Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  9       |              very dependent on human behaviour and the quality of health
  2    I,     3.  1.  0(1)|             when comparing fertility behaviour in successive years or to
  3   II,     5.  1.  3   |      organizational information, and behaviour related to health and illness.
  4   II,     5.  5.  1   |             risk for future suicidal behaviour and completed suicide (e.g.
  5   II,     5.  5.  1   |              health and care-seeking behaviour.~ ~The data derived from
  6   II,     5.  5.  1   |             5.1.3. Lifetime suicidal behaviour in some mood and anxiety
  7   II,     5.  5.  1   |              the biology of suicidal behaviour. Psychiatr Clin North Am.
  8   II,     5.  5.  1   |              et al. (2004). Suicidal behaviour in Europe - Results from
  9   II,     5.  5.  1   |        Multicentre Study on Suicidal Behaviour. Göttingen: Hogrefe and
 10   II,     5.  5.  3   |            in press).~ ~HBSC (Health Behaviour in School Aged Children)
 11   II,     5.  5.  3   |              2003).~The HBSC (Health Behaviour in School Aged Children)
 12   II,     5.  5.  3   |           dieting and weight control behaviour is not clear, because the
 13   II,     5.  5.  3   |         emotions; thereby, unhealthy behaviour may cause diseases such
 14   II,     5.  5.  3   |    Nutritional and Physical activity Behaviour of Children and Adolescents,
 15   II,     5.  5.  3   |            health in context. Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (
 16   II,     5.  5.  3   |      Information Council~HBSC~Health Behaviour in School Aged Children~
 17   II,     5.  5.  3   |           the reluctant help seeking behaviour when first symptoms emerge
 18   II,     5.  5.  3   |             dangerous and that their behaviour is unpredictable.~Research
 19   II,     5.  5.  3   |           intervention and cognitive behaviour therapy. Psychol Med 32(
 20   II,     5.  5.  3   |              repetitive, ritualistic behaviour, which must be of an elaborate
 21   II,     5.  5.  3   |    communication, and/or stereotyped behaviour patterns or interest, but
 22   II,     5.  5.  3   |           stereotyped alterations in behaviour and reflecting the neural
 23   II,     5.  5.  3   |              of consciousness and/or behaviour, which may explain the possibility
 24   II,     5.  5.  3   |           may reflect confounding or behaviour associated with smoking
 25   II,     5.  6.  3   |       emotional instability and pain behaviour. Occupational factors clearly
 26   II,     5. 11.  5   |             at changing the public’s behaviour to avoid excessive sun exposure,
 27   II,     5. 14.  3   |        important component of social behaviour in the ageing population.
 28   II,     5. 14.  5   |         lifelong oral health related behaviour as well as beliefs and attitudes.
 29   II,     5. 14.  5   |       life-style and quality of life behaviour in relation to oral health
 30   II,     6.  3.  6   |          spread. Changes in consumer behaviour (and, consequently, in the
 31   II,     7.  4.  6   |              of depression. Suicidal behaviour has a large number of underlying
 32   II,     7.  5       |            well as by regulating the behaviour through legislation, supervision &
 33   II,     8.  2.  1   |             by deficits in ‘adaptive behaviour’, defined as age appropriate
 34   II,     9           |       Commission, 2003). Poor health behaviour in a mother can influence
 35   II,     9           |              2).~ ~Sexual health and behaviour. Sexual behaviour is an
 36   II,     9           |         health and behaviour. Sexual behaviour is an important determinant
 37   II,     9           |            the consequences of risky behaviour (WHO, 2005c). Sexually transmitted
 38   II,     9.  2.  1   |        childhood and adolescence are behaviour related, and therefore preventable.
 39   II,     9.  2.  2   |            that compiles data on the behaviour of young people with regard
 40   II,     9.  2.  2   |              Web link – ww ~ ~Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (
 41   II,     9.  2.  2   |              patterns of risk taking behaviour. It is the period of onset
 42   II,     9.  2.  2   |              relevance as individual behaviour when reporting on a particular
 43   II,     9.  2.  3   |    child-on-child violence.~ ~Sexual behaviour: General information on
 44   II,     9.  2.  3   |        General information on sexual behaviour in adolescents can be found
 45   II,     9.  2.  3   |            the consequences of risky behaviour, can make them less likely
 46   II,     9.  2.  3   |            aggressive and delinquent behaviour as well as of alcohol, tobacco
 47   II,     9.  2.  3   |     definition. Data from the Health Behaviour in a School-aged Children (
 48   II,     9.  2.  4   |       Commission, 2003). Poor health behaviour in a mother can influence
