Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    -,     1           |         from a few exceptions, each Chapter of this Report, constituting
  2    I,     2.  1       |            2.1. Introduction~ ~This Chapter deals with a number of demographic,
  3    I,     2.  9       |            fires) are dealt with in Chapter 10.~ ~ ~
  4   II,     4.  1       |           in good health.~ ~In this chapter we present the first HLY
  5   II,     5.  2.  3   |             cancer.~As explained in chapter 5.2.2Data sources’, it
  6   II,     5.  2.  3   |          age of 75. As explained in chapter 4.2.2Data sources’, it
  7   II,     5.  2.  4   |         Eastern countries (see also Chapter 8).~ ~Table 5.2.7. Estimated
  8   II,     5.  2.  4   |            Panico et al, 2008) (see Chapter 5.1.4). Recent evidence
  9   II,     5.  2.  4   |        predicting CV risk (see also Chapter 10).~ ~Table 5.2.10. Estimated
 10   II,     5.  2.  4   |             never been smokers (see Chapter 5.1.2.).~Unfortunately,
 11   II,     5.  3.  1   |    Capocaccia et al, 2003), in this chapter cancer outcome indicators
 12   II,     5.  3.  2   |        networks and projects~ ~This chapter uses data, information and
 13   II,     5.  3.  4   |             included in the present chapter.~ ~Stomach cancer: It has
 14   II,     5.  3.  7   |           Boyle et al, 2003).~ ~See Chapter 10 for primary prevention
 15   II,     5.  3.  7   |             For further details see Chapter 4.14.~ ~
 16   II,     5.  4.  6   |             healthy lifestyles. See Chapter 5.13. on overweight and
 17   II,     5.  4.  6   |           and high cholesterol, see Chapter 5.2.4. and for other risk
 18   II,     5.  4.  6   |          for other risk factors see Chapter 10.~To prevent the occurrence
 19   II,     5.  4.  7   |             as shown before in this chapter, have paved the ground for
 20   II,     5.  5.  1   |             survey are presented in Chapter 5.5.1. Mental Disorders.
 21   II,     5.  5.  1   |          are presented in detail in Chapter 5.5.1. Mental Disorders.
 22   II,     5.  5.  1   |         presented in more detail in Chapter 5.5.1. Mood Disorders.~ ~ ~
 23   II,     5.  5.  2   |           well-being in later life, Chapter 6, available at: htt m (
 24   II,     5.  5.  3   |          from the 2001/2002 survey, chapter 3, 110-129. WHO Library
 25   II,     5.  5.  3   |             to ICD-10/F20, i.e. the chapter including schizophrenia,
 26   II,     5.  5.  3   |      actively screened for; in this chapter we have highlighted the
 27   II,     5.  6.  1   |    biopsychosocial mechanisms. This chapter will consider musculoskeletal
 28   II,     5.  6.  2   |         2005)~ ~The content of this chapter uses material and data from
 29   II,     5.  6.  6   |          Mosby-Elsevier; Section C, Chapter 1.~Zollman C, Vickers A (
 30   II,     5.  7.  5   |            Primary prevention~ ~See Chapter 8~ ~Secondary prevention~ ~
 31   II,     5.  7.  6   |       donation rates ( see also the Chapter 9.2. on Transplants).~ ~
 32   II,     5.  9.  2   |         which are dealt with in the chapter, with reference to ICD 9:~·
 33   II,     5.  9.  5   |   lifestyles or the environment see Chapter 5. A key message related
 34   II,     5. 11.  2   |            2. Data sources~ ~ ~This chapter is based on data and information
 35   II,     5. 11.  3   |             tumours and others (See Chapter 4.3).~Some skin diseases
 36   II,     5. 11.  3   |            Lidén, M Bruze, T Menné, Chapter 41 Metals. In: Textbook
 37   II,     5. 11.  3   |      European enterprises (see also Chapter 7 on “Rare Diseases”).~ ~
 38   II,     5. 12.  1   |       causing liver cirrhosis, this Chapter can be read in connection
 39   II,     5. 12.  1   |            the relevant Sections of Chapter 6.~ ~
 40   II,     5. 12.  4   |            HCV) infection (see also Chapter 6) and alcohol drinking (
 41   II,     5. 12.  4   |   association with HBV and HCV (see Chapter 6), cirrhosis mortality
 42   II,     5. 12.  5   |             of HBV vaccination (sse Chapter 6), control of HCV transmission (
 43   II,     5. 12.  5   |            of HCV transmission (see Chapter 6) and of alcohol drinking.~ ~
 44   II,     5. 12.  5   |             European countries.~See Chapter 8 for what concerns prevention
 45   II,     5. 12.  5   |        disease and death ( see also Chapter 6).~ ~There is inadequate
