Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  5    |       cardiovascular mortality (Finnish Heart Association, 2005). These
  2    I,     2. 11    |            Available at: htt ~ ~Finnish Heart Association (2005): Action
  3    I,     2. 11    |              Plan for Promoting Finnish Heart Health for the Years 2005-
  4    I,     2. 11    |                 2011. Helsinki, Finnish Heart Association. Available at: htt df~
  5   II,     4.  2    |                 decline in mortality in heart disease and cerebrovascular
  6   II,     4.  2    |                in the 1970s. For women, heart and cerebrovascular disease
  7   II,     4.  2    |                 decline in mortality by heart and cerebrovascular diseases
  8   II,     4.  2    |                in mortality by ischemic heart disease was particularly
  9   II,     4.  2    |                in mortality by ischemic heart disease continued to be
 10   II,     4.  2    |                decrease in mortality by heart and cerebrovascular disease
 11   II,     4.  2    |        importance of ischemic and other heart diseases and strokes. Changes
 12   II,     5.  1.  1|              health problems, including heart disease, stroke, obstructive
 13   II,     5.  2.Acr|               Bypass Graft~CHD~Coronary Heart Disease~CT-Scan~Computed
 14   II,     5.  2.Acr|                 of Disease~IHD~Ischemic Heart Disease~LDL~Low Density
 15   II,     5.  2.  1|                459) consist of ischemic heart diseases including myocardial
 16   II,     5.  2.  1|                 origin such as ischemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke.
 17   II,     5.  2.  1|               IHD) and stroke. Ischemic heart disease and stroke, are
 18   II,     5.  2.  1|             currently die from ischemic heart disease (IHD) and one in
 19   II,     5.  2.  2|                       5.2.2.1. Ischemic heart disease~ ~Mortality~EUROSTAT
 20   II,     5.  2.  2|                  Other data, such as on heart failure and arrhythmias,
 21   II,     5.  2.  2|               published by the European Heart Network and come from the
 22   II,     5.  2.  3|                       5.2.3.1. Ischemic heart disease~ ~Mortality~ ~CVD
 23   II,     5.  2.  3|                   Table 5.2.1. Ischemic heart diseases (codes ICD-9: 410-
 24   II,     5.  2.  3|                000. Trends for ischemic heart diseases (codes ICD-9 410-
 25   II,     5.  2.  3|                000. Trends for ischemic heart diseases (codes ICD-9 410-
 26   II,     5.  2.  3| hospitalizations for other CVD, such as heart failure and arrhythmias,
 27   II,     5.  2.  3|             Case fatality from coronary heart disease (CHD) was higher
 28   II,     5.  2.  4|               see the attached European Heart Health Charter Annex 1).
 29   II,     5.  2.  4|        continent, estimated that 22% of heart attacks in Western Europe
 30   II,     5.  2.  4|                  between 45% and 35% of heart attacks are due to abnormal
 31   II,     5.  2.  4|                almost twice the risk of heart attack compared to those
 32   II,     5.  2.  5|               on Prevention of coronary heart disease distinguished (WHO,
 33   II,     5.  2.  5|               spelt out in the European Heart Health Charter and its working
 34   II,     5.  2.  5|                of Cardiac Societies and Heart Foundations, present at
 35   II,     5.  2.  5|             Cardiology and the European Heart Network, with a special
 36   II,     5.  2.  5|           December 2006)~· The European Heart Health Charter was developed
 37   II,     5.  2.  5|               WHO-Europe), the European Heart Network and the European
 38   II,     5.  2.  5|              Cardiology.~· The European Heart Health Charter was officially
 39   II,     5.  2.  6|         specific mortality for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) (Keys A et
 40   II,     5.  2.  6|                  diabetes, and coronary heart disease: insights from the
 41   II,     5.  2.  6|                the Framingham Study. Am Heart J 110: 1100-1107.~Kannel
 42   II,     5.  2.  6|             studies related to coronary heart disease: characteristics
 43   II,     5.  2.  6|                and the risk of coronary heart disease and mortality in
 44   II,     5.  2.  6|           premature death from coronary heart disease continuous and graded?
 45   II,     5.  2.  7|                  executive summary. Eur Heart J 28: 2375-414~Greenland
 46   II,     5.  2.  7|             fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease events. JAMA 290:
