Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  1        |                 countries, even after a child is born. Divorce has become
  2    I,     2.  4        |           educational outcomes for each child, is necessary to break the
  3    I,     3.  1        |                the birth of their first child. Postponement of having
  4    I,     3.  1        |              yet given birth to a first child. Since the ’90s the TFR
  5    I,     3.  1        |         educated women have their first child later in life than less
  6    I,     3.  1        |            towards postponing the first child started in the Scandinavian
  7    I,     3.  1        |               the 1930s had their first child earlier than women born
  8    I,     3.  1        |              1955 still had their first child relatively early in many
  9    I,     3.  1        |                 in 1965 had their first child on average between ages
 10    I,     3.  1.  0(1) |                    Postponing the first child should be understood in
 11    I,     3.  1.  0(1) |                are postponing to have a child as they may not have (had)
 12    I,     3.  1        |                cohorts may still have a child. Whether childlessness levels
 13    I,     3.  1        |                the women already have a child at the age of 20 — thus
 14   II,     5.  1.  4    |               and on how to deal with a child suffering from a specific
 15   II,     5.  5.  3    |             help when appropriate; if a child is bound and determined
 16   II,     5.  5.  3    |             Health Report 2005Part 3 Child an adolescent health and
 17   II,     5.  5.  3    |                is greatly improved if a child is placed into an intensive
 18   II,     5.  9.  4    |               for atopy at the time the child was born.. The European
 19   II,     5.  9.  4    |              asthma (OR = 3.8); and the child's history of asthmatic bronchitis (
 20   II,     5. 11.  3    |              cohort study (the National Child Development Study or NCDS)
 21   II,     6.  3.  5    | antibiotic-resistant pneumococci in the child population.~ ~The trends
 22   II,     6.  3.  6    |         Outbreaks have been reported in child day-care centres, in families,
 23   II,     6.  3.  7    |             transmission from mother to child. Since a first large outbreak
 24   II,     7.  1        |                for products (e.g. toys, child care articles, sport equipment,
 25   II,     7.  4.  1    |         playground safety and safety of child products, the usage of car
 26   II,     7.  4.  1    |               children.~ ~The “European Child Safety Alliance” (ww g)
 27   II,     7.  4.  1    |                national action plans on child safety (MacKay & Vincenten,
 28   II,     7.  4.  7    |             includes domestic violence, child abuse, abuse of the elderly
 29   II,     7.  6        |         vocational trainings; improving child safety, safety of elderly,
 30   II,     7.  7        |            Brussoni M, Towner L (2006): Child Safety Good Practice Guide:
 31   II,     7.  7        |            investments in unintentional child safety prevention and safety
 32   II,     7.  7        |          promotion. Amsterdam, European Child Safety Alliance, EuroSafe.~ ~
 33   II,     7.  7        |                 and Vincenten J (2007): Child Safety Summary Report Card
 34   II,     7.  7        |                18 Countries. Amsterdam, Child Safety Alliance, EuroSafe.~ ~
 35   II,     8.  2.  1    |              can start anytime before a child reaches the age of 18 years.
 36   II,     8.  2.  1    |              causes can happen before a child is born or during childhood.
 37   II,     8.  2.  1    |                that take place before a child is born include genetic
 38   II,     8.  2.  1    |        disability do not happen until a child is older. These may include
 39   II,     8.  2.  1    |               doctors can find out if a child has one of these conditions
 40   II,     8.  2.  1    |                a family member or other child with a known inherited disorder,
 41   II,     8.  2.  1    |              risk of having an affected child. Women who plan to get pregnant
 42   II,     8.  2.  1    |             lowers the risk of having a child with intellectual disability.
 43   II,     8.  2.  1    |           started soon enough after the child is born and continues as
 44   II,     8.  2.  1    |        continues as long as needed, the child will not have intellectual
 45   II,     9            |                the future health of her child. There is a direct relation
 46   II,     9            |                during pregnancy and the child’s vulnerability to several
 47   II,     9            |             only become manifest as the child matures. Though congenital