 46   II,     5. 13       |          diseases are dealt with in Chapter 10.2.1.7 in view of the
 47   II,     5. 13       |          the quoted references, see Chapter 10.2.1.7.~ ~ ~
 48   II,     5. 14.  5   |          the control of smoking see Chapter 8; for the control of excessive
 49   II,     5. 14.  5   |             alcohol consumption see Chapter 8 ; and for diabetes mellitus
 50   II,     5. 14.  5   |           for diabetes mellitus see Chapter 5.4.~It is possible to develop
 51   II,     6.  1       |            6.1. Introduction~ ~This chapter gives an overview and outlines
 52   II,     6.  1       |           the main purposes of this chapter is to identify those diseases
 53   II,     7.  1       |            Promotion, 2008).~ ~This chapter provides the most recent
 54   II,     7.  1       |            elderly citizens.~ ~This chapter provides a general overview
 55   II,     7.  1       |             Council Recommendation (chapterdata discussion”), and
 56   II,     7.  2.  1   |            and injuries~ ~ICD-10:~- Chapter XIX: Injury, poisoning and
 57   II,     7.  2.  1   |      external causes ~ (S00-T98).~- Chapter XX: External causes of morbidity
 58   II,     7.  2.  1   |      mortality (V01-Y98)~ ~ICD-9:~- Chapter 17 on INJURY AND POISONING (
 59   II,     7.  2.  1   |          with respect to the ICD-10 chapter XX; ICECI does not replace
 60   II,     7.  2.  1   |           does not replace this ICD chapter but rather includes the
 61   II,     7.  2.  2   |      discharges by diagnosis (ICD10 Chapter XIX) and average length
 62   II,     7.  2.  2   |      accidents and injuries - ICD10 Chapter XX – is only sporadically
 63   II,     7.  3       |           main data source for this chapter is the “Report on Injuries
 64   II,     7.  3       |          The figures stated in this chapter represent a yearly average
 65   II,     7.  3.  4   |            figures are described in Chapter 6.2. Figure 7.12. Non-fatal
 66   II,     7.  3.  4   |             etc. (see also “IDB” in Chapter 6.2).~ ~
 67   II,     7.  4       |          The survey of the previous chapter clearly shows the public
 68   II,     7.  4       |             detail later on in this chapter:~ ~· Children and adolescents;~·
 69   II,     8.  2.  1   |         References included in this Chapter represent recent studies
 70   II,     8.  2.  1   |        health inequalities (see the chapter on policies related to overall
 71   II,     9           |       GENDER~POPULATION GROUPS~This chapter deals with the main health
 72   II,     9           |             anomalies are listed in Chapter 9.1.2; references cited
 73   II,     9           |            paragraphs are listed in Chapter 9.1.1~ ~ ~ ~Table 9.1b.
 74   II,     9           |            this table are listed in Chapter 9.2~ ~ ~Table 9.1c. Main
 75   II,     9           |            this table are listed in Chapter 9.3.1~ ~ ~Table 9.1d. Main
 76   II,     9           |            this table are listed in Chapter 9.4~ ~ ~ ~
 77   II,     9.  1       |       nearly half of the cases (see chapter 9.3.2).~ ~This burden of
 78   II,     9.  1.  1   |      Congenital malformations~ ~See Chapter 9.1.2 for a detailed and
 79   II,     9.  1.  1   |            in EU Member States. See Chapter 9.3.2 for more information.~ ~ ~
 80   II,     9.  1.  1   |          the data presented in this chapter reveal significant geographic
 81   II,     9.  1.  1   | reproduction issues is presented in Chapter 9.3.2~ ~
 82   II,     9.  1.  2   |       elsewhere in this Report (see Chapter 5). Metabolic diseases diagnosed
 83   II,     9.  1.  2   |           Their data can be seen in Chapter 4.1. Such infant mortality
 84   II,     9.  1.  2   |             Europe is documented in Chapter 8. Figure 9.1.2.2 shows
 85   II,     9.  1.  2   |             anomalies are listed in Chapter 9.1.2; references cited
 86   II,     9.  1.  2   |            paragraphs are listed in Chapter 9.1.1~ ~ ~ ~ ~
 87   II,     9.  1.  2   |             Most rare diseases (see Chapter 5.15) are congenital. The
 88   II,     9.  2.  3   |      countries in recent years (see Chapter 4.1). Congenital malformations
 89   II,     9.  2.  3   |          mortality in neonates (see Chapter 4.2), and accidents for
 90   II,     9.  2.  3   |             for 5-14 year olds (see Chapter 7).~ ~Cancer: Tumors recognized
 91   II,     9.  2.  3   |         adolescents can be found in chapter9.3.3. Sexual health”~ ~
