                include older age, female gender, longer disease duration
 46   II,     5.  6.  3    |                Apart from age and female gender, the major determinants
 47   II,     5.  6.  4    |               disorders by diagnosis and gender. Norway, 1994. (European
 48   II,     5.  6.  4    |               disorders by diagnosis and gender. Norway 1997.~ ~Use of health
 49   II,     5.  6.  6    |           studies of differences in age, gender, social class, and pain
 50   II,     5.  6.  6    |                JF, Tellnes G (1998): The gender gap in musculoskeletal-related
 51   II,     5.  7.  2    |              least the date of birth and gender of each patient starting
 52   II,     5.  7.  3    |          modified by adjustment for age, gender, and diabetes. Age and GFR
 53   II,     5.  7.  3    |               2005 period per age group, gender and cause of renal failure.~ ~
 54   II,     5.  7.  3    |                  1992-2005 by age group, gender and cause of renal failure.~ ~
 55   II,     5.  7.  3    |                  patients per age group, gender and cause of renal failure.~ ~
 56   II,     5.  7.  4    |                  affected by the age and gender distribution in the general
 57   II,     5.  7.  7    |             metabolic syndrome differ by gender: evidence from NHANES III.
 58   II,     5.  8.  3    |                  at 26.1%, regardless of gender, and at stage II or higher
 59   II,     5.  8.  3    |                the disease and potential gender bias in its diagnosis, the
 60   II,     5.  8.  3    |                 2,699) in 1998 with age, gender, time, and practice-matched
 61   II,     5.  8.  4    |                  analysis including age, gender, smoking habits, family
 62   II,     5.  8.  4    |                 associated with the male gender (Siafakas et al, 1995).
 63   II,     5.  8.  4    |             which proved that the female gender was significantly affected
 64   II,     5.  9.  4    |                  9.6. Standardized (age, gender) prevalence of sensitization
 65   II,     5.  9.  4    |            tested and standardized (age, gender) prevalence of sensitization
 66   II,     5. 10.  2    |            little information on sex and gender differences has been collected,
 67   II,     5. 10.  6    |              groups, taking into account gender and geographical area, as
 68   II,     5. 10.  7    |                   2006): Incorporating a gender dimension in food allergy
 69   II,     6.  3.  4    |            Tubercolosis cases by age and gender~ ~ ~ ~Figure 6.A1.3 Combined
 70   II,     7.  3.  2    |                   EU27~ ~When looking at gender and age, injuries affect
 71   II,     7.  3.  5    |                 intentional self-harm by gender in the EU27 whereas more
 72   II,     7.  3.  5    |                 intentional self-harm by gender in the EU27~ ~The majority
 73   II,     7.  3.  5    |              risk factors vary with age, gender and ethnic group. Risk factors
 74   II,     7.  4.  6    |              risk factors vary with age, gender, sexual orientation and
 75   II,     7.  4.  7    |                to violence;~· Addressing gender inequality, and adverse
 76   II,     7.  5        |             attention should be given to gender aspects and to the “seven
 77   II,     8.  2.  1    |               risks were associated with genderwomen were at increased
 78   II,     8.  2.  1    |             patients of the same age and gender in the general population.
 79   II,     9            |             TRENDS FOR DIFFERENT AGE AND GENDER~POPULATION GROUPS~This chapter
 80   II,     9            |                 active than boys and the gender gap increases with age.
 81   II,     9            |               factors for stroke are not gender dependant. Although strokes
 82   II,     9.  2.  3    |           similar patterns, although the gender difference is smaller. There
 83   II,     9.  2.  3    |      cross-national variation and marked gender difference in levels of
 84   II,     9.  2.  3    |               among girls than boys. The gender gap widens with age (Fig.
 85   II,     9.  2.  4    |                 active than boys and the gender gap increases with age.
 86   II,     9.  2.  6    |              data on children, including gender segregated research, can
 87   II,     9.  3.  1    |            concerning violence and other gender issues not dealt with in
 88   II,     9.  3.  1    |           revascularization. Reasons for gender differences are thought
 89   II,     9.  3.  1    |               risk for CHD, which is not gender dependant.~ ~Venous thromboembolism.
 90   II,     9.  3.  1    |                the Global Strategy lists gender as one factor to be taken
 91   II,     9.  3.  1    |                  is as far as mention to gender goes. Though the 2002 WHO
 92   II,     9.  3.  1    |                  a symptom of underlying gender inequality (Brown, 2003).
 93   II,     9.  3.  1    |              acquiring an infection. The gender stereotypes that accompany
 94   II,     9.  3.  1    |                  fracture per region and gender. Amongst women, the incidence
