Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  8    |        consequences of nuclear power accidents and nuclear waste disposal
  2   II,     4.  1    |              environmental risks and accidents, particularly traffic accidents
  3   II,     4.  1    |      accidents, particularly traffic accidents and accidents in the home,
  4   II,     4.  1    |   particularly traffic accidents and accidents in the home, all fields
  5   II,     4.  2    |       countries mortality by traffic accidents increased during the 1980s.
  6   II,     4.  2    |           1990s mortality by traffic accidents decreased strongly for men
  7   II,     4.  2    |              the effect of transport accidents on the mortality of men
  8   II,     5.  5.  1|          annual death toll from road accidents of about 50 000 deaths (
  9   II,     5.  5.  1|           suicide and self inflicted accidents per 100 000 people by country
 10   II,     5.  5.  1|           suicide and self inflicted accidents (per 100 000 people) by
 11   II,     5.  5.  1|           suicide and self inflicted accidents (per 100 000) in Europe.~ ~
 12   II,     5.  5.  1|           suicide and self inflicted accidents between the earlier and
 13   II,     5.  5.  1|           suicide and self inflicted accidents per age group and gender
 14   II,     5.  5.  3|              result of injuries from accidents and poisonings and cardiovascular
 15   II,     5.  5.  3|          causes, including seizures, accidents and respiratory diseases
 16   II,     5.  5.  3|             p<0.0001). Illnesses and accidents were mostly trivial and
 17   II,     5.  5.  3|              risk of seizure-related accidents (rate ratio, RR 1.8)(Vaa,
 18   II,     5.  5.  3|              and the risk of serious accidents (RR 1.4)(Taylor et al, 1996)
 19   II,     5.  5.  3|           however, the proportion of accidents attributable to epileptic
 20   II,     5.  5.  3|          Group (2002): Morbidity and accidents in patients with epilepsy:
 21   II,     5.  5.  3|            Johnson T (1996): Risk of accidents in drivers with epilepsy.
 22   II,     5.  5.  3|         injuries, mortality, traffic accidents and their prevention. Epilepsy
 23   II,     5.  5.  3|             the RESt-1 group (2004): Accidents in patients with epilepsy:
 24   II,     7        |                                   7.~ACCIDENTS AND INJURIES AND RELATED
 25   II,     7.Acr    |          ESAW~European Statistics on Accidents at Work~EU~European Union~
 26   II,     7.Acr    |        Database~HLA~Home and Leisure Accidents~ICD~International Statistical
 27   II,     7.  1    |      Injuries (unintentional due to “accidents” and intentional due to
 28   II,     7.  1    |         adolescents and young adults accidents and injuries are the leading
 29   II,     7.  1    |          except for home and leisure accidents.~ ~Many organisations worldwide
 30   II,     7.  1    |             as unintentional (due to accidents) and intentional (due to
 31   II,     7.  1    |         frequency of injuries due to accidents and violence and have been
 32   II,     7.  1    |           road fatalities, workplace accidents, chemical accidents and
 33   II,     7.  1    |        workplace accidents, chemical accidents and consumer product-related
 34   II,     7.  1    |              the huge social toll of accidents and injuries, in particular
 35   II,     7.  1    |              home, leisure and sport accidents, and safety of elderly citizens.~ ~
 36   II,     7.  2.  1|          EuroStat)~ ~ICD Chapters on accidents and injuries~ ~ICD-10:~-
 37   II,     7.  2.  2|    information on external causes on accidents and injuries - ICD10 Chapter
 38   II,     7.  2.  3|           Community database on road accidents resulting in death or injury (
 39   II,     7.  2.  3|          statistics on damage - only accidents). The major difference between
 40   II,     7.  2.  3|          detailed data on individual accidents as collected by the Member
 41   II,     7.  2.  4|               European Statistics on Accidents at Work)~ ~European Statistics
 42   II,     7.  2.  4|               European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW) are gathered
 43   II,     7.  2.  4|             1990. The data refers to accidents at work resulting in more
 44   II,     7.  2.  4|           absence from work (serious accidents) and fatal accidents.~ ~