 47   II,     5.  2.  7|              between 1970 and 2000. Eur Heart J 27: 107-113.~Kuulasmaa
 48   II,     5.  2.  7|            profile and 10-year coronary heart disease incidence in women
 49   II,     5.  2.  7|                 mortality from ischemic heart disease and other cardiovascular
 50   II,     5.  2.  7|               statistics in Europe. Eur Heart J 18: 1231–48.~Sarti C,
 51   II,     5.  2.  7|            International mortality from heart disease: rates and trends.
 52   II,     5.  2.  7|            mortality and mortality from heart disease in 26 countries
 53   II,     5.  2.  7|            rates to changes in coronary heart disease mortality: 10-year
 54   II,     5.  2.  7|               event rates, and coronary heart disease mortality across
 55   II,     5.  2.  7|                  Prevention of coronary heart disease. WHO Technical report
 56   II,     5.  4.  1|               blood vessels, nerves and heart. Microvascular complications (
 57   II,     5.  4.  2|               and amputation aggravated heart disease and stroke, - should
 58   II,     5.  5.  1|           attributable, for example, to heart diseases and diabetes.~ ~
 59   II,     5.  5.  2|       cardio-vascular diseases (British Heart Foundation, 2008; EPHA,
 60   II,     5.  5.  2|   riskreductionbooklet.pdf]~ ~ ~British Heart Foundation (2008): Keeping
 61   II,     5.  5.  2|         Foundation (2008): Keeping your heart healthy, Available at: htt x (
 62   II,     5.  5.  3|             ears), and may also develop heart problems.~· People with
 63   II,     5.  5.  3|             quite sociable and may have heart problems.~· Childhood disintegrative
 64   II,     5.  6.  3|            mental retardation. Coronary heart diseases and other circulatory
 65   II,     5.  7.  7|                 general population. Eur Heart J 2006 May;27(10):1245-50.~
 66   II,     5.  7.  7|             statement from the American Heart Association Councils on
 67   II,     5.  8.  3|             hypertension and consequent heart failure.~• Co-incidental
 68   II,     5.  8.  3|        cardiovascular disease, ischemic heart disease, lung cancer and
 69   II,     5.  8.  5|                tuberculosis, congestive heart failure (CHF), obliterative
 70   II,     5. 11.  1|             ranging from dehydration to heart failure, septicaemia and
 71   II,     5. 14.  4|              health problems, including heart disease, stroke, obstructive
 72   II,     6.  3.  4|               ages, such as diabetes or heart disease). There is a WHO
 73   II,     8.  1.  3|              indicated diabetes, chest, heart, and stomach problems, 4%
 74   II,     8.  1.  3|            affected by diabetes, chest, heart and stomach problems; and
 75   II,     9        |              eye defects and congenital heart disease. Monitoring of vaccination
 76   II,     9        |                 prevalence of ischaemic heart disease (Fig.9.T1.4).~ ~ ~
 77   II,     9        |              death rates from ischaemic heart disease in the European
 78   II,     9        |             risk of developing coronary heart disease, including those
 79   II,     9.  1.  2|             e.g. surgery for congenital heart disease) and e) practices
 80   II,     9.  1.  2|      chromosomal anomalies). Congenital heart disease is the most common
 81   II,     9.  1.  2|                prevalence of congenital heart disease (Figure 9.1.2.1),
 82   II,     9.  1.  2|                mortality are congenital heart disease (23% of perinatal
 83   II,     9.  1.  2|                deaths, while congenital heart disease contributes more
 84   II,     9.  1.  2|         educational needs.~ ~Congenital heart disease~ ~The live birth
 85   II,     9.  1.  2|                prevalence of congenital heart disease is 6.1 per 1 000
 86   II,     9.  1.  2|                prevalence of congenital heart disease has been increasing (
 87   II,     9.  1.  2|               referral of babies with a heart murmur for early echography.
 88   II,     9.  1.  2|                early echography. Severe heart defects are quite commonly
 89   II,     9.  1.  2|                 73% of hypoplastic left heart (EUROCAT, 2007). TOPFA is
 90   II,     9.  1.  2|               not common for congenital heart disease, unless the heart
 91   II,     9.  1.  2|               heart disease, unless the heart defect is associated with
 92   II,     9.  1.  2|              eye defects and congenital heart disease. Monitoring of vaccination
 93   II,     9.  1.  2|              for example for congenital heart defects, diaphragmatic hernia
 94   II,     9.  1.  2|                Based Study", Congenital Heart Diseases, Vol 2, pp 165-