 49   II,     9.  2.  4   |              2).~ ~Sexual health and behaviour. Sexual behaviour is an
 50   II,     9.  2.  4   |         health and behaviour. Sexual behaviour is an important determinant
 51   II,     9.  2.  4   |            the consequences of risky behaviour (WHO, 2005c). Sexually transmitted
 52   II,     9.  2.  5   |    nutritional and physical activity behaviour of children, commissioned
 53   II,     9.  2.  6   |        education, and health-related behaviour are major child health determinants.
 54   II,     9.  2.  6   |              enduring health-related behaviour, are heavily influenced
 55   II,     9.  2.  7   |            health in context. Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (
 56   II,     9.  2.  7   |            health in context: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children.
 57   II,     9.  3.  1   |         substance abuse, anti-social behaviour and self harm (White, 2006).
 58   II,     9.  3.  3   |             of sexual health. Sexual behaviour usually analysed from adolescent
 59   II,     9.  3.  3   |            WHO, 2004)~ ~Risky sexual behaviour is directly linked to other
 60   II,     9.  3.  3   |            this life stage.~ ~Sexual behaviour changes in response to both
 61   II,     9.  3.  3   |             information about sexual behaviour is essential to the design
 62   II,     9.  3.  3   |             about patterns of sexual behaviour in Europe; not all countries
 63   II,     9.  3.  3   |           Concerted Action on sexual behaviour and the risk of HIV infection
 64   II,     9.  3.  3   |       analyses of key data on sexual behaviour from surveys carried out
 65   II,     9.  3.  3   |             analyzing data on sexual behaviour from 59 countries worldwide
 66   II,     9.  3.  3   |              sexual and reproductive behaviour and its consequences in
 67   II,     9.  3.  3   |              main indicators: sexual behaviour, teenage fertility, contraceptive
 68   II,     9.  3.  3   |           national surveys on sexual behaviour and fertility conducted
 69   II,     9.  3.  3   |              presented in the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (
 70   II,     9.  3.  3   |             relationships and sexual behaviour. Countries and regions mainly
 71   II,     9.  3.  3   |         included questions on sexual behaviour (European health interview
 72   II,     9.  3.  3   |          Some of them concern sexual behaviour and are clearly defined
 73   II,     9.  3.  3   |                   Majority of sexual behaviour surveys include both men
 74   II,     9.  3.  3   |           useful in analysing sexual behaviour, such as: coital frequency
 75   II,     9.  3.  3   |         susceptible to error. Sexual behaviour survey might suffer more
 76   II,     9.  3.  3   |              2007).Studies comparing behaviour over time have found that
 77   II,     9.  3.  3   |         compare sexual attitudes and behaviour at three different time
 78   II,     9.  3.  3   |            safe sex practice, sexual behaviour among adolescents in the
 79   II,     9.  3.  3   |            drinking and risky sexual behaviour (Thompson et al, 2005).
 80   II,     9.  3.  3   |           Similar patterns of sexual behaviour of gay men in eight European
 81   II,     9.  3.  3   |                 Predictors of sexual behaviour~ ~Marital status is the
 82   II,     9.  3.  3   |       strongest predictor for sexual behaviour and health outcomes in comparison
 83   II,     9.  3.  3   |           associated to risky sexual behaviour and adverse health outcomes
 84   II,     9.  3.  3   |         diseases. Analysis of sexual behaviour in the era of HIV, hepatitis
 85   II,     9.  3.  3   |            not increase risky sexual behaviour (Kirby et al, 2006). Systematic
 86   II,     9.  3.  3   |           and more likely to lead to behaviour change, than that conveyed
 87   II,     9.  3.  3   |          situation with risky sexual behaviour including modernisation
 88   II,     9.  3.  3   |         approach of promoting sexual behaviour that is likely to protect
 89   II,     9.  3.  3   |            the principle that sexual behaviour belongs to the sphere of
 90   II,     9.  3.  3   |    understand what is driving sexual behaviour rather than collecting data
 91   II,     9.  3.  3   |              collecting data on post behaviour reporting.~ ~Surveys historically
 92   II,     9.  3.  3   |          attitudes related to sexual behaviour. However, recently collected
 93   II,     9.  3.  3   |         differences in attitudes and behaviour around sexuality in Europe
 94   II,     9.  3.  3   |             increase of risky sexual behaviour has been high on the agenda
 95   II,     9.  3.  3   |           and improvements in sexual behaviour depend on people being comfortable