 45   II,     7.  2.  4|         serious accidents) and fatal accidents.~ ~The national ESAW sources
 46   II,     7.  2.  4|              are the declarations of accidents at work, either to the public (
 47   II,     7.  2.  4|       private specific insurance for accidents at work, or to another relevant
 48   II,     7.  2.  4|          Social Security system. For accidents at work data is available
 49   II,     7.  2.  5|           comprehensive data on road accidents in order to provide internationally
 50   II,     7.  2.  7|             by CARE database on road accidents resulting in deaths or injuries,
 51   II,     7.  2.  8|            also contain questions on accidents and injuries~ ~Within the
 52   II,     7.  3.  1|         injuries.~· More than 80% of accidents happen in the area of home,
 53   II,     7.  3.  2|                motor vehicle traffic accidents (21%) and falls (19%) are
 54   II,     7.  3.  3|           Hospital admissions due to accidents and injuries in the EU27
 55   II,     7.  3.  4|  Distinguished by sector, work place accidents account for 4% of unintentional
 56   II,     7.  3.  4|  unintentional fatalities, transport accidents for 33%, and almost two
 57   II,     7.  3.  4|             home, leisure and sports accidents. This categorisation is
 58   II,     7.  3.  4|              external causes of road accidents for the identification and
 59   II,     7.  3.  4|              persons at road traffic accidents only sustain slight injuries (
 60   II,     7.  3.  4|               Nonfatal road traffic accidents per age group and injury
 61   II,     7.  3.  4|              of non-fatal work place accidents shows a significant variation
 62   II,     7.  3.  4|          injured due to work-related accidents~ ~Half of all work place
 63   II,     7.  3.  4|          circumstances of work place accidents can be found in the European
 64   II,     7.  3.  4|           the European statistics on accidents at work (ESAW) and the WHO
 65   II,     7.  3.  4|              only harmonised data on accidents at work of EU15 was collected.
 66   II,     7.  3.  4|             12. Non-fatal work place accidents by severity, EU15 + NO shows
 67   II,     7.  3.  4|              of non-fatal work place accidents in terms of lost working
 68   II,     7.  3.  4|             12. Non-fatal work place accidents by severity, EU15 + NO~ ~
 69   II,     7.  3.  4|   identification of home and leisure accidents in the available injury
 70   II,     7.  3.  4|       neither traffic nor work place accidents.~ ~Calculated in this way,
 71   II,     7.  3.  4|            of fatal home and leisure accidents in the EU27 is 22 per 100,
 72   II,     7.  3.  4|           rate of fatal road traffic accidents. In absolute terms every
 73   II,     7.  3.  4|            die from home and leisure accidents and 32 million injured people
 74   II,     7.  3.  4|              due to home and leisure accidents per country~ ~These numbers
 75   II,     7.  3.  4|          developed. Home and leisure accidents also comprise sport injuries
 76   II,     7.  3.  4|           patients) home and leisure accidents per activity at the time
 77   II,     7.  4    |              relevance and impact of accidents and injuries. The huge burden
 78   II,     7.  4    |         injuries. The huge burden of accidents and injuries to societies
 79   II,     7.  4    |           killer among young people: Accidents and injuries are the leading
 80   II,     7.  4    |             diverse areas as traffic accidents, drowning and suicides.~•
 81   II,     7.  4    |           not accurately quantified, accidents and injuries are assumed
 82   II,     7.  4.  1|             societies. Motor vehicle accidents, drowning and accidents
 83   II,     7.  4.  1|              accidents, drowning and accidents caused by fire and flames
 84   II,     7.  4.  1|         against drowning or domestic accidents.~ ~Link to the project:~htt ~ ~
 85   II,     7.  4.  1|            age group, EU27). Traffic accidents and suicides are the most
 86   II,     7.  4.  1|              Governmental Experts on Accidents and Injury Prevention, 2007).~ ~
 87   II,     7.  4.  3|             health sector to prevent accidents among vulnerable road-users (
 88   II,     7.  4.  5|               2001).~ ~Nevertheless, accidents involving non-food products
 89   II,     7.  4.  5|             home, leisure and sports accidents some kind of “product” is
