Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  1    |                more and more necessary. Interventions need to adopt a health-in-all
  2    I,     2.  1    |          influence the context in which interventions and actions to preserve
  3    I,     2.  4    |                 of effective healthcare interventions (e.g. hypertension detection
  4    I,     2.  4    |                 and treatment, surgical interventions and thrombolytic therapy).
  5    I,     2.  5    |             health and workplace health interventions among workers will be a
  6    I,     2. 10.  1|       prevention programme and clinical interventions will be specifically targeted
  7   II,     5.  1.  3|         additional to that of all other interventions such as pharmacological
  8   II,     5.  2.  5|                 risk subjects, if these interventions fail to bring the patient’
  9   II,     5.  2.  5|        effective measures, policies and interventions are in place in all European
 10   II,     5.  2.  6|            modifiable through lifestyle interventions. The great majority of cardiology
 11   II,     5.  2.  6|           improved knowledge of dietary interventions useful to control plasma
 12   II,     5.  2.  6|                   Lifestyle improvement interventions are associated to moderate
 13   II,     5.  3.  7|             population is influenced by interventions of different kinds, from
 14   II,     5.  3.  7|        treatment and support;~· Complex interventions for diagnosis or treatment
 15   II,     5.  4.  2|              event rates after hospital interventions is necessary to organize
 16   II,     5.  4.  2|               diagnostic or therapeutic interventions can be obtained in an anonymous
 17   II,     5.  5.Int|      psychotherapeutic and psychosocial interventions for older people.~ ~Some
 18   II,     5.  5.  1|                 disorder with effective interventions available. Under-recognition
 19   II,     5.  5.  1|                 Mental health promotion Interventions into CountriesPolicies,
 20   II,     5.  5.  1|           People (2000-1) included also interventions for schools.~o Mental health promotion
 21   II,     5.  5.  2|             treatment and psycho-social interventions, risk factors and risk reduction/
 22   II,     5.  5.  3|         supported through psycho-social interventions.~A recently published meta-analysis
 23   II,     5.  5.  3|              preventive effects of such interventions. More conservative opinions
 24   II,     5.  5.  3|                complex armamentarium of interventions to be applied on an individual
 25   II,     5.  5.  3|             available, staff knowledge, interventions to enhance compliance, etc.),
 26   II,     5.  5.  3| psycho-pharmacotherapy and psychosocial interventions~Although there is plenty
 27   II,     5.  5.  3|         implementation for this kind of interventions and to develop strategies
 28   II,     5.  5.  3|                 neglecting psychosocial interventions (Lehman and Steinwachs,
 29   II,     5.  5.  3|                 5.5.3.2.3. Psychosocial interventions reflected in European guidelines~
 30   II,     5.  5.  3|        evaluation of the effects of the interventions according to the German
 31   II,     5.  5.  3|             Mental Disorders: Effective Interventions and Policy Options” (2005)
 32   II,     5.  5.  3|               three years of antistigma interventions. Schizophr Res. 2007 Oct
 33   II,     5.  5.  3|            Vauth R (2006): Psychosocial Interventions in Long-term Treatment in
 34   II,     5.  5.  3|             Mental Disorders: Effective Interventions and Policy Options Available
 35   II,     5.  5.  3|                personality, appropriate interventions can address these other
 36   II,     5.  6.  5|             together the evidence-based interventions that have been identified
 37   II,     5.  6.  5|            achieved from evidence-based interventions with what those with musculoskeletal
 38   II,     5.  8.  4|               old age, such as enhanced interventions for acute cardiovascular
 39   II,     5.  8.  5|       under-diagnosis and strengthening interventions to stop smoking. Cessation
 40   II,     5.  9. FB|                 intervention studies.~ ~Interventions for primary prevention are
 41   II,     5. 11.  3|               in Germany and regulatory interventions, Contact Dermatitis, 2003;
 42   II,     5. 14.  2|              the outcomes, i.e. whether interventions contributed to health or
 43   II,     5. 15.  4|              diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. This sector will include
 44   II,     6.  3.  1|                methods for follow-up of interventions made. Also more and better
 45   II,     6.  3.  4|       infections prevented.~Guidance on interventions for specific risk groups,
 46   II,     6.  4.  1|               factors, and the need for interventions. They provide information
 47   II,     6.  4.  5|                 evaluate the effects of interventions. The following priorities
 48   II,     7.  1    |                 evaluate the success of interventions designed to reduce injuries.
 49   II,     7.  4    |          regarding the effectiveness of interventions and the cost-effectiveness