 92   II,     9.  2.  3   |         health (WHO 2005c)(see also Chapter 9.3).~ ~The incidence rate
 93   II,     9.  2.  3   |          type two diabetes(see also Chapter 5).~ ~Excess body weight
 94   II,     9.  2.  4   |            this table are listed in Chapter 9.2~ ~ ~
 95   II,     9.  2.  5   |            for specific diseases in Chapter 5 and for specific health
 96   II,     9.  2.  5   |     specific health determinants in Chapter 10.~ ~Healthcare and services~ ~
 97   II,     9.  3.  1   |       issues not dealt with in this Chapter see Chapter 9.5.~ ~ ~
 98   II,     9.  3.  1   |            with in this Chapter see Chapter 9.5.~ ~ ~
 99   II,     9.  3.  1   |            and women is provided in chapter 9.5.~ ~As compared to women,
100   II,     9.  3.  1   |         data bases utilised in this chapter also include WHOSIS, GLOBOCAN,
101   II,     9.  3.  1   |           as compared to women (see Chapter on Accidents), with the
102   II,     9.  3.  1   |       cancer types are described in Chapter 5.3.~ ~Circulatory diseases~ ~
103   II,     9.  3.  1   |           diseases are described in Chapter 5.2.~ ~A man with metabolic
104   II,     9.  3.  1   |            this table are listed in Chapter 9.3.1~ ~ ~ ~
105   II,     9.  3.  1   |            for specific diseases in Chapter 5 and for specific health
106   II,     9.  3.  1   |     specific health determinants in Chapter 10. For issues concerning
107   II,     9.  3.  1   |      concerning health services see Chapter 11.~ ~
108   II,     9.  3.  2   |       health have been presented in Chapter 9.1.1.2.~ ~
109   II,     9.  3.  3   |             sources for the present chapter are:~ ~· The European Concerted
110   II,     9.  3.  3   |         violence is included in the Chapter dedicated to “Special gender-related
111   II,     9.  4.  3   |             risk factor in men (see chapter on dementia for further
112   II,     9.  4.  4   |            this table are listed in Chapter 9.4~ ~ ~ ~
113   II,     9.  4.  5   |            for specific diseases in Chapter 5 and for specific health
114   II,     9.  4.  5   |     specific health determinants in Chapter 10.~ ~As far as control
115  III,    10.  2.  1   |           deaths in both sexes (see Chapter 5.2.). Smoking contributes
116  III,    10.  2.  1   |            al., 1998).~Cancers (see Chapter 5.3) of the respiratory
117  III,    10.  2.  1   |          Mortality due to COPD (see Chapter 5.7) varies from country
118  III,    10.  2.  1(2)|                Not analyzed in this chapter.~
119  III,    10.  2.  1   |               Data provided in this chapter, unless otherwise indicated,
120  III,    10.  2.  1   |            behaviour is provided in chapter 9.3.3., within the more
121  III,    10.  2.  1   |         study will be used for this chapter (Fig. 2 and 3).~ ~Selected
122  III,    10.  2.  2   |         details and references, see Chapter 5.2.~ ~ ~
123  III,    10.  2.  3   |         details and references, see Chapter 5.2.~ ~ ~
124  III,    10.  2.  4   |           be described later in the Chapter no indicators for the implementation
125  III,    10.  2.  4   |         rare genetic disorders (see Chapter 7 on Rare Diseases). These
126  III,    10.  2.  5   |            different age groups see Chapter 9.~ ~
127  III,    10.  3.  1   |             remains unclear.~ ~This chapter deals with different types
128  III,    10.  3.  2   |           and pharmaceuticals. This chapter mainly deals with industrial
129  III,    10.  3.  2   | contaminants are only dealt with in Chapter 8.2.2 and not in the present
130  III,    10.  3.  2   |            2 and not in the present Chapter.~ ~
131  III,    10.  3.  2   |            2.2. Data sources~ ~This chapter is primarily based on extracts
132  III,    10.  3.  2   |              the Fourth assessment (chapter on chemicals), and the EEA /
133  III,    10.  3.  2   |         guidelinesSecond Edition Chapter 6.11 Platinum. WHO Europe.
134  III,    10.  3.  3   |             3.2. Data sources~ ~See Chapter 6.~ ~
135  III,    10.  3.  3   |            tools and policies~ ~See Chapter 6.~ ~ ~
136  III,    10.  3.  3   |           Future developments~ ~See Chapter 6.~ ~ ~
137  III,    10.  3.  3   |             3.3.6. References~ ~See Chapter 6.~ ~
138  III,    10.  3.  4   |           78.000 Million Euro. This chapter presents first of all an
139  III,    10.  3.  4   |           briefly mentioned in this chapter. With regard to heat, the