 96   II,     9.  3.  3   |              the diversity of sexual behaviour, a range of preventive strategies
 97   II,     9.  3.  3   |   interventions to change individual behaviour and show increased effectiveness
 98   II,     9.  3.  3   |   developments~ ~Diversity of sexual behaviour needs to be respected in
 99   II,     9.  3.  3   |    comparative indicators for sexual behaviour and reproductive health
100   II,     9.  3.  3   |            ways of monitoring sexual behaviour. However, most of the indicators
101   II,     9.  3.  3   |        unsafe sex rather than sexual behaviour in general.~ ~
102   II,     9.  3.  3   |     perception, attitudes and sexual behaviour in Portugal. Int J STD&AIDS
103   II,     9.  3.  3   |              Field J. (1995): Sexual behaviour in HIV epidemiology: Comparative
104   II,     9.  3.  3   |       Kontula O (2003): Reproductive behaviour of young Europeans. Vol.
105   II,     9.  3.  3   |             T, et al (1994) : Sexual behaviour of gay and bisexual men
106   II,     9.  3.  3   |              20th century. In Sexual behaviour and HIV/AIDS in Europe:
107   II,     9.  3.  3   |            health in context. Health Behaviour in School-aged Children(
108   II,     9.  3.  3   |              major changes in sexual behaviour among the general population
109   II,     9.  3.  3   |              2001): Measuring sexual behaviour: methodological challenges
110   II,     9.  3.  3   |           Finnish) (Trends in sexual behaviour in Finland and neighbouring
111   II,     9.  3.  3   |          2005): Assessment of sexual behaviour, sexual attitudes, and sexual
112   II,     9.  3.  3   |             Sandroft T (1998) Sexual Behaviour and HIV/AIDS in Europe:
113   II,     9.  3.  3   |              B, et al (2001): Sexual behaviour in Britain: partnerships,
114   II,     9.  3.  3   |               A comparison of sexual behaviour and attitudes of healthy
115   II,     9.  3.  3   |        Assessing risk and protective behaviour through a general health
116   II,     9.  3.  3   |     knowledge, attitudes, and sexual behaviour in relation to HIV/AIDS
117   II,     9.  3.  3   |           risk factors in the sexual behaviour and sexual approach oh inhabitants
118   II,     9.  3.  3   |               Fiels J (2001): Sexual behaviour in Britain: early heterosexual
119   II,     9.  3.  3   |               Bajos N (2006): Sexual behaviour in context: a global perspective.
120   II,     9.  3.  3   |            International~HBSC~Health Behaviour in School-aged Children
121   II,     9.  5.  1   |           and norms about acceptable behaviour for women and men in a specific
122   II,     9.  5.  1   |       genders. Differences in health behaviour (e.g. tobacco use), risk
123   II,     9.  5.  3   |            in dieting/weight control behaviour and can also be more prone
124   II,     9.  5.  3   |          cross-cultural variation in behaviour when people drink. Drinking
125   II,     9.  5.  3   |          when people drink. Drinking behaviour is related to cultural beliefs
126   II,     9.  5.  3   |        gender differences in smoking behaviour. About nine out of 10 tobacco
127   II,     9.  5.  3   |           The WHO/HBSC report Health Behaviour in School-aged Children
128   II,     9.  5.  3   |              girls, as their smoking behaviour may influence future health.
129   II,     9.  5.  3   |             an impact on patterns of behaviour and access to resources,
130   II,     9.  5.  3   |          cultural factors or learned behaviour. Clear activity preferences
131   II,     9.  5.  4   |   health-influencing experiences and behaviour need to be reflected in
132   II,     9.  5.  6   |            health in context: Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (
133   II,     9.  5.  7   |      International Study~HBSC~Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (
134  III,    10.  1       |                   Violence and other behaviour against society~ ~ ~ ~ ~
135  III,    10.  1       |             during life; 2) personal behaviour (or lifestyle); 3) the conditions
136  III,    10.  1       |       through related changes in our behaviour in response to those factors.
137  III,    10.  1.  1   |          creating barriers to health behaviour (Green and Potvin, 2004).~ ~
138  III,    10.  1.  1   |             influence on the smoking behaviour of their children: Children
139  III,    10.  1.  1   |      important interacting lifestyle behaviour and is linked to a whole
140  III,    10.  1.  1   |            critically influence risk behaviour (Green and Potvin, 2004) (
141  III,    10.  1.  1   |           both healthy and unhealthy behaviour (Babor et al, 1987; Hart,
142  III,    10.  1.  1   |              drinking and aggressive behaviour has been shown in many studies,
143  III,    10.  1.  1   |         social anxiety) and suicidal behaviour (Blow et al, 2004; Burke