 50   II,     7.  4    |       cost-effectiveness of alternative interventions in relation to the various
 51   II,     7.  4    |            successful implementation of interventions in the European context
 52   II,     7.  4.  3|                 address initiatives for interventions by the public health sector
 53   II,     7.  4.  4|               admissions and 15 million interventions by other medical and paramedical
 54   II,     7.  4.  6|             array of suicide preventive interventions addressing different risk
 55   II,     7.  5    |               often exceed the costs of interventions by a factor of several times.
 56   II,     7.  7    |             what are the most effective interventions to prevent these falls?
 57   II,     8.  2.  1|              health care and to optimal interventions on the part of people with
 58   II,     9.  1    |               of medical technology and interventions, reduce social inequalities
 59   II,     9.  1.  1|          Patterns of use of obstetrical interventions in 12 countries. Paediatr
 60   II,     9.  2.  3|         important to promote preventive interventions, as they have been shown
 61   II,     9.  3.  1|                 more options and better interventions for healthy menopausal years
 62   II,     9.  3.  1|          implementation and evaluation. Interventions are needed to support Member
 63   II,     9.  3.  2|               of conditions and medical interventions that have a clear definition
 64   II,     9.  3.  2|        healthcare services must measure interventions implemented to prevent death
 65   II,     9.  3.  2|             higher rates of obstetrical interventions, such as indicated caesarean
 66   II,     9.  3.  2|            anxiety, unnecessary medical interventions and poor use of valuable
 67   II,     9.  3.  2|          Patterns of use of obstetrical interventions in 12 countries. Paediatr
 68   II,     9.  3.  3|                design and assessment of interventions to improve sexual health.~ ~
 69   II,     9.  3.  3|               2003).~ ~Individual-based interventions also need to be targeted
 70   II,     9.  3.  3|                 as well as other social interventions. A way of ensuring that
 71   II,     9.  3.  3|               to protect sexual health. Interventions encouraging the adoption
 72   II,     9.  3.  3|             mainly on the assessment of interventions to change individual behaviour
 73   II,     9.  3.  3|                  Peersman G, Napuli IZ, Interventions for encouraging sexual lifestyles
 74   II,     9.  4.  2|          technological or other service interventions.~ ~Figure 9.4.1. Ability
 75   II,     9.  4.  3|      psychotherapeutic and psychosocial interventions are also effective (European
 76   II,     9.  4.  5|               and social activity group interventions targeting older people to
 77   II,     9.  5.  1|               considered in appropriate interventions.~ ~There is still a lack
 78   II,     9.  5.  5|         evidence of successful targeted interventions.~ ~
 79  III,    10.  1    |             important for health policy interventions. Associations between determinants
 80  III,    10.  1.  1|         non-integrated) or simultaneous interventions targeting physical activity
 81  III,    10.  1.  1|                       For what concerns interventions on alcohol consumption,
 82  III,    10.  2.  1|              region's GDP.~ ~Success of interventions geared at smoking behaviour
 83  III,    10.  2.  1|                 populations. Collective interventions, such as anti-smoking campaigns
 84  III,    10.  2.  1|           taking up smoking. Individual interventions, such as pharmacological
 85  III,    10.  2.  1|                 ETS due to anti-smoking interventions, such as restrictions of
 86  III,    10.  2.  1|             harm reduction~ ~Individual interventions~ ~An individual approach
 87  III,    10.  2.  1|                combined with collective interventions.~Only 3% of smokers manage
 88  III,    10.  2.  1|                 al, 2000). Psychosocial interventions are helpful at all phases
 89  III,    10.  2.  1|               counselling.~ ~Collective interventionstobacco control in the
 90  III,    10.  2.  1|          control in the EU~ ~Collective interventions geared towards the reduction
 91  III,    10.  2.  1|              shows that tobacco control interventions are the second most cost
 92  III,    10.  2.  1|            Heart Disease~CHOICE~CHOsing Interventions that are Cost-Effective
 93  III,    10.  2.  1|                  GBD) projectCHOsing Interventions that are Cost-Effective
 94  III,    10.  2.  1|            treatment~ ~Healthcare-based interventions for hazardous and harmful
 95  III,    10.  2.  1|       opportunistic screening and brief interventions for people with hazardous
 96  III,    10.  2.  1|        psychosocial and pharmacological interventions of varying intensities in
 97  III,    10.  2.  1|               and cost-effectiveness of interventions delivered in primary and
 98  III,    10.  2.  1|          Effectiveness of brief alcohol interventions in primary care populations.
 99  III,    10.  2.  1|                 in the following areas: interventions to reduce drug-related problems (