 95   II,     9.  3.  1|               osteoporosis and coronary heart disease (CHD). Studies of
 96   II,     9.  3.  1|             women are protected against heart diseases before menopause
 97   II,     9.  3.  1|       circulatory diseases are ischemic heart disease, responsible of
 98   II,     9.  3.  1|             women are protected against heart disease before menopause
 99   II,     9.  3.  1|             woman who has a stroke or a heart attackespecially when
100   II,     9.  3.  1|                 of repeated attacks and heart failure, which in turn leads
101   II,     9.  3.  1|           increased morbidity (European Heart Network, 2005). Research
102   II,     9.  3.  1|                men with suspected acute heart attack symptoms are referred
103   II,     9.  3.  1|               men who test positive for heart disease are recommended
104   II,     9.  3.  1|                diabetic women (European Heart Network, 2006). Hormonal
105   II,     9.  3.  1|              due to pulmonary embolism, heart failure, rhythm disorders,
106   II,     9.  3.  1|       circulatory diseases are ischemic heart disease (which comprises
107   II,     9.  3.  1|           reduce the incidence of major heart attacks in women with heart
108   II,     9.  3.  1|             heart attacks in women with heart disease and improve survival
109   II,     9.  3.  1|                older patients (European Heart Network, 2005). The prevalence
110   II,     9.  3.  1|               renal failure.~ ~Ischemic heart disease. Ischemic heart
111   II,     9.  3.  1|                 heart disease. Ischemic heart disease, in addition to
112   II,     9.  3.  1|              may have a higher coronary heart diseases (CHD) mortality
113   II,     9.  3.  1|                 prevalence of ischaemic heart disease (Fig.9.T1.4).~ ~
114   II,     9.  3.  1|              death rates from ischaemic heart disease in the European
115   II,     9.  3.  1|                   p. 305-311.~ ~British Heart Foundation: Heartstats http 5 (
116   II,     9.  3.  1|              accessed 01.07)~ ~European Heart Network/European Health
117   II,     9.  3.  1|                Squibb (2005); A healthy heart for European women. www g (
118   II,     9.  4.  2|                 years old). The British Heart Foundation provides a comprehensive
119   II,     9.  4.  2|           disability, such as stroke or heart attack, can affect the individual120   II,     9.  4.  3|              more likely to suffer from heart disease and stroke, but
121   II,     9.  4.  3|               too. The common view that heart disease and stroke are exclusively
122   II,     9.  4.  3|              category includes ischemic heart diseases and other heart
123   II,     9.  4.  3|                heart diseases and other heart diseases as well as stroke
124   II,     9.  4.  3|                  Morbidity for Coronary Heart Disease appears to be increasing
125   II,     9.  4.  3|               from the disease (British Heart Foundation, 2001).~ ~Cerebro-vascular
126   II,     9.  4.  4|             risk of developing coronary heart disease, including those
127   II,     9.  4.  7|             accessed 09.07.07~ ~British Heart Foundation (2001): Coronary
128   II,     9.  4.  7|             Foundation (2001): Coronary Heart Disease Statistics: Morbidity
129   II,     9.  4.  8|  immunodeficiency syndrome~CHD~Coronary Heart Disease~DoH~Department of
130   II,     9.  5.  6|                Men. Brussels~ ~European Heart Network/European Health
131   II,     9.  5.  6|                Squibb (2005): A healthy heart for European women. Available
132  III,    10.  1    |                  respiratory disease or heart disease and people with
133  III,    10.  1.  1|                 as the risk of coronary heart disease (Fagard, 2005; Wood,
134  III,    10.  1.  1|           joints or lead to substantial heart rate increases.~ ~Figure
135  III,    10.  1.  3|          Disease in the Young, American Heart Association. Circulation
136  III,    10.  1.  3|             statement from the American Heart Association Council on Nutrition,
137  III,    10.  2.  1|               myeloid leukemia~Coronary heart disease~Asthma*~Coronary
138  III,    10.  2.  1|                disease~Asthma*~Coronary heart disease~Stomach~Pneumonia~
139  III,    10.  2.  1|                factors causing ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular
140  III,    10.  2.  1|               pressure, respiration and heart rate (NID ~ ~Nicotine has
141  III,    10.  2.  1|             cohort study 1984-1992. Eur Heart J, 1998; 19: 1997-1207.~ ~