 95   II,     9.  3.  1    |                men, older age and female gender would appear to be risk
 96   II,     9.  3.  1    |               factors for stroke are not gender dependant. Although strokes
 97   II,     9.  3.  1    |                given to the imbedding of gender equity into policy and planning.
 98   II,     9.  3.  1    |                 research. The process of gender and health impact assessments
 99   II,     9.  3.  1    |                    2002): Mental HealthGender Bias, Social Position, and
100   II,     9.  3.  1    |              Policies with an Integrated Gender Perspective: Mainstreaming
101   II,     9.  3.  1    |           Perspective: Mainstreaming the Gender Perspective into the Health
102   II,     9.  3.  1    |            Medicine; 6: 3: 49.~ ~Men and Gender Equality Policy. Helsinki (
103   II,     9.  3.  1    |                 of armed conflict on the gender gap in life expectancy.
104   II,     9.  3.  1    |            mental wellbeing: encouraging gender sensitivity. Mental Health
105   II,     9.  3.  1    |                Journal of Men’s Health & Gender 3(2): 139-151~ ~WHO (2000)
106   II,     9.  3.  1    |                 GENACIS (2005): Alcohol, gender and drinking problems: perspectives
107   II,     9.  3.  1    |           Disability Process project~GIA~Gender Impact Assessment~GP~General
108   II,     9.  3.  3    |              many factors including age, gender, religion, family, friends,
109   II,     9.  3.  3    |                 Currie et al, 2004). The gender differences are wide. Among
110   II,     9.  3.  3    |                 40.4% in England. From a gender perspective, there are two
111   II,     9.  3.  3    |                to report condom use. The gender difference can sometimes
112   II,     9.  3.  3    |                    Sexual initiation and gender : a cross-cultural analysis
113   II,     9.  4.  1    |                  with lower birth rates, gender, the impact of ageing on
114   II,     9.  4.  1    |        experience, such as social class, gender and ethnicity, impact the
115   II,     9.  4.  2    |                 stratified by age group, gender and income levels, which
116   II,     9.  4.  3    |          affected than aged individuals. Gender differences have been highlighted,
117   II,     9.  4.  5    |         conditions (co-morbidities). The gender difference in life expectancy
118   II,     9.  5.  1    |                   9.5.1. Introduction~ ~“Genderrefers to the social construction
119   II,     9.  5.  1    |                  between men and women, “genderdescribes roles, responsibilities,
120   II,     9.  5.  1    |               components contributing to gender differences in health and
121   II,     9.  5.  1    |                  women have, but also to gender inequality in social, educational,
122   II,     9.  5.  1    |                 be due to differences in gender norms about risk-taking
123   II,     9.  5.  1    |                protection. The described gender differences contribute to
124   II,     9.  5.  1    |                  still a lack of data on gender differences in health and
125   II,     9.  5.  1    |       differences in health and changing gender relations which have profound
126   II,     9.  5.  1    |                 medical conditions. More gender disaggregated research is
127   II,     9.  5.  2    |                 Enhance understanding of gender differences in the use of
128   II,     9.  5.  2    |               base to help determine key gender health priorities ;~- Inform
129   II,     9.  5.  2    |                Inform the development of gender sensitive policy;~- Provide
130   II,     9.  5.  2    |             basis for actions to address gender inequalities in health outcomes.~ ~
131   II,     9.  5.  3    |             Table 9.5.3. Suicide Rates~ ~Gender differences are apparent
132   II,     9.  5.  3    |                 users of inpatient care. Gender bias can also occur in the
133   II,     9.  5.  3    |               and their outcomes. Female gender is a significant predictor
134   II,     9.  5.  3    |                    Individuals of either gender with low levels of education
135   II,     9.  5.  3    |           policies, practices which deny gender equality, or which tolerate
136   II,     9.  5.  3    |             educational level as well as gender roles and expectations.
137   II,     9.  5.  3    |                 There are some important gender differences in smoking behaviour.
138   II,     9.  5.  3    | physical activity in the last 7 days per gender~ ~Table 9.5.9. Time spent
139   II,     9.  5.  3    | physical activity in the last 7 days per gender~ ~Current evidence suggests
140   II,     9.  5.  3    |               and all age groups and the gender gap increases with age.
141   II,     9.  5.  3    |            Rowntree Foundation, 2006).~ ~Gender differences have been observed
142   II,     9.  5.  4    |                  Reports which Impact on Gender Issues~ ~· The future of
143   II,     9.  5.  4    |                 the point of view of the gender perspective. Reference A6-0402/