100  III,    10.  2.  1|                extensive strategies and interventions to reduce these drug-related
101  III,    10.  2.  1|           treatment and harm reduction) interventions and generally set out a
102  III,    10.  2.  1|                and of the impact of the interventions at national level.~ ~Prevention
103  III,    10.  2.  1|                 by selective prevention interventions targeting different groups
104  III,    10.  2.  1|               information and awareness interventions are still widespread in
105  III,    10.  2.  1|            treatment and harm reduction interventions in Europe. Methadone and
106  III,    10.  2.  1|         implemented in conjunction with interventions complemented by outreach
107  III,    10.  2.  1|           accessibility of drug-related interventions (prevention, treatment,
108  III,    10.  2.  1|          rapidly. The evidence base for interventions at individual, school, workplace
109  III,    10.  2.  1|                base for population-wide interventions, although they have proven
110  III,    10.  2.  1|               preventing obesity. These interventions need to be integrated across
111  III,    10.  2.  1|         effectiveness of (family-based) interventions to prevent excess body weight
112  III,    10.  2.  1|           changes might be possible and interventions might be effective if they
113  III,    10.  2.  1|                 at the effectiveness of interventions to promote healthy eating
114  III,    10.  2.  1|                is found in school-based interventions that deliver an intense
115  III,    10.  2.  1|           Limited evidence is found for interventions based on the school fruit
116  III,    10.  2.  1|               recommends an emphasis on interventions combining instruction on
117  III,    10.  2.  1|                al, 2005).~ ~Micro-scale interventions are likely to have small
118  III,    10.  2.  1|             effects unless supported by interventions applied to macro-settings,
119  III,    10.  2.  1|                 and whole-of-government interventions (e.g. taxation and pricing
120  III,    10.  2.  1|           studies measure the effect of interventions at community, local or programme
121  III,    10.  2.  1|            Brown T, Campbell KJ (2005): Interventions for preventing obesity in
122  III,    10.  2.  1|                 1998): Effectiveness of interventions to promote healthy eating
123  III,    10.  2.  2|           physical activity and dietary interventions useful to control plasma
124  III,    10.  2.  3|                   Lifestyle improvement interventions are associated to significant
125  III,    10.  2.  4|             evidence-based policies and interventions that improve population
126  III,    10.  2.  4|                 programmes and clinical interventions will be specifically targeted
127  III,    10.  2.  4|             risk groups and implemented interventions for subgroups of the population (
128  III,    10.  2.  4|              family-oriented preventive interventions. In the future we may start
129  III,    10.  2.  4|             evidence-based policies and interventions that improve population
130  III,    10.  2.  5|           health, i.e. health promoting interventions during pregnancy and early
131  III,    10.  2.  5|          pregnancy and early childhood. Interventions include health promotion
132  III,    10.  2.  5|                 and reduce smoking, and interventions to support an early and
133  III,    10.  4.  5|         evaluation research after major interventions.~ ~Priority needs for research
134  III,    10.  5.  2|           lifestyle choices and medical interventions as those living in urban
135  III,    10.  5.  3|             health and workplace health interventions among workers will be a
136  III,    10.  5.  3|          chapter it is pointed out that interventions to improve workplace health,
137  III,    10.  5.  3|     characteristics and benefits. These interventions can effectively improve
138  III,    10.  5.  3|                 2002).~Workplace health interventions are most effective when
139  III,    10.  5.  3|      Health Promotion. Workplace health interventions have been shown to have
140  III,    10.  5.  3|           prevention~- workplace health interventions are available and effective~-
141  III,    10.  6.  1|              reported in social support interventions made to enhance health,
142  III,    10.  6.  1|              design, timing and dose of interventions that work, as well as the
143  III,    10.  6.  2|                of effective health care interventions (e.g. hypertension detection
144  III,    10.  6.  2|                 and treatment, surgical interventions and thrombolytic therapy).
145  III,    10.  6.  2|            order to establish effective interventions aimed at tackling health
146   IV,    11.  1.  3|                health care and range of interventions and pharmaceuticals is much
147   IV,    11.  1.  4|                though it is likely that interventions that extend beyond the provision
148   IV,    11.  1.  5|                on specific diseases and interventions. In the UK, the GP contract
149   IV,    11.  1.  5|                 relative to alternative interventions for improving healthcare
