Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  4    |             disease, many cancers, and injury.~ ~These inequalities in
  2   II,     5.  1.  1|          disease, cancer and violence (injury and poisoning) within total
  3   II,     5.  1.  1|          disease, cancer and violence (injury and poisoning) within total
  4   II,     5.  5.  1|             suicide and self-inflicted injury per 100 000 population.
  5   II,     5.  6.  3|           transient, such as following injury; recurrent as is often the
  6   II,     7.Acr    |         Comprehensive View of European Injury Data~DALY~Disability Adjusted
  7   II,     7.Acr    |               European Association for Injury Prevention and Safety Prevention~
  8   II,     7.Acr    |         Related Health Problems~IDB~EU Injury Data Base~ILO~International
  9   II,     7.Acr    |            Road Users~VIP~Violence and Injury prevention~WHO~World Health
 10   II,     7.  1    |              health actions to enhance injury surveillance, injury prevention
 11   II,     7.  1    |           enhance injury surveillance, injury prevention and safety promotion:~ ~
 12   II,     7.  1    |         released its Recommendation on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion
 13   II,     7.  1    |                Governmental Experts on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion,
 14   II,     7.  1    |        available information about the injury burden of health, underlining
 15   II,     7.  1    |                HDD (Apollo), IDB.~ ~An injury is a bodily lesion resulting
 16   II,     7.  1    |              and the appearance of the injury is short. Injuries are often
 17   II,     7.  1    |                   Therefore, effective injury prevention also needs appropriate
 18   II,     7.  1    |             external factors. Detailed injury data make it possible to
 19   II,     7.  1    |           prevention measures, monitor injury trends, prioritise issues,
 20   II,     7.  1    |               examples of how detailed injury data has guided the improvement
 21   II,     7.  1    |         several times.~ ~Traditionally injury prevention in EU Member
 22   II,     7.  1    |              and justice etc. Although injury prevention programmes in
 23   II,     7.  1    |         provides a general overview of injury mortality and morbidity
 24   II,     7.  2    |            identify factors related to injury. These are collectively
 25   II,     7.  2    |                are collectively called injury surveillance systems. Several
 26   II,     7.  2    |                 coming from particular injury sectors e.g. police recorded
 27   II,     7.  2.  1|                 ICD-10:~- Chapter XIX: Injury, poisoning and certain other
 28   II,     7.  2.  1|                 ICD-9:~- Chapter 17 on INJURY AND POISONING (800-999)~-
 29   II,     7.  2.  1|   Classification of external causes of injury and poisoning (E800-E999)~ ~
 30   II,     7.  2.  1|            basis for developing the EU Injury Database (IDB) Coding Manual.~htt ~ ~
 31   II,     7.  2.  3|        accidents resulting in death or injury (no statistics on damage -
 32   II,     7.  2.  6|                              7.2.6. EU Injury Database (IDB)~ ~The core
 33   II,     7.  2.  6|              The core survey of the EU Injury Database is based on Accident
 34   II,     7.  2.  6|          database.~htt ~ ~The IDB “All Injury Coding Manual” is mostly
 35   II,     7.  2.  6|               is comparable across all injury sectors.~ ~
 36   II,     7.  2.  7|                                 7.2.7. Injury Statistics Portal for Mortality
 37   II,     7.  2.  7|               for Mortality Data~ ~The Injury Statistics Portal for mortality
 38   II,     7.  2.  9|             complement the research on injury statistics.~ ~Experts at
 39   II,     7.  2.  9|               European Association for Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion)
 40   II,     7.  2.  9|             contact point for European injury analyses. htt ~ ~The EuroCost
 41   II,     7.  2.  9|        comparison and summarisation of injury figures is rather difficult.~ ~ ~ ~
 42   II,     7.  3    |            yearly average based on the injury data of the latest available
 43   II,     7.  3.  1|          hospital data of the European Injury Database (IDB) with routine