144  III,    10.  1.  1   |            antisocial and drug-using behaviour is not sufficient yet (Velleman,
145  III,    10.  1.  1   |             more important than peer behaviour. Single-parent families,
146  III,    10.  1.  1   |           the development of healthy behaviour / behaviour change. In history,
147  III,    10.  1.  1   |   development of healthy behaviour / behaviour change. In history, the
148  III,    10.  1.  1   |       prevalence of high-risk sexual behaviour. Condom use can be challenged
149  III,    10.  1.  1   |            drinking and risky sexual behaviour (Thompson et al, 2005).
150  III,    10.  1.  3   |              Alcoholism and suicidal behaviour. A clinical overview. Acta
151  III,    10.  2.  1   |      interventions geared at smoking behaviour will determine the future
152  III,    10.  2.  1   |        Burden of Disease~HBSC~Health Behaviour in School-aged Children~
153  III,    10.  2.  1   |          Council of Europe)~· Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (
154  III,    10.  2.  1   |             for suicide and suicidal behaviour among both young people
155  III,    10.  2.  1   |    advertising on smoking and eating behaviour. It is difficult to study
156  III,    10.  2.  1   |            for a sustained effect on behaviour (Jones et al, 2007).~ ~In
157  III,    10.  2.  1   |             noise level and customer behaviour. Evaluation results from
158  III,    10.  2.  1   |              Other Drugs~HBSC~Health Behaviour among School Children~HBV~
159  III,    10.  2.  1   |               10.2.1.4. Risky sexual behaviour~ ~Information on risky sexual
160  III,    10.  2.  1   |          Information on risky sexual behaviour is provided in chapter 9.
161  III,    10.  2.  1   |        needed to improve oral health behaviour and attitudes especially
162  III,    10.  2.  1   |       heavily influenced by parental behaviour. The increased usage of
163  III,    10.  2.  1   |           can be achieved. Lifestyle behaviour that affects general health
164  III,    10.  2.  1   |             types of positive health behaviour, such as healthy eating
165  III,    10.  2.  1   |              and to estimate walking behaviour. Two versions (short and
166  III,    10.  2.  1   |               2004) and/or sedentary behaviour (de Almeida, 2004). Sedentariness
167  III,    10.  2.  1   |           complementary dimension of behaviour (WHO Regional Office for
168  III,    10.  2.  1   |            is available.~ ~b) Health behaviour in school-aged children
169  III,    10.  2.  1   |                This survey of health behaviour among young people aged
170  III,    10.  2.  1   |     different estimates of a certain behaviour (Pratt et al. 1999) so results
171  III,    10.  2.  1   |            ja terveys, kevät [Health behaviour andhealth among Finnish
172  III,    10.  2.  1   |     Institute.~ ~HBSC (2002): Health behaviour in school-aged children –
173  III,    10.  2.  1   |         energy balance. Physiology & Behaviour, 86(5):603–613.~ ~Peters
174  III,    10.  2.  1   |            health and health-related behaviour. In: Currie C et al., eds.
175  III,    10.  2.  1   |            health in context. Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (
176  III,    10.  2.  1   |             food preference and food behaviour (UFC-Que Choisir’s studies)
177  III,    10.  2.  1   |            that the effect on eating behaviour was less frequently assessed
178  III,    10.  2.  1   |             can influence purchasing behaviour, indicating that fiscal
179  III,    10.  2.  1   |            health in context. Health behaviour in school-aged children (
180  III,    10.  2.  1   |          SLAN): and the Irish health behaviour in school-aged children
181  III,    10.  2.  1   |     gyvensenos tyrimas, 2006 [Health behaviour among Lithuanian adult population,
182  III,    10.  2.  1   |          terveys, kevät 2006 [Health behaviour and health among the Finnish
183  III,    10.  2.  1   |          terviseuuring, 2004 [Health behaviour among Estonian adult population,
184  III,    10.  2.  1   |      paradumu pëtïjums, 2004 [Health behaviour among Latvian adult population,
185  III,    10.  2.  4   |        agents, nutrition or personal behaviour in relation to the causation
186  III,    10.  2.  5   |     formation of permanent models of behaviour. A multitude of research
187  III,    10.  3.  1   |             interference with social behaviour and speech communication,
188  III,    10.  4.  1   |         transportation and community behaviour on air quality and childhood
189  III,    10.  4.  2   |               environmental fate and behaviour; and~· ecotoxicology~ ~and
190  III,    10.  4.  2   |         metabolism studies, fate and behaviour in the environment and ecotoxicological
191  III,    10.  5.  1   |            infections.~ ~Residential behaviour~ ~The behaviour of the residents
192  III,    10.  5.  1   |          Residential behaviour~ ~The behaviour of the residents is a key
