Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    -,     1        |               In the meantime, civil society involvement and mobilization
  2    I,     2.  1    |           had fundamental effects on society, on population size and
  3    I,     2.  1    |        health is not only a cost for Society, but may largely contribute
  4    I,     2.  4    |              those at the margins of society and enhance social cohesion.
  5    I,     2.  4    |     including the most vulnerable in society. Sustained efforts will
  6    I,     2. 10.  2|       environmental risks (The Royal Society, 2004; NIOSH, 2006; Schulte
  7    I,     2. 10.  3|          which forms the information society component of the renewed
  8    I,     2. 10.  3|         digital economy (information society and enterprise: linking
  9    I,     2. 10.  3|          supported by DG Information Society under the EU Research Framework
 10    I,     2. 10.  3|      accessed through DG Information Society’s homepage.~ ~
 11    I,     2. 11    |     Luxembourg, Luxembourg~The Royal Society (2004): Nanoscience and
 12   II,     5.  1.  3|            care for patients and our society. Therapeutic patient education
 13   II,     5.  1.  4|         Participation of patients in society~ ~A person affected by a
 14   II,     5.  1.  4|       chronic disease is a member of society just like anybody else.
 15   II,     5.  1.  4|              to have his/her role in society regardless of his/her disease,
 16   II,     5.  2.Acr|          Blood Pressure~ESC~European Society of Cardiology~EU~European
 17   II,     5.  2.  1|       medications. The costs for our society are huge and are not only
 18   II,     5.  2.  2|          Thom et al, 1985), European Society of Cardiology (Sans et al,
 19   II,     5.  2.  2|           and come from the European Society of Cardiology, year 2000,
 20   II,     5.  2.  3|            collected by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) in 2004 (
 21   II,     5.  2.  4|            presented by the European Society of Cardiology during the
 22   II,     5.  2.  5|            organised by the European Society of Cardiology and the European
 23   II,     5.  2.  5|             Network and the European Society of Cardiology.~· The European
 24   II,     5.  2.  7|            Health 13: 55-60~European society of cardiology (2006): 2733
 25   II,     5.  2.  7|           Task force of the European Society of Cardiology on Cardiovascular
 26   II,     5.  3.Acr|             Registries~ESMO~European Society for Medical Oncology~EUROCHIP~
 27   II,     5.  3.  2|               MOSES II: The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO)
 28   II,     5.  3.  7|         sales.~· There is a need for society to take a long-term perspective
 29   II,     5.  4.  6|          including patient and civil society organisations, in finding
 30   II,     5.  5.Int|           isolated and excluded from society.~ ~Some Member States endeavour
 31   II,     5.  5.Int|              disability; Information society and media policy supported
 32   II,     5.  5.Int|        competences for the knowledge society) and through projects; as
 33   II,     5.  5.  3|           try to find their place in society and community. Instead of
 34   II,     5.  5.  3|      individuals, health systems and society. For example, nutrition
 35   II,     5.  5.  3|             on the individual and on society. It is indispensable to
 36   II,     5.  5.  3|               In Germany, the German Society of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy
 37   II,     5.  5.  3|          people, their families, and society. Therefore it is necessary
 38   II,     5.  5.  3|             a better attitude of the society towards epilepsy, patients
 39   II,     5.  5.  3|             all potentially involved society members. Epilepsy and any
 40   II,     5.  5.  3|            auspices of the German MS Society (Flachenecker et al, 2005; www ).
 41   II,     5.  5.  3|      workforce can be beneficial for society in general, as well as for
 42   II,     5.  5.  3|         Paper based on the German MS Society’s report “Mehr Lebensqualität,
 43   II,     5.  5.  3|          highly complementary.~Civil Society: the role of organizations
 44   II,     5.  5.  3|   participation of people with MS in society. Advances in medical research,
 45   II,     5.  5.  3|             MS on the individual and society are some of the issues on
 46   II,     5.  5.  3|              the strengthening of MS society foothold in the national
 47   II,     5.  5.  3|            German Multiple Sclerosis Society. Eur Neurol. 2006;56(2):
 48   II,     5.  5.  3|          National Multiple Sclerosis Society (USA): Advisory Committee
 49   II,     5.  5.  3|            substantial burden to the society. A recent review estimated
 50   II,     5.  5.  3|          family, health services and society, ii) the cost of PD markedly
 51   II,     5.  5.  3|            of Parkinson’s disease on society, family, and the individual.
 52   II,     5.  6.  3|         morbidity, mortality) and on society (socioeconomic)~ ~Back pain
 53   II,     5.  6.  3|           the individual and also on society due to its frequency and
 54   II,     5.  6.  3|              frequency, the costs to society are enormous. About 90%
 55   II,     5.  6.  4|    conditions have a major impact on society due to their frequency,
 56   II,     5.  6.  4|             consequences and for the society in terms of costs. Musculoskeletal
 57   II,     5.  6.  4|         impact on the individual and society is predicted to increase
 58   II,     5.  7.  1|         direct and indirect costs to society. CKD in the pre ESRD phase
 59   II,     5.  7.  5|           administered by the Danish Society of Nephrology since 2000.
 60   II,     5.  7.  5|             campaign of the Hellenic Society of Nephrology, particularly
 61   II,     5.  7.  5|             submitted by the Italian Society of Nephrology to the Ministry
 62   II,     5.  7.  5|            is organized by the Czech Society of Nephrology in cooperation
 63   II,     5.  8.Acr|             ERS~European Respiratory Society~FEV1~forced expiratory volume
 64   II,     5.  8.  2|              by European Respiratory Society and European Lung Foundation.~-
 65   II,     5.  8.  3|             of mild British Thoracic Society (BTS)-COPD was 5.3%, moderate
 66   II,     5.  8.  3|           days (European respiratory Society, 2003). In EU15, 41 300
 67   II,     5.  8.  3|       annually (European Respiratory Society, 2003).~ ~ ~The total costs
 68   II,     5.  8.  5|             by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and the European Respiratory
 69   II,     5.  8.  5|             the European Respiratory Society (ERS) (Celli et al, 2004),
 70   II,     5.  8.  5|             the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Lung
 71   II,     5.  8.  5|           ELF) (European Respiratory Society, 2003). This publication
 72   II,     5.  8.  7|     References~ ~ ~American Thoracic Society (2003) American Thoracic
 73   II,     5.  8.  7|              2003) American Thoracic Society Statement: Occupational
 74   II,     5.  8.  7|             2003): American Thoracic Society Statement: Occupational
 75   II,     5.  8.  7|                 European Respiratory Society (ERS) (2003). Chronic Obstructive
 76   II,     5.  9. FB|              the allergenic care for society as a whole.~ ~
 77   II,     5.  9.  2|              by European Respiratory Society and European Lung Foundation;~-
 78   II,     5.  9.  3|            of the allergenic care to society as a whole.~ ~The total
 79   II,     5.  9.  3|            imposed by the disease on society is represented by lost work
 80   II,     5.  9.  5|            costs of allergic care to society as a whole.~ ~Secondary
 81   II,     5. 11.  4|         borne by patients as well as society. Small changes in the way
 82   II,     5. 11.  6|           consumer awareness and the society’s attitudes towards people
 83   II,     5. 13    |         impose an economic burden on society through increased medical
 84   II,     6.  3.  1|             of pandemics, no part of society and no country is immune.