144   II,     9.  5.  4    |               mental health for the EUGender discrimination in health
145   II,     9.  5.  4    |                  women’s empowerment and gender equality, including those
146   II,     9.  5.  4    |      inequalities that put them at risk. Gender inequalities in health need
147   II,     9.  5.  4    |                  a symptom of underlying gender inequality. The implementation
148   II,     9.  5.  4    |               the social construction in gender indicators;~· To seek simple
149   II,     9.  5.  4    |              which examine documents for gender balance;~· The review and
150   II,     9.  5.  4    |              policy documents to include gender proofing methodology and
151   II,     9.  5.  4    |                  Aortic Aneurism (2008), Gender Equality Duty (England and
152   II,     9.  5.  4    |                  Key EU Commissioners.~ ~Gender proof research~ ~Entrenched
153   II,     9.  5.  4    |           medical science to evidence of gender difference. Negative attitudes
154   II,     9.  5.  4    |        difference. Negative attitudes to gender issues and resistance to
155   II,     9.  5.  4    |        resistance to the introduction of gender aware practice are renowned
156   II,     9.  5.  4    |         subjected to gender-proofing and Gender Equality Impact Assessment
157   II,     9.  5.  4    |                    The implementation of gender mainstreaming is a core
158   II,     9.  5.  4    |                  of diseases relevant to gender research are cardiovascular
159   II,     9.  5.  4    |          depression and schizophrenia;~ ~Gender mainstreaming~ ~Doyal (1998)
160   II,     9.  5.  4    |                that the mainstreaming of gender would require a shift in
161   II,     9.  5.  4    |                 States towards embedding gender equity into policy and planning.
162   II,     9.  5.  4    |             monitoring and evaluation of gender awareness, where analysis
163   II,     9.  5.  4    |       development and economic growth.~ ~Gender Equality Impact Assessment~ ~
164   II,     9.  5.  4    |        Assessment~ ~In 2001, a series of Gender Equality Impact Assessment (
165   II,     9.  5.  4    |                Framework Programme (FP5) Gender Watch System, to examine
166   II,     9.  5.  4    |           examine earlier Programmes for gender awareness. On their release
167   II,     9.  5.  4    |                studies, and consequently gender mainstreaming became a prime
168   II,     9.  5.  4    |                   In 2006 a EU report on gender equity asked special attention
169   II,     9.  5.  5    |                   Future developments~ ~“Genderneeds to be operated as
170   II,     9.  5.  5    |           recognized. It is adamant that gender equality and the empowerment
171   II,     9.  5.  5    |               Conclusions of 2.6.2006 on gender equality and women’s health.~ ~
172   II,     9.  5.  6    |                   2002): Mental Health: ‘Gender Bias, Social Position, and
173   II,     9.  5.  6    |              Outdoor Play EnvironmentsGender. Culture and learning. Stockholm
174   II,     9.  5.  6    |                 Prus S, Walter V (2004): Gender differences in health: a
175   II,     9.  5.  6    |              Policies with an Integrated Gender Perspective: Mainstreaming
176   II,     9.  5.  6    |           Perspective: Mainstreaming the Gender Perspective into the Health
177   II,     9.  5.  6    |               and Health at Work (2003): Gender issues in safety and health -
178   II,     9.  5.  6    |               Men’s Health Forum (2005): Gender mainstreaming and good health
179   II,     9.  5.  6    |                     Hällström T (2001): ‘Gender differences in mental health’,
180   II,     9.  5.  6    |        differences in mental health’, in Gender Inequalities in Health:
181   II,     9.  5.  6    |                Sciences and Biomedicine: Gender Sensitive Ways of Doing
182   II,     9.  5.  6    |              What research reveals about gender, home care and caregiving'
183   II,     9.  5.  6    |           Education Unit (PDHPE) (2007): Gender and physical activity for
184   II,     9.  5.  6    |            Hamber K, Johansson E (2006): Gender perspective in medicine:
185   II,     9.  5.  6    |                aged 1544. J Mens Health Gender, 3: 139-151.~ ~WHO/GENACIS (
186   II,     9.  5.  6    |                 GENACIS (2005): Alcohol, gender and drinking problems: perspectives
187   II,     9.  5.  7    |               completed project)~GENACIS~Gender, Alcohol and Culture: An
188  III,    10.  1.  1    |                 of personal involvement, gender and age (Veenstra et al,
189  III,    10.  1.  1    |                  and modified by age and gender (Brady and Sonne, 1999;
190  III,    10.  2.  1    |        characteristics, such as culture, gender, age, social class, criminal
191  III,    10.  2.  1    |               the EU are young age, male gender, living in an urban area
192  III,    10.  2.  1    |                  race or ethnicity, age, gender or general health status.