 48   II,     9.  1.  1    |          post-war focus on maternal and child health programmes in many
 49   II,     9.  1.  1    |             themes: fetal, neonatal and child health; maternal health;
 50   II,     9.  1.  1    |               county, 1980-91. Arch Dis Child 2003;88(2):114-7.~Canterino
 51   II,     9.  1.  1    |          surveys and registers. Dev Med Child Neurol 2000;42(12):816-24.~ ~
 52   II,     9.  1.  2    |                 other subgroups (i.e. a child with an abdominal wall defect
 53   II,     9.  1.  2    |           rare diseases, peri-natal and child health, environmental health
 54   II,     9.  1.  2    |               long term outcome for the child and family in terms of survival,
 55   II,     9.  2.  1    |                and drinking patterns.~ ~Child health covers maintaining
 56   II,     9.  2.  1    |            Major initiatives to address child safety issues in Europe
 57   II,     9.  2.  1    |             being taken by the European Child Safety Alliance (www ),
 58   II,     9.  2.  1    |        particular through the EU-funded Child Safety Action Plans project (
 59   II,     9.  2.  1    |          balanced diet is essential for child health as it influences
 60   II,     9.  2.  1    |               the European Strategy for Child and Adolescent Health and
 61   II,     9.  2.  1    |                own declared priority in child health. An earlier and still
 62   II,     9.  2.  1    |                Health Ministers.~ ~Both Child and Adolescent Health and
 63   II,     9.  2.  2    |              health information project Child Health Indicators of Life
 64   II,     9.  2.  2    |                of Life and Development (CHILD), which reported in 2002 (
 65   II,     9.  2.  2    |                major European report on child public health was the WHO
 66   II,     9.  2.  2    |                 many of the recommended CHILD indicators, together with
 67   II,     9.  2.  2    |                the apparent priority of child health for the European
 68   II,     9.  2.  2    |      statistical output such as data on Child Friendly Cities. Their Baby
 69   II,     9.  2.  2    |            Their Report Card in 2005 on Child Poverty in Rich Countries
 70   II,     9.  2.  2    |                data-rich regarding that child health inequalities topic
 71   II,     9.  2.  2    |         Convention on the Rights of the Child, to which all European countries
 72   II,     9.  2.  2    |                ensure “the right of the child to the enjoyment of the
 73   II,     9.  2.  2    |                important element of the child population at a key stage
 74   II,     9.  2.  2    |          forming one sixth of the total child population. The use of a
 75   II,     9.  2.  2    |               example, when assessing a child’s experience, it is necessary
 76   II,     9.  2.  3    |              and analysis~ ~Infants and child (14 years) deaths have
 77   II,     9.  2.  3    |            Intentional injuries include child abuse and neglect, self-inflicted
 78   II,     9.  2.  3    |          situation in many countries is child physical and emotional abuse,
 79   II,     9.  2.  3    |                needs highlighted by the CHILD report in 2002, but it still
 80   II,     9.  2.  3    |                the virus from mother to child (UNICEF, 2002). UNICEF’s
 81   II,     9.  2.  3    |                by the rapid increase of child obesity. At the same time,
 82   II,     9.  2.  3    |                 in Southern Europe, one child in three is overweight (
 83   II,     9.  2.  3    |              and long waiting lists for child psychiatry services of various
 84   II,     9.  2.  4    |                the future health of her child. There is a direct relation
 85   II,     9.  2.  4    |                during pregnancy and the child’s vulnerability to several
 86   II,     9.  2.  4    |             only become manifest as the child matures. Though congenital
 87   II,     9.  2.  5    |                an important role in the child health service. There are
 88   II,     9.  2.  5    |               the primacy of seeing the child in the context of the family
 89   II,     9.  2.  5    |             vis-à-vis the Rights of the Child~- To increase cooperation
 90   II,     9.  2.  5    |               protect the rights of the child. For example, in the last
 91   II,     9.  2.  5    |      Communication on the Rights of the Child (European Commission, 2006a)
 92   II,     9.  2.  5    |             provision of care for every child and the combating of HIV/AIDS.~ ~
 93   II,     9.  2.  5    |            Strategy on Infant and Young Child Feeding in May 2002. This
 94   II,     9.  2.  5    |               WHO/Europe’s programme on child and adolescent health and
 95   II,     9.  2.  5    |         Convention on the Rights of the Child, and help to achieve the