150   IV,    11.  1.  5|       behavioural changes to particular interventions and with assessing the spillover
151   IV,    11.  1.  5|                the spillover effects of interventions onto behaviours other than
152   IV,    11.  1.  5|              Patients who face multiple interventions and have more serious conditions,
153   IV,    11.  2.  2|                 different public health interventions. One exception may be in
154   IV,    11.  2.  2|     cost-effectiveness of public health interventions. Commentators have argued
155   IV,    11.  4    |                 and non-pharmacological interventions and therapies, surgery and
156   IV,    11.  4    |             organisational and clinical interventions e.g. acute inpatient care
157   IV,    11.  4    |           efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. However, unnecessary duplication
158   IV,    11.  6.  4|            cost-effectiveness of health interventions, can be critical. In many
159   IV,    11.  6.  4|               the cost-effectiveness of interventions is either not available
160   IV,    11.  6.  4|                 individualized curative interventions rather than on wider population
161   IV,    11.  6.  4|                than on wider population interventions and public health initiatives.
162   IV,    11.  6.  4|     implementing health technologies or interventions into the health system.
163   IV,    11.  6.  4|               inclusion or exclusion of interventions and – last but not least -
164   IV,    11.  6.  4|             specific medical and health interventions. Attributing changes in
165   IV,    11.  6.  5|              appraisal of public health interventions. Briefing paper. London,
166   IV,    12.  2    |                 risk subjects, if these interventions fail to bring the patient’
167   IV,    12.  2    |        effective measures, policies and interventions are in place in all European
168   IV,    12.  2    |             population is influenced by interventions of different kinds, from
169   IV,    12.  2    |               Tobacco~ ~1.1. Individual interventions~ ~An individual approach
170   IV,    12.  2    |           another 50-100%. Psychosocial interventions are helpful at all phases
171   IV,    12.  2    |           counseling.~ ~1.2. Collective interventionstobacco control in the
172   IV,    12.  2    |          control in the EU~ ~Collective interventions geared towards the reduction
173   IV,    12.  2    |            treatment~ ~Healthcare-based interventions for hazardous and harmful
174   IV,    12.  2    |       opportunistic screening and brief interventions for persons with hazardous
175   IV,    12.  2    |       psychosocial, and pharmacological interventions of varying intensities in
176   IV,    12.  7    |                of policies and specific interventions on health. The European
177   IV,    12. 10    |              Priority for Public Health Interventions~Main regulations adopted~
178   IV,    12. 10    |              Priority for Public Health Interventions~Main regulations adopted~
179   IV,    12. 10    |                which specific practical interventions that actually makes a difference.~ ~
180   IV,    12. 10    |              Priority for Public Health Interventions~Main regulations adopted~
181   IV,    12. 10    |         information tools, hotlines and interventions are provided by these authorities (
182   IV,    12. 10    |             onset by healthy life style interventions.~§ 21 SGB V (prevention
183   IV,    12. 10    |         information tools, hotlines and interventions are provided by these authorities:~www –
184   IV,    12. 10    |               drug related programs and interventions).~Sexual behaviour~High
185   IV,    12. 10    |              Priority for Public Health Interventions~Main regulations adopted~
186   IV,    12. 10    |              Priority for Public Health Interventions~Main regulations adopted~
187   IV,    12. 10    |           various types of psychosocial interventions such as:~ ~Institutes for
188   IV,    12. 10    |              Priority for Public Health Interventions~Main regulations adopted~
189   IV,    12. 10    |              Priority for Public Health Interventions~Main regulations adopted~
190   IV,    12. 10    |              Priority for Public Health Interventions~Main regulations adopted~
191   IV,    12. 10    |              Priority for Public Health Interventions~Main regulations adopted~
192   IV,    12. 10    |              Priority for Public Health Interventions~Main regulations adopted~
193   IV,    12. 10    |             especially as regards early interventions for families with parental
194   IV,    12. 10    |          relevant policy areas in which interventions are planned. Various laws
195   IV,    12. 10    |              Priority for Public Health Interventions~Main regulations adopted~
196   IV,    13.Acr    |             evaluation of public health interventions in the remit of the National
197   IV,    13.  5    |                and to plan and evaluate interventions aimed at preventing the
198   IV,    13.  7    |                 and making new surgical interventions and assisted reproduction