Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  1       |           the Berlin wall, also the Eastern partsadoptedsimilar
  2    I,     2.  4       |   inequalities in mortality were in Eastern Europe at least as big,
  3    I,     2.  4       |            78 per cent in the three Eastern European countries, as compared
  4    I,     2.  4       |            similar magnitude in the Eastern compared to the Western
  5    I,     2.  4       |   dramatically in many countries in Eastern Europe, sometimes for the
  6    I,     2.  4       |            Evidence from some other Eastern European countries suggests
  7    I,     2.  5       |             new member states (i.e. Eastern European countries). In
  8    I,     2.  8       |              in several central and Eastern European countries, both
  9    I,     2.  9       |          and increases in the northeastern part of Europe. Climate
 10    I,     3.  1       |           replacement; Southern and Eastern European fertility decline
 11    I,     3.  1       |             rise somewhat later. In Eastern Europe this trend has been
 12    I,     3.  1       |          although slightly lower in Eastern Europe. Currently the age
 13    I,     3.  1       |          and Southern Europe, while Eastern Europe is lagging behind
 14    I,     3.  1       |           although a bit earlier in Eastern Europe.~Currently, cohort
 15    I,     3.  1       |           reasons that countries in Eastern and Southern Europe with
 16    I,     3.  1       | childbearing’ is characteristic for Eastern European countries. Opposite
 17    I,     3.  2       |        surplus, the new Central and Eastern EU-Member States have low
 18    I,     3.  2       |           colonies, or countries of Eastern Europe. The strict immigration
 19   II,     4.  1       |      comparison between Western and eastern countries. A specific analysis
 20   II,     4.  1       |           group that the Baltic and Eastern Europe countries are found
 21   II,     4.  2       |              In several Central and Eastern European (i.e. Bulgaria,
 22   II,     4.  2       |           declined considerably. In Eastern EU countries, life expectancy
 23   II,     4.  2       |    particularly for men. In several Eastern countries mortality of men
 24   II,     4.  2       |         Western, South, Central and Eastern Europe. Therefore, they
 25   II,     4.  2       |     remarkable exception is that in Eastern countries mortality by traffic
 26   II,     4.  2       |           on life expectancy in the Eastern European countries. There
 27   II,     4.  2       |    relatively large in Southern and Eastern European countries and relatively
 28   II,     4.  2       |            both decades. In several Eastern EU countries there was a
 29   II,     4.  2       |            countries except for the Eastern EU countries. Thus it can
 30   II,     4.  2       |       concluded that apart from the Eastern EU countries for men there
 31   II,     4.  2       |            1990s the development in Eastern EU countries has been negative.
 32   II,     4.  2       |             in mortality for men in Eastern European countries.~ ~Figure
 33   II,     4.  2       |      increase since 1970, men.~ ~If Eastern European countries are excluded,
 34   II,     4.  2       |      increase since 1970, excluding Eastern European Countries, men.~ ~
 35   II,     4.  2       |     Countries, men.~ ~If we exclude Eastern European countries for women
 36   II,     4.  2       |      increase since 1970, excluding Eastern European Countries, women.~ ~
 37   II,     4.  2       |            women.~ ~Thus apart from Eastern European countries we may
 38   II,     5.  1.  1   |          cancer diagnosed in men in Eastern and Southern Europe and
 39   II,     5.  2.  1   |           since the mid 70s, but in Eastern Europe mortality has remained
 40   II,     5.  2.  2   |            mortality in Western and Eastern Europe and regional variations [
 41   II,     5.  2.  2   |        Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania), Eastern European countries, distinguished