 96   II,     9.  2.  5    |               the European Strategy for Child and Adolescent Health and
 97   II,     9.  2.  6    |                   A number of important child health information initiatives
 98   II,     9.  2.  6    |                obesity, and projects on child safety and perinatal health.
 99   II,     9.  2.  6    |                 analysis of patterns of child mortality. It is also essential
100   II,     9.  2.  6    |         children of different ages;~ ~· Child impairment, disability,
101   II,     9.  2.  6    |            problem.~ ~The health of the child begins in the womb, hence
102   II,     9.  2.  6    |      health-related behaviour are major child health determinants. Attention
103   II,     9.  2.  7    |           Available at:~htt ~ ~European Child Safety Alliance (2008):
104   II,     9.  2.  7    |                 Safety Alliance (2008): Child Safety Action Planning.
105   II,     9.  2.  7    |           Strategy on the Rights of the ChildCOM(2006) 367 final. Available
106   II,     9.  2.  7    |      development at the age of 7 years. Child Care Health Dev. 22:55-71.~ ~
107   II,     9.  2.  7    |        opportunity.pdf~ ~UNICEF (2005): Child Poverty in Rich Countries
108   II,     9.  2.  7    |         Convention on the Rights of the Child; United Nations, New York.~ ~
109   II,     9.  2.  7    |         Convention on the Rights of the Child. General Assembly resolution
110   II,     9.  2.  7    |                   European Strategy for Child and Adolescent Health and
111   II,     9.  3.  1    |                the virus from mother to child. Effective prevention programmes
112   II,     9.  3.  1    |      development at the age of 7 years. Child Care, Health & Development;
113   II,     9.  3.  2    |               county, 1980-91. Arch Dis Child 2003;88(2):114-7.~ ~Canterino
114   II,     9.  3.  2    |          surveys and registers. Dev Med Child Neurol 2000;42(12):816-24.~ ~
115   II,     9.  4.  6    |             young to middle-age, stable child / teen numbers)~ ~
116   II,     9.  5.  3    |               divorce, family break-up, child neglect and abuse.~ ~Risk
117   II,     9.  5.  6    |      development at the age of 7 years. Child Care, Health & Development;
118  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 Effects on Maternal and Child Health~Other diseases and
119  III,    10.  2.  1    |              the environment in which a child grows up through financial
120  III,    10.  2.  1    |              that alcohol is a cause of child abuse in 16% of cases.~The
121  III,    10.  2.  1    |              all suicides)~- 16% of all child abuse / neglect~- 5-9 million
122  III,    10.  2.  1    |              homicide, family violence, child abuse and other violence
123  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 Petersen et al, 2005)~ ~Child population are likely to
124  III,    10.  2.  1    |         diseases, and into maternal and child health policies; (ii) to
125  III,    10.  2.  1(21)|                Institute for Mother and Child Care, 2003), Slovakia (National
126  III,    10.  2.  1    |                Institute for Mother and Child Care, 2003; Antal et al,
127  III,    10.  2.  1    |        importance not only for women of child bearing age (Rampersaud
128  III,    10.  2.  1    |             precondition to provide the child with the adequate micronutrient
129  III,    10.  2.  1    |                Institute for Mother and Child Care (2003): National nutritional
130  III,    10.  2.  1    |                Institute for Mother and Child Care.~ ~Aranceta-Bartrina
131  III,    10.  2.  1    |           Reilly JJ, Emmett PM, for the Child health information team (
132  III,    10.  2.  1    |                 standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide:
133  III,    10.  2.  5    |             evaluating early mother and child interaction to promote child
134  III,    10.  2.  5    |            child interaction to promote child health and prevent psychosocial
135  III,    10.  2.  5    |                  is associated with the child's social functioning and
136  III,    10.  2.  5    |                infant's needs gives the child emotional experience, which
137  III,    10.  2.  5    |         training programme for staff in child health clinics has been
138  III,    10.  2.  5    |          interaction between mother and child. A controlled evaluation
139  III,    10.  2.  5    |      intervention group, but effects on child development were more ambiguous.~ ~
140  III,    10.  2.  5    |                 externalizing behavior. Child Dev 2007;78:1222-39.~ ~Barker
141  III,    10.  2.  5    |               33.~Black J (1998): How a child builds its brain: Some lessons
142  III,    10.  2.  5    |            toddler behavior problems. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2007;