193  III,    10.  5.  1   |             et al, 2005). First, the behaviour of residents does actively
194  III,    10.  5.  1   |             allergens.~ ~Second, the behaviour of residents can enforce,
195  III,    10.  5.  1   |             exposures of residential behaviour are related to air pollution,
196  III,    10.  5.  1   |            to home accidentshuman behaviour and dwelling design / maintenance.
197  III,    10.  5.  1   |           levels of active transport behaviour: in Berlin, roughly one
198  III,    10.  5.  2   |   Urban-rural disparities in smoking behaviour in Germany. BMC Public Health
199  III,    10.  5.  3   |      migrants and immigrants - whose behaviour and attitudes are influenced
200  III,    10.  5.  3   |            well as by health-related behaviour and access to health services.
201  III,    10.  6.  0   |            of Health~HBSC~The Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children~
202  III,    10.  6.  1   |            The HBSC study~The Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (
203  III,    10.  6.  1   |             or people with a strange behaviour (questioning the degree
204  III,    10.  6.  1   |               Acronyms~ ~HBSC~Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children~
205  III,    10.  6.  2   |              characteristics, health behaviour, social networks as well
206  III,    10.  6.  2   |           gradient of adverse health behaviour is found across the life
207  III,    10.  6.  3   |             and threats are forms of behaviour which have very bad consequences
208  III,    10.  6.  3   |         describe as offensive sexual behaviour. Assaults and threats can
209  III,    10.  6.  3   |            is an unacceptable sexual behaviour may differ across countries,
210  III,    10.  6.  3   |             or people with a strange behaviour (questioning the degree
211   IV,    11.  1.  5   |             on physician prescribing behaviour (Hetlevik et al, 2000),
212   IV,    11.  1.  5   |         financial incentives and the behaviour of individual doctors, particularly
213   IV,    11.  1.  5   |              incentives on physician behaviour include observations that
214   IV,    11.  1.  5   |          rules designed to influence behaviour must be understood and accepted
215   IV,    11.  1.  6   |      incentives that affect provider behaviour and the efficiency, equity
216   IV,    11.  1.  6   |            method on the physician’s behaviour (Chaix-Couturier et al,
217   IV,    11.  6.  5   |        system of payment: effects on behaviour of primary care physicians.
218   IV,    12.  1       |     individual choices and voluntary behaviour changes on the one hand
219   IV,    12.  2       |         learn to live with diabetes. Behaviour is based upon knowledge,
220   IV,    12.  2       |    advertising on smoking and eating behaviour. It is difficult to study
221   IV,    12.  2       |            for a sustained effect on behaviour. ~ ~In general, public information
222   IV,    12.  2       |             noise level and customer behaviour. Evaluation results from
223   IV,    12.  5       |            health and health-related behaviour of the population, and on
224   IV,    12. 10       |        National/Regional~ Yes~Sexual behaviour~High~Regional~ Yes~Personal
225   IV,    12. 10       |            ud af byen~http da~Sexual behaviour~ High~ ~ Numerous campaigns
226   IV,    12. 10       |      consumption as well as drinking behaviour of subgroups is monitored
227   IV,    12. 10       |           and interventions).~Sexual behaviour~High priority~ ~ Federal
228   IV,    12. 10       |        measures with focus on health behaviour (e. g. information concerning
229   IV,    12. 10       |     substance abuse~ High~ ~ ~Sexual behaviour~High for HIV and transmission
230   IV,    12. 10       |              traffic security~Sexual behaviour~ High for HIV and abortion~
231   IV,    12. 10       | modifications (1999; 2006).~ ~Sexual behaviour~ High~ Main regulation for
232   IV,    12. 10       |        Public Health Strategy~Sexual behaviour~High for HIV and intermediate
233   IV,    12. 10       |              National level~ ~Sexual behaviour~ High~National level~ ~During
234   IV,    12. 10       |       strategy~Media campaign~Sexual behaviour~High for HIV, STI and abortion~
235   IV,    12. 10       |             Croatia 2006-2012~Sexual behaviour~ Intermediate~ At national
236   IV,    13.  5       |           cognition, functioning and behaviour. Alzheimer’s disease accounts
237   IV,    13.  7.  3   |      medicine, virology, and brain & behaviour, significant public health
238   IV,    13.  7.  5   |            health and health-related behaviour of the population, diseases
239  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0   |        barrier~barriers~bathing~beds~behaviour~behaviours~Belgium~benzene~