 85   II,     6.  3.  3|             approach these groups in society.~Immediately following diagnosis,
 86   II,     7.  4.  7|           and economic conditions in society (European Commission, 2006).~ ~
 87   II,     8.  1.  2|        people with disabilities into society can be collected by means
 88   II,     8.  1.  5|          living and participation in society. In the framework of its
 89   II,     8.  2.  2|           individual, the family and society. A major cause of low vision
 90   II,     9        |            according to their own or society's terms (Jarvis, 2004).
 91   II,     9        |            consumption of alcohol in society is related to different
 92   II,     9.  1.  1|         Network) and ESHRE (European Society for Human Reproduction and
 93   II,     9.  2.  1|              the community for which society as a whole carries a responsibility
 94   II,     9.  2.  1|   nevertheless remain dependant upon society for provision of services
 95   II,     9.  2.  1|      vulnerable group in that whilst society may express little understanding
 96   II,     9.  2.  2|     wellbeing and that of family and society. Yet this is the age-group
 97   II,     9.  2.  3|            the number of children in society with various types of impairing
 98   II,     9.  2.  3|              problems of violence in society. In the Young People’s Health
 99   II,     9.  2.  3|     unaddressed. Therefore, European society is not only unaware of how
100   II,     9.  2.  3|             Thus, the very future of society is threatened by the rapid
101   II,     9.  2.  3|               or pressures on modern society, the study identifies that
102   II,     9.  2.  4|            according to their own or society's terms (Jarvis, 2004).
103   II,     9.  2.  4|            consumption of alcohol in society is related to different
104   II,     9.  2.  5|            and promote their role in society. This supports the UN General
105   II,     9.  3.  1|           isolated and excluded from society (Mental Health Europe).~ ~
106   II,     9.  3.  1|             International Continence Society as involuntary loss of urine
107   II,     9.  3.  1|               The American Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guidelines (
108   II,     9.  3.  1|        Societies - the International Society of Andrology (ISA), the
109   II,     9.  3.  1|              ISA), the International Society for the Study of Ageing
110   II,     9.  3.  3|         regulated in virtually every society, and the modification of
111   II,     9.  4.  1|           healthcare systems and the society itself.~ ~Ageing is an individual
112   II,     9.  4.  3|          surgery (Geriatric Medicine Society, 2002). Risk factors for
113   II,     9.  4.  3|       programmes (Geriatric Medicine Society, 2002).~ ~Dementia: Assessment
114   II,     9.  4.  3|          control (Geriatric Medicine Society, 2002).~Dementia does not
115   II,     9.  4.  3|     incontinence (Geriatric Medicine Society, 2002).~ ~Disability: While
116   II,     9.  4.  3|       disability (Geriatric Medicine Society, 2002). Various measures
117   II,     9.  4.  5|          European Geriatric Medicine Society, 2002).~ ~Nursing home care.
118   II,     9.  4.  5|          European Geriatric Medicine Society, 2002).~ ~Specialist care
119   II,     9.  4.  5|          European Geriatric Medicine Society 2002).~ ~Medication and
120   II,     9.  4.  5|              greater contribution to society (WHO, 1999). Public polices
121   II,     9.  4.  5|              challenges of an ageing society, asked the Council - in
122   II,     9.  4.  5|              Well in the Information Societyinitiative. The plan is
123   II,     9.  4.  5|             to continue to engage in society with more accessible online
124   II,     9.  4.  5|            engage in the information society.~ ~Special Policies. EU,
125   II,     9.  4.  7|             Union Geriatric Medicine Society/Geriatric Medicine of the
126   II,     9.  4.  7|             of the British Menopause Society, Volume 9, Number 4, December
127   II,     9.  5.  3|        violence in a family may cost society 185 000 Finnish marks (about
128   II,     9.  5.  3|            according to their own or society's terms (Jarvis, 2004).
129   II,     9.  5.  3|              to meet the majority of society’s caring needs. Among those
130   II,     9.  5.  4|          resource allocations of our society. Nearly ten years later,
131   II,     9.  5.  6|            Shame and Pride. Body and Society, 6(1), pp. 13-28.~ ~Risberg
132  III,    10.  1    |              other behaviour against society~ ~ ~ ~ ~Individual health