143  III,    10.  2.  5    |           interaction as a predictor of child's chronic health problems.
144  III,    10.  2.  5    |                chronic health problems. Child Care Health Dev 2003;29(
145  III,    10.  3.  1    |                important to protect the child from major noise impacts.~ ~
146  III,    10.  4.  1    |               present themselves during child and adult life. Children
147  III,    10.  5.  1    |          concern for children (European Child Safety Alliance, 2006).~
148  III,    10.  5.  1    |                 population and that the child death rate is up to four
149  III,    10.  5.  1    |              Gov't] Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 35(6):1021-33.~
150  III,    10.  5.  1    |                 1389-1396(8)~ ~European Child Safety Alliance (2006):
151  III,    10.  5.  1    |                 Safety Alliance (2006): Child safety product guide: potentially
152  III,    10.  5.  1    |            dangerous products.~European Child Safety Alliance, Amsterdam.
153  III,    10.  6.  1    |           contact to the most contacted child~ ~The SHARE study showed
154  III,    10.  6.  1    |               parent and most contacted child in 41-86% of the cases in
155  III,    10.  6.  3    |             includes domestic violence, child abuse, abuse of the elderly
156  III,    10.  6.  3    |         non-physical violence including child neglect and abuse, is clear
157  III,    10.  6.  3    |           Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (IPSCAN)
158   IV,    12.  2        |          homicide, family violence, and child abuse and other violence
159   IV,    12. 10        |                charged the Institute of Child Health (www r) to conduct
160   IV,    12. 10        |               Deprivation factors~ high~Child protection laws ~Special
161   IV,    12. 10        |               culture, social services, child and adolescent issues, disability
162   IV,    12. 10        |            Consumer policy~Youth policy~Child policy~Energy balance~Proportion
163   IV,    12. 10        |            Consumer policy~Taxes policy~Child policy~ ~Breastfeeding frequency~
164   IV,    12. 10        |             policy~Public health policy~Child policy~Physical activity~ ~
165   IV,    12. 10        |                 policy~Education policy~Child policy~Consumer policy~Youth
166   IV,    12. 10        |             policy~Public health policy~Child policy~Persistent organic
167   IV,    12. 10        |           health policy~Consumer policy~Child policy~UV radiation~Number
168   IV,    12. 10        |                5~ ~Environmental policy~Child policy~Radon~Radon levels
169   IV,    12. 10        |             policy~Public health policy~Child policy~Environments that
170   IV,    12. 10        |              policy~Working life policy~Child policy~Products that can
171   IV,    12. 10        |           objective 5~ ~Consumer policy~Child policy~Food safety~ ~Incidence
172   IV,    12. 10        |            objective 2~ ~Housing policy~Child policy~Access to disabled
173   IV,    12. 10        |             service policy~Youth policy~Child policy~ ~Gender equality~
174   IV,    12. 10        |           service policy~Old age policy~Child policy~Social support~Emotional
175   IV,    12. 10        |           service policy~Old age policy~Child policy~Accessibility~ ~Proportion
176   IV,    12. 10        |                3~ ~Public health policy~Child policy~Preschool environment~
177   IV,    12. 10        |          objective 3~ ~Education policy~Child policy~School environment~
178   IV,    12. 10        |          objective 3~ ~Education policy~Child policy~Children's and young
179   IV,    12. 10        |          objective 3~ ~Education policy~Child policy~ ~Personal determinants~ ~
180   IV,    12. 10        |            Consumer policy~Taxes policy~Child policy~ ~ ~Genomics and
181   IV,    13.  6.  1    |                out in the report of the CHILD project (Rigby and Köhler,
182   IV,    13.  6.  1    |           reported in the project, if a child is unable to play normally,
183   IV,    13.  6.  1    |             with their family. Once the child reaches school years, the
184   IV,    13.  6.  1    |                an adverse effect on the child throughout his/her life –
185   IV,    13.  6.  1    |             social relationships.~ ~The child, however, is not the only
186   IV,    13.  6.  1    |           efforts) to the care of their child. This may result in a reduction
187   IV,    13.  6.  1    |                 of an ill, or disabled, child – not just by the loss of
188   IV,    13.  6.  1    |              friends to interact.~ ~The CHILD project report summed up
189   IV,    13.  6.  1    |                summed up the burdens of child ill-health as those of:~ ~·
190   IV,    13.  6.  1    |              Discomfort and pain on the child;~· Anxiety, stress, and
191   IV,    13.  6.  1    |              handicap;~· Effects on the child of loss of play, education,
192   IV,    13.  6.  1    |              generations, if a disabled child becomes an adult who needs
193   IV,    13.  6.  2    |            first point of contact for a child with a health or health-related
194   IV,    13.  6.  2    |                 to raise, but where the child feels that progressing it
195   IV,    13.  6.  2    |            context, is perceived by the child as the source of the problem.
196   IV,    13.  6.  2    |              advice. In cases where the child has decided to become sexually
197   IV,    13.  6.  2    |                                13.6.2.5 Child Health Service Quality~ ~
198   IV,    13.  6.  2    |      Measurement of service quality for child health services is problematic.
199   IV,    13.  6.  3    |         resident families.~ ~However, a child should not be the victim
200   IV,    13.  6.  3    |     circumstances or past actions. Each child is a human being and a global
201   IV,    13.  6.  3    |         Convention on the Rights of the Child each child is entitled to
202   IV,    13.  6.  3    |                Rights of the Child each child is entitled to the right
203   IV,    13.  9        |              Köhler L (editors) (2002): Child Health Indicators of Life
204   IV,    13.  9        |                of Life and Development (CHILD): Report to the European
205   IV,    13.  9        |            Blair ME, Mechtler R (2003): Child Health Indicators for Europe –
206   IV,    13.  9        |         Convention on the Rights of the Child, United Nations, New York.~ ~
207  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0    |     chemotherapy~chickenpox~chikungunya~child~childbearing~children~chlamydia~