 90   II,     7.  4.  5|         involved in home and leisure accidents, selected EUGLOREH countries~ ~
 91   II,     7.  5    |   initiatives. Although violence and accidents have always been a major
 92   II,     7.  5    |             Health services: Not all accidents and injuries can be prevented.
 93   II,     7.  7    |        Database (2008): Road traffic accidents by age group and injury
 94   II,     7.  7    |              2005): Home and leisure accidents by products involved. AT,
 95   II,     7.  7    |          Cronos databaseNumber of accidents at work by severity. EU15,
 96   II,     8.  1.  1|       traffic, home and leisure time accidents, or injured by unsafe products
 97   II,     8.  1.  1|           not accurately quantified, accidents and injuries are assumed
 98   II,     9        |   overcrowding increase the risks of accidents and transmission of infectious
 99   II,     9        |          ones, they succumb to fatal accidents more often. This may be
100   II,     9.  2.  1|      injuries (such as motor vehicle accidents, drowning and sports/recreational
101   II,     9.  2.  3|      neonates (see Chapter 4.2), and accidents for 5-14 year olds (see
102   II,     9.  2.  3|        injuries include road traffic accidents, poisonings, falls and drowning.
103   II,     9.  2.  3|           and drowning. Road traffic accidents represent the primary cause
104   II,     9.  2.  3|            three deaths from traffic accidents involves a person under
105   II,     9.  2.  3|          years of age die in traffic accidents and 335.000 are injured.
106   II,     9.  2.  3|            all injuries from traffic accidents (WHO, 2007a).~ ~However,
107   II,     9.  3.  1|     cardiovascular diseases, cancer, accidents, violence, suicide and alcohol,
108   II,     9.  3.  1|              of deaths in EU, 2005~ ~Accidents and injuries~ ~In the 15-
109   II,     9.  3.  1|              of death as a result of accidents as compared to women (see
110   II,     9.  3.  1|             to women (see Chapter on Accidents), with the majority of these
111   II,     9.  3.  1|             as a result of transport accidents is 2.4 times higher than
112   II,     9.  3.  1|         greater risk of road traffic accidents continues at all ages.~ ~
113   II,     9.  3.  1|             with another 4.5 million accidents resulting in more than 3
114   II,     9.  3.  1|             Commission, 2003). These accidents are estimated to cost the
115   II,     9.  3.  1|          billion Euro. Men have more accidents than women, young workers (
116   II,     9.  3.  1|              64 yrs) have more fatal accidents. Most injuries occur in
117   II,     9.  3.  1|          annual death toll from road accidents. Suicide is an important
118   II,     9.  4.  3|          necessary in this area.~ ~ ~Accidents and injuries~ ~In the age
119   II,     9.  4.  3|              the age group above 65, accidents are very frequent, with
120   II,     9.  4.  3|          ones, they succumb to fatal accidents more often. This may be
121   II,     9.  4.  4|   overcrowding increase the risks of accidents and transmission of infectious
122   II,     9.  4.  4|          ones, they succumb to fatal accidents more often. This may be
123   II,     9.  5.  1|             for men. Higher rates of accidents (traffic accidents, work-related
124   II,     9.  5.  1|          rates of accidents (traffic accidents, work-related accidents)
125   II,     9.  5.  1|              accidents, work-related accidents) and violence-related mortality
126   II,     9.  5.  2|       Rare Diseases and Injuries and Accidents).~See also section 9.2 for
127   II,     9.  5.  3|               males suffer more from accidents, back pain and hearing loss (
128  III,    10.  2.  1|            kills more than AIDS, car accidents, alcohol, homicides, illegal
129  III,    10.  2.  1|  concentrations (BACs) of drivers in accidents with the BACs of drivers
130  III,    10.  2.  1|              drivers not involved in accidents find that male and female
131  III,    10.  2.  1|          risk of fatal and non-fatal accidents and injuries. People who
132  III,    10.  2.  1|             deaths from road traffic accidents (1 in 3 of all road traffic
133  III,    10.  2.  1|      neuropsychiatric conditions and accidents, Figure 10.2.1.2.3.~ ~Figure