133  III,    10.  1    |           conditions which shape the society, such as economic and labour
134  III,    10.  1    |             the role of women in the society.~ ~Figure 10.1.2 shows another
135  III,    10.  2.  1|          Moreover, smoking harms the society. In the EU, smoking is one
136  III,    10.  2.  1|           for the individual and the society~ ~Smoking harms virtually
137  III,    10.  2.  1|       morbidity and mortality on the society can be expressed as~ ~ ~ “
138  III,    10.  2.  1|             of governments and civil society. There is broad consensus
139  III,    10.  2.  1|                 European Respiratory Society (ERS) (2006): Smokefree
140  III,    10.  2.  1|        measures in a jurisdiction or society aimed at minimizing the
141  III,    10.  2.  1|           well integrated members of society, are becoming issues of
142  III,    10.  2.  1|             administration and civil society. The concurrence of physical
143  III,    10.  2.  1|         action by different parts of society to deal with the many aspects
144  III,    10.  2.  1|            involving all sections of society. Action in this area is
145  III,    10.  2.  1|     environment, employers and civil society. Likewise, the media is
146  III,    10.  2.  1|         review. Journal of the Royal Society of Health, 116:7-13.~ ~Gordon-Larsen
147  III,    10.  2.  1|         impose an economic burden on society through increased medical
148  III,    10.  2.  1|             administration and civil society.~ ~A very intensive activity
149  III,    10.  2.  1|         action by different parts of society to deal with the many aspects
150  III,    10.  2.  1|         Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 64:359-362.~ ~Gallus S,
151  III,    10.  2.  1|              559.~ ~German Nutrition Society, Austrian Nutrition Society,
152  III,    10.  2.  1|          Society, Austrian Nutrition Society, Swiss Society for Nutrition
153  III,    10.  2.  1|             Nutrition Society, Swiss Society for Nutrition Research,
154  III,    10.  2.  4|             the organised efforts of society (Brand, 2005). Policymakers
155  III,    10.  2.  4|             interests while enabling society to benefit from genomics (
156  III,    10.  3.  2|              of chemicals in today’s society, and thereby increase the
157  III,    10.  4.  3|              processes in the modern society have direct impacts on water
158  III,    10.  4.  4|              of chemicals in today’s society as well as to the increasing
159  III,    10.  5.  1|           and Transport, Information Society and Culture and Recreation.~htt ~ ~
160  III,    10.  5.  3|   individuals, organisations and the society in general.~ ~This interrelation
161  III,    10.  5.  3|             employers, employees and society to improve the health and
162  III,    10.  6.  1|       obligations and respect in the society -protects health.~ ~The
163  III,    10.  6.  1|               healthy, safe and just society with respect for fundamental
164  III,    10.  6.  2|           the poorest members of the society, although there is a gradient
165  III,    10.  6.  2|          morbidity across the entire society depending on low education,
166  III,    10.  6.  2|      unevenly distributed across the society, especially for what concerns
167  III,    10.  6.  2|            It draws the attention of society towards the social determinants
168  III,    10.  6.  2|            many different sectors of society, it is important to set
169  III,    10.  6.  2|       Participation and influence in society~2. Economic and social security~
170  III,    10.  6.  2|            of tobacco and alcohol, a society free from illicit drugs
171  III,    10.  6.  2|          factors, i.e. conditions in society and our surroundings that
172  III,    10.  6.  2|              and different levels of society (municipalities, county
173  III,    10.  6.  3|             other behaviours against society~ ~ ~
174  III,    10.  6.  3|           most vulnerable members of societychildren, the elderly,
175  III,    10.  6.  3|           and economic conditions in society. No single factor explains
176  III,    10.  6.  3|             of the data, and thus of society’s knowledge on the suffering
177  III,    10.  6.  3|  Organisation, and the International Society for the Prevention of Child
178   IV,    11.  1.  3|           system itself. The role of society and the contribution of
179   IV,    11.  1.  3|          so-called medicalization of society as first developed by Illich (
180   IV,    11.  2.  2|             the organized efforts of society. It differs from health