 44   II,     7.  3.  1|                by different sectors of injury prevention. Projections
 45   II,     7.  3.  1|            consequences (prevalence of injury disability) of injuries
 46   II,     7.  3.  1|              for a comparison of major injury outcomes per injury sector,
 47   II,     7.  3.  1|              major injury outcomes per injury sector, providing added
 48   II,     7.  3.  1|                health and cross-sector injury prevention. For example:~ ~·
 49   II,     7.  3.  1|               an important setting for injury surveillance.~ ~Table 7.
 50   II,     7.  3.  2|          disabled people and unchanged injury morbidity rates. Nevertheless,
 51   II,     7.  3.  2|                someone dies of a fatal injury in the EU27. This adds up
 52   II,     7.  3.  2|              Lithuania has the highest injury fatality rate in the EU
 53   II,     7.  3.  2|              The risk of dying from an injury in Lithuania is over five
 54   II,     7.  3.  2|           country which has the lowest injury fatality rate for this time
 55   II,     7.  3.  2|                in the EU27 reduced its injury mortality rate to the same
 56   II,     7.  3.  2|             Figure 7.1).~ ~Figure 7.1. Injury death rates and injury deaths
 57   II,     7.  3.  2|                 Injury death rates and injury deaths per country, EU27~ ~
 58   II,     7.  3.  2|                for about two thirds of injury deaths (68%) and intentional
 59   II,     7.  3.  2|           lives than any other type of injury, 5% are of undetermined
 60   II,     7.  3.  2|              The risk of dying from an injury is almost twice as high
 61   II,     7.  3.  2|            twice as high for males (72 injury deaths per 100 000 males)
 62   II,     7.  3.  2|                 As a result, 66% of EU injury fatalities are male, 34%
 63   II,     7.  3.  2|             Figure 7.3).~ ~Figure 7.3. Injury deaths per 100 000 by sex
 64   II,     7.  3.  2|            Recent trends indicate that injury mortality in the 27 Member
 65   II,     7.  3.  2|                can be reported for all injury areas except for home and
 66   II,     7.  3.  2|                to save more lives from injury deaths and to accelerate
 67   II,     7.  3.  2|      accelerate the overall decline of injury mortality (Figure 7.4).~ ~
 68   II,     7.  3.  3|         average hospital stay after an injury is approximately 8 days,
 69   II,     7.  3.  4|           orientation for cross-sector injury prevention by linking the
 70   II,     7.  3.  4|             horizontal WHO approach to injury prevention (Figure 7.6).~ ~
 71   II,     7.  3.  4|             While the magnitude of the injury epidemic is alarming, the
 72   II,     7.  3.  4|                definition, a transport injury event is an incident involving
 73   II,     7.  3.  4|                device and resulting in injury. The transport area can
 74   II,     7.  3.  4|                future also from the EU Injury Database (IDB).~ ~According
 75   II,     7.  3.  4|            accidents per age group and injury severity~ ~Work place~ ~
 76   II,     7.  3.  4|             accidents in the available injury registers is not without
 77   II,     7.  3.  4|          account for about 18% of this injury sector (Figure 7.14).~ ~
 78   II,     7.  3.  4|                activity at the time of injury~ ~Injury surveillance in
 79   II,     7.  3.  4|                at the time of injury~ ~Injury surveillance in the home
 80   II,     7.  3.  4|                turn hampers respective injury research. A prevention-oriented „
 81   II,     7.  3.  4|               prevention-oriented „all injurysurveillance system such
 82   II,     7.  3.  4|     surveillance system such as the EU Injury Database (IDB) is currently
 83   II,     7.  3.  4|    establishment of specially designed injury surveillance systems is
 84   II,     7.  3.  4|          development and evaluation of injury prevention strategies. The
 85   II,     7.  3.  4|                 and for the purpose of injury prevention in particular
 86   II,     7.  3.  4|                activity at the time of injury, type of sports, injury
 87   II,     7.  3.  4|                injury, type of sports, injury mechanism, place of occurrence
 88   II,     7.  3.  5|              of are the main causes of injury mortality in the EU27 (24%