 42   II,     5.  2.  2   |            distinguished in Central Eastern European countries (Czech Republic,
 43   II,     5.  2.  2   |     GDR-Eastern Germany) and Balkan Eastern European countries (Bulgaria,
 44   II,     5.  2.  2   |              into Baltic countries, Eastern European countries (distinguished
 45   II,     5.  2.  2   |            distinguished in Central Eastern European countries and Balkan
 46   II,     5.  2.  2   |       European countries and Balkan Eastern European countries), Northern
 47   II,     5.  2.  3   |           rates in Baltic1, Central Eastern and Eastern Europe countries (
 48   II,     5.  2.  3   |        Baltic1, Central Eastern and Eastern Europe countries (Table
 49   II,     5.  2.  3   |            100.000), 45% in Central Eastern Europe countries3 (from
 50   II,     5.  2.  3   |            242 per 100.000), 27% in Eastern Europe countries4 (from
 51   II,     5.  2.  3(3)|                             Central Eastern Europe countries include:
 52   II,     5.  2.  3(4)|                                     Eastern Europe countries include:
 53   II,     5.  2.  3   |            100.000), 51% in Central Eastern Europe countries (from 157
 54   II,     5.  2.  3   |             77 per 100.000), 23% in Eastern Europe countries (from 169
 55   II,     5.  2.  3   |     increase since the 90s. Central Eastern and Eastern Europe countries
 56   II,     5.  2.  3   |            90s. Central Eastern and Eastern Europe countries have lower
 57   II,     5.  2.  3   |         Northern, Southern, Central Eastern and Eastern Europe than
 58   II,     5.  2.  3   |       Southern, Central Eastern and Eastern Europe than in Southern
 59   II,     5.  2.  3   |      populations in Baltic, Central Eastern and Eastern countries. Case
 60   II,     5.  2.  3   |         Baltic, Central Eastern and Eastern countries. Case fatality
 61   II,     5.  2.  3   |    populations in Southern, Central Eastern and Eastern Europe countries
 62   II,     5.  2.  3   |       Southern, Central Eastern and Eastern Europe countries than in
 63   II,     5.  2.  3   |             increase was noticed in Eastern European countries up to
 64   II,     5.  2.  3   |         started to decrease also in Eastern European countries (approximately
 65   II,     5.  2.  3   |            100.000), 34% in Central Eastern Europe (from 273 to 180
 66   II,     5.  2.  3   |       Mortality increased by 10% in Eastern Europe (from 324 to 357
 67   II,     5.  2.  3   |           seven times lower than in Eastern Europe countries. Temporal
 68   II,     5.  2.  3   |          rates in Baltic Europe and Eastern Europe.~ ~Figure 5.2.3.
 69   II,     5.  2.  3   |             000) and 37% in Central Eastern Europe (from 193 to 121
 70   II,     5.  2.  3   |           rates increased by 21% in Eastern Europe (from 203 to 246
 71   II,     5.  2.  3   |            four times lower than in Eastern Europe countries.~ ~Figure
 72   II,     5.  2.  3   |      mortality for men and women in Eastern Europe. The political, social
 73   II,     5.  2.  4   |             in Southern, Baltic and Eastern Europe than in Northern
 74   II,     5.  2.  4   |     Southern Europe than in Central Eastern and Eastern countries (see
 75   II,     5.  2.  4   |         than in Central Eastern and Eastern countries (see also Chapter
 76   II,     5.  2.  4   |           Europe and 25% in Central Eastern and Eastern Europe are due
 77   II,     5.  2.  4   |              in Central Eastern and Eastern Europe are due to a history
 78   II,     5.  2.  7   |            mortality in Western and Eastern Union between 1970 and 2000.
 79   II,     5.  3.  3   |            broad geographical area (Eastern Europe: Bulgaria, Czech Republic,
 80   II,     5.  3.  4   |          cancer diagnosed in men in Eastern and Southern Europe and
 81   II,     5.  3.  5   |    mortality rates were reported in Eastern Europe for men (287 deaths
 82   II,     5.  3.  5   |           men with the exception of Eastern Europe and is decreasing
 83   II,     5.  3.  5   |      exception of male incidence in Eastern Europe). Moreover, Eastern
 84   II,     5.  3.  5   |          Eastern Europe). Moreover, Eastern Europe maintains higher
 85   II,     5.  3.  5   |       rather rapidly in Western and Eastern Europe mainly for men (Figure
 86   II,     5.  3.  5   |        while they are increasing in Eastern and Southern Europe.~ ~Figure
 87   II,     5.  3.  5   |             new cases per 100,000). Eastern Europe had maximum levels
 88   II,     5.  3.  5   |         whilst they are constant in Eastern Europe.~ ~Figure 5.3.17.
 89   II,     5.  3.  5   |           Europe, and increasing in Eastern Europe.~ ~Figure 5.3.25.
 90   II,     5.  3.  6   |     Northern, Western, Southern and Eastern Europe).~ ~
 91   II,     5.  3.  6   |        Germany, the United Kingdom, Eastern Europe, Nordic countries,
 92   II,     5.  3.  6   |             50% to 66%) occurred in Eastern Europe although still under
 93   II,     5.  3.  6   |           survival were reported in Eastern Europe (Sant et al, 2003).~ ~