181   IV,    11.  3.  2|           cost of pharmaceuticals to society is highest in Germany, followed
182   IV,    11.  4    |            there is an international society for HTA (HTAi) (ww g) and
183   IV,    11.  5.  2| organizations on web:~ ~The European Society for Organ Transplantation (
184   IV,    11.  5.  2|                  British Organ Donor Society: htt Association of Organ
185   IV,    11.  5.  4|            the full participation of society for their development. There
186   IV,    11.  5.  4|           factors that influence the society’s perception of the benefit
187   IV,    11.  5.  6|            donors.~· The Information Society Directorate General is supporting
188   IV,    11.  6.  4|              the ‘medicalization’ of society and rising healthcare costs
189   IV,    12.  1    |       medicinal products~Information~Society~Audio visual~policy~Television
190   IV,    12.  1    |             advertising.~Information~Society~E-Health~Europe Action plan~
191   IV,    12.  2    |            organised by the European Society of Cardiology and the European
192   IV,    12.  2    |             Network and the European Society of Cardiology, the European
193   IV,    12.  2    |          including patient and civil society organisations finding solutions.~ ~
194   IV,    12.  2    |        measures in a jurisdiction or society aimed at minimizing the
195   IV,    12.  3    |           responsive to the needs of society. This proposal seeks to
196   IV,    12.  4    |          promote dialogue with civil society to raise public awareness
197   IV,    12.  4    |              and With DG information Society on e-Health and the reliability
198   IV,    12.  4    |             ec.europa.eu/information_society/activities/eten/index_en.
199   IV,    12.  4    |             ec.europa.eu/information_society/activities/einclusion/research/
200   IV,    12. 10    |   organisations. Together with civil society initiatives like “Agenda
201   IV,    12. 10    |                  Together with civil society organisations (e.g. Council
202   IV,    12. 10    |     protecting vulnerable groups~ in society.~Gender issues~High~ ~ The
203   IV,    12. 10    |             the empowerment of civil society.~Also, the HCDCP supports
204   IV,    12. 10    |      Co-operation with NGO and civil society in several initiatives.~ ~
205   IV,    12. 10    |              Co-operation with Civil society and the NGO working in this
206   IV,    12. 10    |         bodies and one for the civil society. Regional management groups
207   IV,    12. 10    |       Participation and influence in society~2. Economic and social security~
208   IV,    12. 10    |            of tobacco and alcohol, a society free from illicit drugs
209   IV,    12. 10    |                structural factors in society, people’s living conditions
210   IV,    12. 10    |              actors on all levels of society have responsibility for
211   IV,    13.Acr    |             the organized efforts of society. It differs from health
212   IV,    13.  2.  2|     malnutrition. In post-industrial society, life-style is responsible
213   IV,    13.  5    |              NGOs representing civil society, including European doctors
214   IV,    13.  6.  1|             the parent(s);~· Cost to society of health care and on occasions
215   IV,    13.  6.  2|              who need to rely on the society to ensure their needs are
216   IV,    13.  7.  5|      individual and the needs of the society. In a European context,
217   IV,    13.  8    |                          13.8. Civil society involvement and mobilization~ ~
218   IV,    13.  8    |            The engagement with civil society may profoundly affect the
219   IV,    13.  8    |         several reasons:~ ~The Civil Society has not yet been fully recognised
220   IV,    13.  8    |         accepted definition of civil society or organizations formed
221   IV,    13.  8    |            formed to represent civil society. Even within Member States
222   IV,    13.  8    |              classification of civil society actors varies. Many use
223   IV,    13.  8    |              synonymously with Civil Society Organisations (CSOs).~ ~
224   IV,    13.  8    |        working termsNGOs and civil society” are used to describe organisations
225   IV,    13.  8    |              a particular section of society;~They are autonomous from
226   IV,    13.  8    |   development of democracy and civil society in the candidate countries.” (
227   IV,    13.  9    |         Making it Work Better, Civil Society Contact Group, available
228   IV,    13.  9    |              A Priority for a Caring Society; European Journal of Public