142  III,    10.  2.  1|              Concentration~CHD~Coronary Heart Disease~CHOICE~CHOsing Interventions
143  III,    10.  2.  1|                    The risk of coronary heart disease decreases to about
144  III,    10.  2.  1|          drinking increases the risk of heart arrhythmias and sudden coronary
145  III,    10.  2.  1|                evidence of pre-existing heart disease.~ ~Alcohol shows
146  III,    10.  2.  1|             young people, as opposed to heart disease later in life.~ ~
147  III,    10.  2.  1|               diseases such as ischemic heart disease and self-inflicted
148  III,    10.  2.  1|              across the EU15), ischemic heart diseases (northern Europe)
149  III,    10.  2.  1|               diseases such as obesity, heart disease, stroke, cancers,
150  III,    10.  2.  1|               diseases such as obesity, heart disease, stroke, cancers,
151  III,    10.  2.  1|                 substantial increase in heart rate (WHO, 2006a). Health-enhancing
152  III,    10.  2.  1|         increases the risk for coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes,
153  III,    10.  2.  1|              studies~ ~- European Youth Heart study (Riddoch CJ et al.,
154  III,    10.  2.  1|               of cases of both ischemic heart disease and ischemic stroke,
155  III,    10.  2.  2|         specific mortality for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). Subsequently,
156  III,    10.  2.  4|              multiple myeloma, coronary heart diseases, pre-menopausal
157  III,    10.  3.  1|             blood pressure and ischemic heart disease: a meta-analysis.
158  III,    10.  3.  4|                 arise from drowning and heart attacks. For what concerns
159  III,    10.  4.  2|         incident involving~clenbuterol: heart rhythm~disorders, neurological~
160  III,    10.  5.  1|            health considerations at the heart of all urban planning and
161  III,    10.  5.  2|                chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke and mental
162  III,    10.  5.  3|                European Union. European Heart Journal 27:1610-1619.~Martikainen,
163  III,    10.  6.  1|             chances of survival after a heart attack, even when adjusting
164  III,    10.  6.  1|              increased risk of coronary heart disease (De Vogli et al.,
165  III,    10.  6.  1|          aspects of close relations and heart disease. Arch Intern Med
166   IV,    11.  1.  5|             treatments (as for coronary heart disease in the UK GP contract).
167   IV,    11.  2.  1|           premature deaths from asthma, heart disease, cerebrovascular
168   IV,    11.  5.  1|             such as the liver, lung and heart, it is the only available
169   IV,    11.  5.  1|        expanding to the field of liver, heart, lung and tissue transplantation.~ ~
170   IV,    11.  5.  2|              International Registry for Heart and Lung Transplantation: htt
171   IV,    11.  5.  4|               rates while waiting for a heart, liver or lung transplant
172   IV,    11.  5.  5|              are: expanding donor pool (heart beating and non heart beating
173   IV,    11.  5.  5|             pool (heart beating and non heart beating deceased donors,
174   IV,    12.  2    |                of Cardiac Societies and Heart Foundations, present at
175   IV,    12.  2    |             Cardiology and the European Heart Network, with a special
176   IV,    12.  2    |               WHO-Europe), the European Heart Network and the European
177   IV,    12.  2    |                Cardiology, the European Heart Health Charter was developed.~ ~
178   IV,    12.  2    |               developed.~ ~The European Heart Health Charter has been
179   IV,    12.  2    |               spelt out in the European Heart Health Charter and its working
180   IV,    12. 10    |                         obesity http l~ heart disease. htt ~- Addressing
181   IV,    12. 10    |             organized within the “World Heart Day”, with participants
182   IV,    13.  2.  3|                 respiratory disease, or heart disease and people with
183   IV,    13.  2.  3|         Netherlands, including coronary heart diseases and depression.
184   IV,    13.  2.  3|            physical activity~ ~Coronary heart diseases,~Depression, lung
185   IV,    13.  7    |        end-stage renal, liver, lung and heart failure.~ ~
186   IV,    13.  7.  3|                 cancers in infants, and heart transplantation in children),
187  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|             health21~healthcare~hearing~heart~heatwave~heatwaves~helicobacter~