 94   II,     5.  3.  6   |            hand the UK, Denmark and Eastern European countries, i.e
 95   II,     5.  3.  6   |             between 25 and 35% - in Eastern Europe (Estonia, Poland,
 96   II,     5.  3.  6   |         cancer survival was seen in Eastern Europe (Estonia, Poland,
 97   II,     5.  3.  6   |       survival were less evident in Eastern European countries; actually ,
 98   II,     5.  3.  6   |          actually , the gap between Eastern and Western European countries
 99   II,     5.  3.  6   |          most countries, but not in Eastern European countries, where
100   II,     5.  3.  6   |             is still higher than in Eastern European countries where
101   II,     5.  3.  6   |           and Denmark, and worse in Eastern Europe. All-cancer survival
102   II,     5.  3.  6   |     European countries and lower in Eastern European countries, although,
103   II,     5.  3.  6   |    countries, although, patients in Eastern Europe had the highest improvement
104   II,     5.  3.  7   |            of cervical screening in Eastern Europe is one of the major
105   II,     5.  3.  8   |            in Europe (especially in Eastern European countries)~ ~Medium
106   II,     5.  4.  1   |           the highest rates are the Eastern Mediterranean and Middle
107   II,     5.  5.Int   |           numbers of people in some Eastern European countries, but
108   II,     5.  5.  1   |        Latvia) and some Central and Eastern European countries (Romania,
109   II,     5.  5.  2   |       Western Europe (Region A) and Eastern Europe (Regions B and C)23. ~ ~
110   II,     5.  5.  2   |             into Western Europe and Eastern Europe, with a further division
111   II,     5.  5.  2   |          with a further division in Eastern Europe between countries
112   II,     5.  5.  3   |         study involving Western and Eastern European countries (RESt-1
113   II,     5.  5.  3   |            from several Western and Eastern European countries (RESt-1
114   II,     5.  5.  3   |         particularly in Central and Eastern Europe, where unemployment
115   II,     5.  5.  3   |  assessments conducted in northern, eastern and central Spain found
116   II,     5.  5.  3   |       Western nations to developing Eastern nations.~ ~In addition,
117   II,     5.  8.  3   |             disease; in Central and Eastern Europe lost work days due
118   II,     5.  9. FB   |         compared to those living in Eastern European countries. Changes
119   II,     5. 11.  3   |      mortality was higher in men in eastern and southern Europe. Mortality
120   II,     5. 11.  3   |           Western Europe whereas in eastern and southern Europe both
121   II,     5. 12.  1   |           and mostly in Central and Eastern Europe reaching rates over
122   II,     5. 12.  3   |       Finland), the UK, central and Eastern European countries (Bulgaria,
123   II,     5. 12.  3   |           rates have been rising in Eastern European countries (such
124   II,     5. 12.  3   |          countries from central and Eastern Europe (e.g., Hungary, Romania,
125   II,     5. 12.  4   |            countries of Central and Eastern Europe (Hungary, Romania,
126   II,     5. 12.  4   |        level reached in central and Eastern European countries – are
127   II,     5. 12.  5   |     importance in areas of central, Eastern and Northern Europe, where
128   II,     5. 14.  2   |           developed in southern and Eastern Europe but progress have
129   II,     5. 14.  3   |           is shown also for certain Eastern European countries where
130   II,     5. 14.  3   |         high in most of Central and Eastern Europe but, equally important,
131   II,     5. 14.  3   |            28% when compared to the Eastern European countries where
132   II,     5. 14.  3   |            and political changes in Eastern Europe, oral health systems
133   II,     5. 14.  3   |         previous twelve months~ ~In Eastern Europe, many children attend
134   II,     5. 14.  3   |       Recent surveys carried out in Eastern Europe revealed that the
135   II,     6.  3.  7   |              including southern and eastern Europe. Humans become infected
136   II,     8.  2.  2   |          care service transition in Eastern Europe. IAPB Newsletter
137   II,     9           |            cardiovascular deaths in Eastern European countries are a
138   II,     9.  3.  1   |           numbers of people in some Eastern European countries, but
139   II,     9.  3.  1   |          intravenous drug, while in Eastern Europe they are iatrogenic
140   II,     9.  3.  1   |            cardiovascular deaths in Eastern European countries are a
141   II,     9.  3.  1   |           cardiovascular disease in Eastern Europe: explaining the paradox.
142   II,     9.  3.  1   |            countries of central and Eastern Europe that are candidates
143   II,     9.  5.  1   |      countries and 75 for males. In Eastern Europe and Romania, this
144   II,     9.  5.  3   |         perhaps as high as 10.7% in Eastern Europe. Men are generally