134  III,    10.  2.  1|      external causes (e.g. violence, accidents), stroke and liver disease (
135  III,    10.  2.  1|         mortality rates from traffic accidents and reduced rates of crime,
136  III,    10.  2.  1|           which many alcohol related accidents and violent events related
137  III,    10.  2.  1|            particularly road traffic accidents; however, the full benefits
138  III,    10.  2.  1|           behaviours may cause fatal accidents or injuries as well as chronic
139  III,    10.  2.  1|          mainly drug overdoses, AIDS accidents and suicides13.~ ~Drug-related
140  III,    10.  3.  2|              contaminated sites, and accidents) as well as diffused releases
141  III,    10.  3.  2|           carbon dioxide.~Industrial accidents typically cause acute damage
142  III,    10.  3.  2|             occur as consequences of accidents not only related to the
143  III,    10.  3.  2|           the sectors in which major accidents have happened in the past,
144  III,    10.  3.  2|            10.3.2.1. Some industrial accidents in Europe ~ ~The absolute
145  III,    10.  3.  2|           number of majorSeveso II accidents” (see below) reported for
146  III,    10.  3.  2|         where a series of industrial accidents happened in 2005 and 2006.
147  III,    10.  3.  2|             from industrial chemical accidents. In 2003, in the light of
148  III,    10.  3.  2|          light of serious industrial accidents, the Directive was extended
149  III,    10.  3.  4|          countries, 19902006~ ~Only accidents with 10 or more killed and/
150  III,    10.  3.  4|              included in the figure. Accidents include the following categories:~
151  III,    10.  3.  4|            categories:~1) industrial accidents: technological accidents
152  III,    10.  3.  4|             accidents: technological accidents of an industrial nature
153  III,    10.  3.  4|              and other technological accidents involving industrial sites;~
154  III,    10.  3.  4|       industrial sites;~2) transport accidents: technological transport
155  III,    10.  3.  4|              technological transport accidents involving mechanized modes
156  III,    10.  3.  4|              of transport, including accidents involving aeroplanes, helicopters,
157  III,    10.  3.  4|               airships and balloons, accidents involving sailing boats,
158  III,    10.  3.  4|           cruise ships, other boats, accidents involving trains and accidents
159  III,    10.  3.  4|       accidents involving trains and accidents involving motor vehicles
160  III,    10.  3.  4|         tracks; and~3) miscellaneous accidents: technological accidents
161  III,    10.  3.  4|             accidents: technological accidents of a non-industrial or transport
162  III,    10.  3.  4|              and other miscellaneous accidents involving domestic/non-industrial
163  III,    10.  4.  1|            to the impacts of traffic accidents. The highest estimated damage
164  III,    10.  4.  4|          Product Safety Directive.~ ~Accidents involving non-food products
165  III,    10.  4.  4|             home, leisure and sports accidents some kind of “product” is
166  III,    10.  4.  4|             protection is obvious.~ ~Accidents and injuries associated
167  III,    10.  4.  4|      identifies products involved in accidents and injuries and can provide
168  III,    10.  4.  5|             tanks and pipelines, and accidents are the most frequent sources
169  III,    10.  5.  1|             factors relevant to home accidentshuman behaviour and dwelling
170  III,    10.  5.  1|            of these home and leisure accidents occurred in or around the
171  III,    10.  5.  1|           non-fatal home and leisure accidents per year in selected EU
172  III,    10.  5.  1|         Norbäck, 1997). Violence and accidents in schools as well as burn
173  III,    10.  5.  2|        despite only one third of car accidents occur in rural areas, they
174  III,    10.  5.  2|           attributed to this sort of accidents. This problem of car traffic
175  III,    10.  5.  2|          This problem of car traffic accidents being more severe and leading
176  III,    10.  5.  3|            is focused mainly on work accidents and occupational diseases
177  III,    10.  5.  3|           public use file.~ ~Data on accidents at work are available from
178  III,    10.  5.  3|           data collection covers all accidents at work which involve absence