140  III,    10.  4.  1   |            2. Data Sources~ ~ ~This chapter is based on the European
141  III,    10.  4.  1   |             building blocks of this chapter, as well as several DG Research
142  III,    10.  4.  2   |         specified in its Annex III, Chapter A. At the beginning of 2005,
143  III,    10.  4.  2   |            Article 6.4 specified in Chapter B.I of Annex III of the
144  III,    10.  4.  2   |           pesticides. Particularly, Chapter V (articles 26 through 34)
145  III,    10.  4.  2   |       Section on “Biomonitoring” in Chapter 8.1.2. has pointed out how
146  III,    10.  4.  2   |           health loss in DALYs (see chapter 9.1).~ ~
147  III,    10.  4.  2   |            of both feed and food.~ ~Chapter II of the Regulation seeks
148  III,    10.  4.  4   |             piercing see Annex 1 of Chapter 5.13.~ ~The increasing production,
149  III,    10.  4.  4   |         from the manufacturing (see Chapter 8.1.2.) and use of consumer
150  III,    10.  4.  4   |       adequately enforced (see also Chapter 7). To facilitate this,
151  III,    10.  4.  4   |            PROSAFE) www g (see also Chapter 7).~ ~ ~
152  III,    10.  4.  5   |        especially relevant for this chapter is hazardous waste, EU waste
153  III,    10.  5.  1   |          sources~ ~The data in this chapter is mostly taken from scientific
154  III,    10.  5.  1   |         Legionella Pneumophila (see chapter 6).~ ~Construction materials
155  III,    10.  5.  1   |  Lebensmittelsicherheit, 2008) (see chapter 6 for fatal and non-fatal
156  III,    10.  5.  1   |             cities provided by this chapter is a very weak indication
157  III,    10.  5.  2   |          sources~ ~The data in this chapter is mostly taken from scientific
158  III,    10.  5.  2   |          the data presented in this chapter are based on sources which
159  III,    10.  5.  2   |          findings discussed in this chapter therefore strongly depend
160  III,    10.  5.  3   |            as health problems. This chapter therefore takes two perspectives.
161  III,    10.  5.  3   |            the world of work~ ~This chapter presents the impact of diseases
162  III,    10.  5.  3   |     morbidity and disability~ ~This chapter addresses the impact of
163  III,    10.  5.  3   |          risk environment”. In this chapter, the impact of work on disease
164  III,    10.  5.  3   |            fatal accidents see also Chapter 7.~ ~Table 10.5.3.5. Incidence
165  III,    10.  5.  3   |        tools and policies~ ~In this chapter it is pointed out that interventions
166  III,    10.  5.  3   |         activities. One aim of this chapter is to point out the common
167  III,    10.  6.  2   |    countries. The last part of this chapter illustrates some strategies
168  III,    10.  6.  3   |            homicides, are quoted in Chapter 7.~ ~ ~
169  III,    10.  6.  3   |             has been carried out in Chapter 7 (See figure 7.17).~ ~Contact
170   IV,    11.  1.  1   |           system.~ ~The aim of this chapter, therefore, is to familiarize
171   IV,    11.  1.  1   |           therefore important. This chapter thus provides an overview
172   IV,    11.  1.  1   |             Primarily a descriptive chapter, the discussion begins with
173   IV,    11.  1.  1   |           outside the scope of this chapter. The supply of resources
174   IV,    11.  1.  1   |          the outset that while this chapter adopts a European comparative
175   IV,    11.  1.  1   |        pursued, the purpose of this chapter is to provide a solid starting-point.~ ~
176   IV,    11.  1.  2   |            1.2. Data sources~ ~This chapter draws on a number of international
177   IV,    11.  1.  2   |       database where necessary, the chapter draws on the OECD health
178   IV,    11.  1.  2   |     international data sources, the chapter also makes use of European
179   IV,    11.  1.  2   |           health care. Finally, the chapter draws on published reports
180   IV,    11.  1.  3   |            as shown throughout this chapter, there are important differences
181   IV,    11.  1.  3   |      Although not the focus of this chapter, within this context of
182   IV,    11.  1.  3   |             again fall outside this chapter. Nevertheless, the increased
183   IV,    12.  2       |           in all policies (see also Chapter 11.5) and global health
184   IV,    12.  2       |            level. To this end, each chapter dealing with a specific