 89   II,     7.  3.  5|                changed as the European Injury Database will also contain
 90   II,     7.  3.  5|             likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm,
 91   II,     7.  3.  5|           currently developed European Injury Database will in future
 92   II,     7.  4    |              The risk of dying from an injury is five times greater in
 93   II,     7.  4    |          Member State with the highest injury rate than in that with the
 94   II,     7.  4    |            inequalities in exposure to injury risks according to sex,
 95   II,     7.  4    |             lists also contain several injury indicators defining the
 96   II,     7.  4    |               the European standard of injury indicators.~(See: htt ~ ~
 97   II,     7.  4    |               indicators.~(See: htt ~ ~Injury surveillance systems in
 98   II,     7.  4    |              to calculate the standard injury indicators. Only some of
 99   II,     7.  4    |                resource allocation for injury prevention by setting priorities.
100   II,     7.  4    |              the various categories of injury, such as loss of productive
101   II,     7.  4    |                and impacts in terms of injury reduction.~ ~This has led
102   II,     7.  4    |               seven priority areas for injury prevention, analysed more
103   II,     7.  4.  1|              young ages (Figure 7.18). Injury is the leading cause of
104   II,     7.  4.  1|               death that occurs due to injury another 50 children and
105   II,     7.  4.  1|              hospital with a traumatic injury. Another 800 cases are treated
106   II,     7.  4.  1|                Governmental Experts on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion,
107   II,     7.  4.  1|       Promotion, 2008).~ ~Figure 7.18. Injury death in % of all deaths
108   II,     7.  4.  1|                the top three causes of injury deaths in children (Figure
109   II,     7.  4.  1|           actions should tackle severe injury hazards for preschool children
110   II,     7.  4.  1|             the most common causes for injury deaths (Figure 7.19.B).~ ~
111   II,     7.  4.  1|            Project is dealing with the injury risk of young people and
112   II,     7.  4.  1|               Experts on Accidents and Injury Prevention, 2007).~ ~Link
113   II,     7.  4.  2|         highest mortality rates due to injury are reported among people
114   II,     7.  4.  2|              65 or older die due to an injury in the EU27.~On average,
115   II,     7.  4.  2|            medical treatment due to an injury each year, which represents
116   II,     7.  4.  2|                Governmental Experts on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion,
117   II,     7.  4.  3|          contributors to the burden of injury. Each year, 45 000 people
118   II,     7.  4.  3|             run the highest risk of an injury (Figure 7.20; see also Figure
119   II,     7.  4.  3|                Governmental Experts on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion,
120   II,     7.  4.  3|        pedestrians were affected by an injury due to falls in transport
121   II,     7.  4.  4|            without risks: about 18% of injury related hospital admissions
122   II,     7.  4.  4|           activities that dominate the injury league are ball games such
123   II,     7.  4.  4|                Governmental Experts on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion,
124   II,     7.  4.  4|               practiced at the time of injury, EU27, 2003-2005~ ~The “
125   II,     7.  4.  4|               practiced at the time of injury by age group, 2003-2005~ ~
126   II,     7.  4.  4|               of physical exercise and injury prevention, should be combined
127   II,     7.  4.  4|                Governmental Experts on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion,
128   II,     7.  4.  4|                    A recent example of injury prevention in organised
129   II,     7.  4.  5|           safety to become involved in injury protection is obvious.~ ~
130   II,     7.  4.  5|                it is essential to have injury monitoring and reporting
131   II,     7.  4.  5|             identify the nature of the injury, the nature of the product