179  III,    10.  5.  3|           more than 3 days and fatal accidents occurring at work. The data
180  III,    10.  5.  3|               European Statistics on Accidents at Work”. Eurostat receives
181  III,    10.  5.  3|            the collection of data on accidents at work. These data are
182  III,    10.  5.  3|            on the declaration of the accidents according to the different
183  III,    10.  5.  3|           for the employer to report accidents to the relevant national
184  III,    10.  5.  3|       estimates the actual number of accidents occurring in these countries.
185  III,    10.  5.  3|             these countries. Data on accidents at work can be stratified
186  III,    10.  5.  3|              for fatal and non fatal accidents at work.~The Eurostat Online
187  III,    10.  5.  3|             affected by diseases and accidents through absenteeism of employees
188  III,    10.  5.  3|       occupational diseases and work accidents. This is then followed by
189  III,    10.  5.  3|               Walters, 2007).~ ~Work Accidents.~ ~European Statistics on
190  III,    10.  5.  3|               European Statistics on Accidents at Work (ESAW) refer to
191  III,    10.  5.  3|              at Work (ESAW) refer to accidents at work resulting in more
192  III,    10.  5.  3|           absence from work (serious accidents) (Table 10.5.3.5) and accidents
193  III,    10.  5.  3|      accidents) (Table 10.5.3.5) and accidents which leads to death within
194  III,    10.  5.  3|             follows, data on serious accidents are provided. For fatal
195  III,    10.  5.  3|              are provided. For fatal accidents see also Chapter 7.~ ~Table
196  III,    10.  5.  3|             5.3.5. Incidence of work accidents EU 15~ ~In 2004, approximately
197  III,    10.  5.  3| approximately 4 million serious work accidents were reported in Europe,
198  III,    10.  5.  3|             a remarkable decrease in accidents since 1994. However, in
199  III,    10.  5.  3|              see, a 20% reduction of accidents at work took place compared
200  III,    10.  5.  3|       increasing index figures.~Work accidents occur very differently across
201  III,    10.  5.  3|         transport sector the rate of accidents at work increased.~ ~Table
202  III,    10.  5.  3|             in the number of serious accidents at work per 100 thousand
203  III,    10.  5.  3|       Standardised incidence rate of accidents at work in EU15 by economic
204  III,    10.  5.  3|              the full impact of work accidents and occupational diseases
205  III,    10.  5.  3|             there are still too many accidents and diseases caused by work
206  III,    10.  5.  3|             focused on reducing work accidents and occupational diseases
207  III,    10.  5.  3|            reduction of occupational accidents per 100.000 workers in the
208  III,    10.  5.  3|            one of the main causes of accidents in all sectors from heavy
209  III,    10.  5.  3|            reduction of occupational accidents represent a significant
210  III,    10.  5.  3|            period, the rate of fatal accidents at work in the EU15 fell
211  III,    10.  5.  3|          while the rate of workplace accidents leading to absences of more
212  III,    10.  5.  3|            reduction of occupational accidents.~United Kingdom’s good performance
213   IV,    11.  5.  3|             systems and the audit of accidents are regulated. It is clear
214   IV,    12.  2    |            particularly road traffic accidents; however, the full benefits
215   IV,    12.  5    |              morbidity, injuries and accidents, mental health and health
216   IV,    12. 10    |          Training~( home and leisure accidents in particular for falls
217   IV,    12. 10    |          disorders from violence and accidents” in national Public Health
218   IV,    12. 10    |     awareness~Low~ ~Home and leisure accidents (fire, severe weather conditions,
219   IV,    12. 10    |     objective 5~ ~Protection against accidents policy~Transport policy~
220   IV,    12. 10    |         Rehabilitation measures~Work accidents/ diseases~ ~Systematic work
221   IV,    13.  2.  3|       consumption (4)~ ~Road traffic accidents, breast cancer~10,000-30,
222  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|           abuse~access~accessibility~accidents~acidification~acinetobacter~