193  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 BMI adjusted for age and gender that correspond to BMI of
194  III,    10.  5.  2    |                 little difference in the gender distribution, while for
195  III,    10.  5.  2    |              However, there are striking gender differences for individual
196  III,    10.  5.  2    |                  2.7. Life expectancy by gender in urban and rural settings
197  III,    10.  5.  2    |            rural settings).~Although the gender difference is much stronger
198  III,    10.  5.  3    |                risks factors at work per gender~ ~A lack of job control
199  III,    10.  5.  3    |                risks factors at work per gender.~ ~Table 10.5.3.14. Physical
200  III,    10.  5.  3    |           mortality. These issues have a gender dimension, since women are
201  III,    10.  5.  3    |               employment status, income, gender and race, as well as by
202  III,    10.  6.  1    |         emotional and practical support. Gender, personality and educational
203  III,    10.  6.  1    |                close friends of the same gender~ ~Figure 10.6.3. 15-year
204  III,    10.  6.  1    |                close friends of the same gender~ ~Friendships offer acceptance
205  III,    10.  6.  1    |                close friends of the same gender in more than 50% of cases,
206  III,    10.  6.  1    |                close friends of the same gender than girls (Currie et al.,
207  III,    10.  6.  3    |                 women in countries where gender equality is less advanced
208  III,    10.  6.  3    |                to violence;~· Addressing gender inequality, and adverse
209   IV,    12.  3        |               promotion and promotion of gender equalityopportunity,
210   IV,    12.  5        |               including those related to gender differences, in order to
211   IV,    12.  5        |               between the genders. These gender differences may be a result
212   IV,    12. 10        |              High~National/Regional~ Yes~Gender issues~High ~National/Regional~
213   IV,    12. 10        |               2010 http df~Poverty~ ~ ~ ~Gender issues~ ~ ~2004: Young and
214   IV,    12. 10        |            fostered by the department of gender equality on young people
215   IV,    12. 10        |                  and social commitment~ ~Gender issues~High priority~2nd
216   IV,    12. 10        |           vulnerable groups~ in society.~Gender issues~High~ ~ The Women'
217   IV,    12. 10        |                and works with the HSE on gender mainstreaming health policies.
218   IV,    12. 10        |              National Health System.~ ~ ~Gender issues~ high~o Law 1329/
219   IV,    12. 10        |           adjustment to the principle of gender equality.~o Law 1414/1984:
220   IV,    12. 10        |               equality.~o Law 1414/1984: Gender equality in the labour market
221   IV,    12. 10        |                  General Secretariat for Gender Equality developed TV spots
222   IV,    12. 10        |                 informational sources on gender issues are available through
223   IV,    12. 10        |                  for care access:~htt ~ ~Gender issues~ intermediate~ ~Specialised
224   IV,    12. 10        |                  related health, age and gender health issues…each objective
225   IV,    12. 10        |                 EC Regulation 178/2002~ ~Gender issues~ High~Project for
226   IV,    12. 10        |          national Public Health Strategy~Gender issues~ intermediate~ ~ ~
227   IV,    12. 10        |                 High~ National level~ ~ ~Gender issues~ High~Health sector
228   IV,    12. 10        |             relevance of putting sex and gender issues into health agenda.
229   IV,    12. 10        |            policies begin to integrate a gender sensitive approach, namely
230   IV,    12. 10        |                  to the need to diminish gender iniquities in health.~ ~
231   IV,    12. 10        |            Project about Health, Sex and Gender) intend to attend jointly
232   IV,    12. 10        |                  reportHealth, Sex and Gender: Facts, Representations
233   IV,    12. 10        |             Health Interview Survey in a gender perspective (results are
234   IV,    12. 10        |                  programs for students~ ~Gender issues~ intermediate~ Law
235   IV,    12. 10        |            intermediate~ Law 340/07/2006 Gender equality~ ~Work-related
236   IV,    12. 10        |              Youth policy~Child policy~ ~Gender equality~Gender equality
237   IV,    12. 10        |                 policy~ ~Gender equality~Gender equality index~Domain of
238   IV,    12. 10        |              Welfare Act~Foster Care Act~Gender issues~ Intermediate~ At
239   IV,    12. 10        |          Intermediate~ At national level~Gender Equity Act~Work-related
240   IV,    13.  4        |                of non-discrimination and gender equality and its mainstreaming
241  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0    |            gastroenteritis~gastroschisis~gender~genders~genital~geriatric~