145  III,    10.  2.  1   |          both males and females. In Eastern Europe, mortality for males
146  III,    10.  2.  1   |             Northern, as well as in Eastern and Western Europe.~ ~In
147  III,    10.  2.  1   |          and the UK. In central and eastern European countries the awareness
148  III,    10.  2.  1   |      difference between central and eastern Europe (Poland, Czech Republic,
149  III,    10.  2.  1   |        injuries, in the central and eastern European countries, the
150  III,    10.  2.  1   |     complemented by the Central and Eastern Eurobarometer series, at
151  III,    10.  2.  1   |           rising, with those in the eastern part of the Region being
152  III,    10.  3.  2   |            Environment Agency~EECCA~Eastern Europe. Caucasus and Central
153  III,    10.  4.  1   |            Environment Agency~EECCA~Eastern Europe. Caucasus and Central
154  III,    10.  4.  1   |     relatively less frequent in the eastern parts of Europe, although
155  III,    10.  4.  2   |         animals and wildlife in the eastern part of the EU is of some
156  III,    10.  4.  3   |      drinking-water is lower in the eastern part of the Region, but
157  III,    10.  4.  3   |         European Region (especially Eastern Europe and Central Asia),
158  III,    10.  4.  3   |             the authorities. In the eastern part of the European Region,
159  III,    10.  4.  3   |        urban areas, particularly in eastern Europe and central Asia.
160  III,    10.  4.  5   |            Environment Agency~EECCA~Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central
161  III,    10.  4.  5   |       Assessment~SEE~South East and Eastern Europe Switzerland and Liechtenstein)~
162  III,    10.  4.  5   |  groundwater contamination in South Eastern Europe (EEA 2007b). There
163  III,    10.  4.  5   |             waste per capita.~· the Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central
164  III,    10.  4.  5   |            growing from 21%-35%. In Eastern European countries, the
165  III,    10.  4.  5   |          hand, in most countries of Eastern and South-Eastern Europe,
166  III,    10.  5.  1   |         concentrated in Central and Eastern Europe. Despite the small
167  III,    10.  5.  1   |    Cockroaches in Three Central and Eastern European (CEE) Cities. Journal
168  III,    10.  6.  1   |           prospective evidence from Eastern Finland. Am J Epidemiol
169  III,    10.  6.  2   |   inequalities in mortality were in Eastern Europe at least as big,
170  III,    10.  6.  2   |            78 per cent in the three Eastern European countries, as compared
171  III,    10.  6.  2   |            similar magnitude in the Eastern as compared to the Western
172  III,    10.  6.  2   |   dramatically in many countries in Eastern Europe, sometimes for the
173  III,    10.  6.  2   |            Evidence from some other Eastern European countries (Hungary)
174   IV,    11.Acr       |            Countries of central and Eastern Europe~CPD~Continuing Professional
175   IV,    11.  1.  3   |            Countries of central and Eastern Europe (CEE) paint a distinct
176   IV,    11.  1.  3   |           efficiency in central and Eastern Europe involving, among
177   IV,    11.  1.  3   |            between countries. While Eastern European countries spend
178   IV,    11.  1.  6   |           Care). In the Central and Eastern European countries that
179   IV,    11.  2.  1   |            Countries in central and Eastern Europe, notably the Czech Republic,
180   IV,    11.  2.  1   |            also in some central and Eastern European countries (McDaid
181   IV,    11.  3.  2   |            countries in central and Eastern Europe and all countries
182   IV,    11.  3.  2   |          widely used in central and Eastern European countries, including
183   IV,    11.  3.  2   |         Denmark, Ireland and Italy. Eastern European pharmaceutical
184   IV,    11.  6.  1   |            growth, many central and Eastern European countries witnessed
185   IV,    11.  6.  1   |            countries of central and Eastern Europe. Though levels of
186   IV,    11.  6.  2   |            countries of central and Eastern Europe in the 1990s where
187   IV,    11.  6.  2   |           Belgium), the central and Eastern European region shows a
188   IV,    11.  6.  2   |           payments~ ~In central and Eastern European countries there
189   IV,    11.  6.  3   |            countries of central and Eastern Europe, it can be estimated
190   IV,    11.  6.  4   |            countries of central and Eastern Europe (Thomson et al 2004).
191   IV,    11.  6.  5   |   multicountry study in central and Eastern europe. Cambridge, Harvard
192   IV,    11.  6.  5   |    financing reforms in central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet
193   IV,    12.  8       |     investment in particular in the Eastern European countries. The
194   IV,    13.  5       |     reversals have e.g. occurred in Eastern Europe. A deteriorating
195  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0   |           earnings~earring~earrings~eastern~eating~ebola~ebolavirus~