132   II,     7.  4.  5|               the circumstances of the injury. In the EU injury Data Base, (
133   II,     7.  4.  5|               of the injury. In the EU injury Data Base, (IDB) products
134   II,     7.  4.  5|                in the accident and the injury are identified and can provide
135   II,     7.  4.  6|                Actions in the field of injury prevention should therefore
136   II,     7.  5    |               situation is without any injury risk and for almost any
137   II,     7.  5    |             without any policy in some injury area; laws, policies and
138   II,     7.  5    |             States: the risk for fatal injury in one country can exceed
139   II,     7.  5    |           particular challenge is that injury prevention is a cross-cutting
140   II,     7.  5    |           species, only in rcent years injury prevention has also been
141   II,     7.  5    |                play a key role also in injury prevention as its mandate
142   II,     7.  5    |              of direct cost related to injury is absorbed by the health
143   II,     7.  5    |                prevention efforts. How injury prevention can be supported
144   II,     7.  5    |              for the implementation of injury prevention actions. Focal
145   II,     7.  5    |                are to be promoted, and injury and violence prevention
146   II,     7.  5    |   Capacity-building: The prevention of injury and violence requires knowledgeable
147   II,     7.  5    |            reports about the burden of injury, the analyses of the preventability
148   II,     7.  5    |               Member States (i) to put injury on the health policy agenda; (
149   II,     7.  5    |                agenda; (ii) to develop injury surveillance instruments; (
150   II,     7.  5    |             institutional capacity for injury prevention; (iv) to promote
151   II,     7.  5    |    Recommendation on the prevention of injury and the promotion of safety”
152   II,     7.  5    |                  Implement appropriate injury surveillance and reporting
153   II,     7.  5    |             pre-requisite for targeted injury prevention and monitoring
154   II,     7.  5    |          should develop representative injury surveillance instruments
155   II,     7.  5    |               monitor the evolution of injury risks. Special attention
156   II,     7.  5    |                plans or programmes for injury prevention and safety promotion:
157   II,     7.  5    |             the capacity to tackle the injury problem: Injury prevention
158   II,     7.  5    |             tackle the injury problem: Injury prevention should be implemented
159   II,     7.  5    |               reporting Community-wide injury data and information;~·
160   II,     7.  5    |            States for the inclusion of injury prevention knowledge into
161   II,     7.  5    |                Governmental Experts on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion,
162   II,     7.  5    |               the current situation of injury prevention in Europe, informs
163   II,     7.  5    |         violence).~ ~For what concerns injury surveillance, the following
164   II,     7.  5    |               WHO is to be mentioned: “Injury Surveillance Guidelines”
165   II,     7.  5    |                needs and approaches to injury data collection (Holder
166   II,     7.  5    |               a common methodology for injury information based on data
167   II,     7.  5    |       stakeholders with Community-wide injury information the Member States
168   II,     7.  5    |                invited to:~ ~· Provide injury data on fatalities (mortality
169   II,     7.  5    |        implementing a stable Community injury information system, according
170   II,     7.  5    |            product and service related injury risks;~· Encourage collaboration
171   II,     7.  5    |        statistical systems relevant to injury for providing a one access
172   II,     7.  5    |               level; and~· Disseminate injury information for advocacy
173   II,     7.  5    |                by hosting the European Injury Data Base IDB, by making
174   II,     7.  5    |           develop human capacities for injury prevention, basic knowledge
175   II,     7.  5    |               European Association for Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion “
176   II,     7.  5    |            networks) on all aspects of injury prevention and is working
177   II,     7.  5    |                 effective measures for injury prevention” and a “Who is
178   II,     7.  5    |      newsletter, a scientific journal (Injury Control and Safety Promotion)
179   II,     7.  5    |           Knowledge of ‘what works’ in injury prevention is needed to
180   II,     7.  5    |               European Association for Injury Prevention and Safety EUROSAFE
181   II,     7.  5    |              and effective measures in injury prevention where everybody
182   II,     7.  6    |          public health contribution to injury prevention will become more
183   II,     7.  6    |             still at an initial stage. Injury is a major health problem,
184   II,     7.  6    |              of health in the field of injury is ambitious. In fact, in
185   II,     7.  6    |   underestimated.~Inequalities also in injury risk and access to safety
186   II,     7.  6    |            involved. The challenge for injury prevention is to create
187   II,     7.  6    |             extent – for: establishing injury surveillance and information;
188   II,     7.  6    |      exchanging experiences; including injury prevention knowledge in
189   II,     7.  6    |              centres of excellence for injury prevention in Europe is
190   II,     7.  6    |                into consideration that injury represents the fourth leading
191   II,     7.  7    |             accidents by age group and injury severity (seriously injured
192   II,     7.  7    |                31 on the prevention of injury and the promotion of safety.
193   II,     7.  7    |          Athens University.~ ~European Injury Database (2005): Home and
194   II,     7.  7    |               M, Krug E (Eds.) (2001): Injury Surveillance guidelines.
195   II,     7.  7    |                Organization (WHO): The injury chart book: a graphical
196   II,     7.  7    |                Preventing Road Traffic Injury: A Public Health Perspective
197   II,     7.  7    |                Governmental Experts on Injury Prevention and Safety Promotion (
198   II,     7.  7    |             Organization (WHO) (2001): Injury surveillance guidelines.
199   II,     7.  7    |           World Report on Road Traffic Injury Prevention. Geneva, World
200   II,     8.  2.  1|             years. It can be caused by injury, disease, or a brain abnormality.
201   II,     8.  2.  1|               may include serious head injury, stroke, or certain infections
202   II,     8.  2.  3|            diseases, other diseases or injury (adult-onset hearing loss,
203   II,     9.  2.  1|            sports/recreational related injury, most of which affect boys
204   II,     9.  2.  3|               earlier in this section, injury is the greatest cause of
205   II,     9.  2.  3|              the result of intentional injury. Physical injuries are the
206   II,     9.  2.  3|               2007a).~ ~However, fatal injury is just the tip of the iceberg,
207   II,     9.  2.  3|              the totality of childhood injury cannot regularly be measured.~ ~
208   II,     9.  2.  3|              other forms than physical injury, however. A worrying situation
209   II,     9.  2.  3|              from physical assault and injury, to sexual abuse (both of
210   II,     9.  2.  6|                   Intentional harm and injury to children~The improvement
211   II,     9.  2.  7|               for Europe: Violence and Injury Prevention Available at:~www ~ ~
212   II,     9.  3.  1|    cardiovascular diseases, cancer and injury and poisoning (Table 9.3.
213   II,     9.  4.  3|              and institutionalisation. Injury to older people can be prevented
214   II,     9.  4.  3|           programmes promoting safety, injury prevention and actions against
215  III,    10.  2.  1|         Disease framework for disease, injury and risk factor quantification:
216  III,    10.  2.  1|          intentional and unintentional injury as primary causes of death
217  III,    10.  2.  1|              assault, violence related injury, homicide, family violence,
218  III,    10.  2.  5|            development can cause brain injury at doses much lower than
219  III,    10.  3.  2|            development can cause brain injury at doses much lower than
220  III,    10.  4.  4|           safety to become involved in injury protection is obvious.~ ~
221  III,    10.  4.  4|         essential to have an effective injury monitoring and reporting
222  III,    10.  4.  4|             identify the nature of the injury and that of the product
223  III,    10.  4.  4|               the circumstances of the injury. The EU Injury Data Base (
224  III,    10.  4.  4|    circumstances of the injury. The EU Injury Data Base (IDB) identifies
225  III,    10.  5.  1|               summary 20022004. AEU Injury Database (IDB) Available
226  III,    10.  5.  1|               European Communities~IDB~Injury Database~ISARE~Indicateurs
227  III,    10.  5.  3|               Occupational Disease and Injury Compensation Schemes. [on-line
228  III,    10.  6.  2|             many types of cancers, and injury.~ ~ ~The final report of
229  III,    10.  6.  3| under-addressed. Yet unlike a physical injury, this sort of violence may
230   IV,    11.  2.  1|             and providing treatment of injury). There seems to be a greater
231   IV,    11.  4    |                tomography in mild head injuryPharmaceuticals and biological
232   IV,    12.  1    |      information about these diseases.~Injury prevention~The aim was to
233   IV,    12.  2    |              assault, violence related injury, homicide, family violence,
234   IV,    12. 10    |       work-related ill-health~ ~Strain injury index~ ~Accumulated strain ~ ~
235  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|          inhalation~injecting~injuries~injury~in-patient~in-patients~insecticide~