Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  1    |         population size and ageing, family structure, labour market
  2    I,     2.  3    |          less restrictive nature of family reunification policies and
  3    I,     2.  3    |            However, they (and their family dependants) may present
  4    I,     2.  5    |            force and changes in the family structure and lifestyle
  5    I,     3.  2    |          less restrictive nature of family reunification policies and
  6   II,     5.  1.  1|            are an high fat diet and family history, while possible
  7   II,     5.  1.  1|         type 2 diabetes runs in the family;~· Asian, Afro-Caribbean
  8   II,     5.  1.  1|           illness; substance abuse; family violence; and access to
  9   II,     5.  1.  1| Interpersonal factors: trouble with family and personal relationships,
 10   II,     5.  1.  1|             gender, smoking habits, family history of obstructive airway
 11   II,     5.  1.  1|              fruits of the Rosaceae family, vegetables of the Apiaceae
 12   II,     5.  1.  1|          vegetables of the Apiaceae family, nuts and peanuts, whereas
 13   II,     5.  1.  2|             the patient and his/her family have been educated as to
 14   II,     5.  1.  2|         many aspects of life, work, family life, leisure pursuits and
 15   II,     5.  1.  2|           of the interaction of the family, friends, and healthcare
 16   II,     5.  1.  3|    characteristicsi.e. personal, family, professional, social, economic,
 17   II,     5.  1.  3|         also involves the patient’s family and his/her closest friends.
 18   II,     5.  1.  4|             as patients.~ ~· In the family: information about how to
 19   II,     5.  3.  2|            often worried that their family history may put them at
 20   II,     5.  3.  4|          are a diet rich of fat and family history, while possible
 21   II,     5.  5.Int|          difficulty in personal and family relationships and can be
 22   II,     5.  5.Int|       factors. An individual with a family history of mood disorders
 23   II,     5.  5.Int|          level of support for their family and friends.~· Enabling
 24   II,     5.  5.  2|            carry on living in their family environments. Full-time
 25   II,     5.  5.  2|        living in their own homes or family environment in an autonomous
 26   II,     5.  5.  2|                As it is likely that family carers will continue to
 27   II,     5.  5.  3| Interpersonal factors: trouble with family and personal relationships,
 28   II,     5.  5.  3|          general population. In the family history of people with schizophrenia
 29   II,     5.  5.  3|       effects for psycho-education, family intervention and cognitive
 30   II,     5.  5.  3|  schizophrenia: I. Meta-analysis of family intervention and cognitive
 31   II,     5.  5.  3|           lost employment (36%) and family expenses (5%). These findings
 32   II,     5.  5.  3|             the patient and his/her family, on the emotional and social
 33   II,     5.  5.  3|        relation to their social and family environment, and in particular
 34   II,     5.  5.  3|           burden on the individual, family, health services and society,
 35   II,     5.  5.  3|             need for informal care (family and further caregivers)
 36   II,     5.  5.  3|     addition, due to the changes in family structure, the care of the
 37   II,     5.  5.  3|     Parkinson’s disease on society, family, and the individual. J Am
 38   II,     5.  6.  3|              premature menopause, a family history of fractures, smoking,
 39   II,     5.  8.  4|             gender, smoking habits, family history of obstructive airway
 40   II,     5.  9. FB|            children with a positive family history for atopy in first-degree
 41   II,     5. 10.  2|           foods of the Ombelliferae family), wheat and other cereals (
 42   II,     5. 10.  3|              fruits of the Rosaceae family, vegetables of the Apiaceae
 43   II,     5. 10.  3|          vegetables of the Apiaceae family, nuts and peanuts, whereas
 44   II,     5. 14.  3|              level of education and family income.~ ~The oral health
 45   II,     5. 15.  3|             mutation segregating in family members. These figures have
 46   II,     6.  3.  7|             to the same filoviridae family. Both are rare diseases,
 47   II,     7.  2.  1|        basis and belongs to the WHO family of classification systems
 48   II,     7.  3.  5|         illnesssubstance abusefamily violenceaccess to means
 49   II,     7.  4    |     injuries often affect the whole family, emotionally, organisationally
 50   II,     7.  4.  6|          factors or genetic traits (family history of suicide);~· life
 51   II,     7.  4.  6|            etc., connectedness with family and friends, high self-esteem,
 52   II,     7.  4.  7|      different environments (in the family, between intimate partners,
 53   II,     7.  4.  7|           working to create healthy family environments, as well as
 54   II,     8.  2.  1|      management by proxy, through a family carer or professional support
 55   II,     8.  2.  1|       testing for people who have a family member or other child with
 56   II,     8.  2.  1|           older, and for women with family histories of metabolic disorders.
 57   II,     8.  2.  1|       identified8.~Internationally, family care is the dominant form
 58   II,     8.  2.  1|       health and quality of life of family carers should be taken into
 59   II,     8.  2.  1|             whom they provide care. Family carers often act as the
 60   II,     8.  2.  1|         contacts on behalf of their family members when health care
 61   II,     8.  2.  2|             for the individual, the family and society. A major cause
 62   II,     8.  2.  2|             problem at personal and family level, as well as at community
 63   II,     9        |       influenced by their immediate family environment. Three factors
 64   II,     9        |           and appropriate heating), family income, and maternal education (
 65   II,     9        |       problems, infidelity or other family stressors, and creates tension
 66   II,     9.  1.  2|          and emotional costs to the familyprovision, quality and
 67   II,     9.  1.  2|      factors. Measures to alleviate family poverty should help to reduce
 68   II,     9.  1.  2|           outcome for the child and family in terms of survival, morbidity,
 69   II,     9.  2.  2|          children, such as the OECD Family Database. Topics covered
 70   II,     9.  2.  2|           and wellbeing and that of family and society. Yet this is
 71   II,     9.  2.  2|         such as school environment, family and peers can further reinforce
 72   II,     9.  2.  3|        about weight from friends or family, are thought to be an important
 73   II,     9.  2.  3|    behaviours and infrequent shared family meals; otherwise viewed
 74   II,     9.  2.  3|         girls who reported only 1-2 family meals per week engaged in
 75   II,     9.  2.  3|             who reported having 3-4 family meals/week (Neumark-Sztainer
 76   II,     9.  2.  3|             the traditional nuclear family, or pressures on modern
 77   II,     9.  2.  4|         determinants. These include family circumstances, parental
 78   II,     9.  2.  4|     parental education, housing and family income, advertising as well
 79   II,     9.  2.  4|       influenced by their immediate family environment. Three factors
 80   II,     9.  2.  4|           and appropriate heating), family income, and maternal education (
 81   II,     9.  2.  5|         child in the context of the family treated by a physician who
 82   II,     9.  2.  5|          target, notably related to family reunification, parental
 83   II,     9.  2.  7|            Children’s experience of family disruption and family formation:
 84   II,     9.  2.  7|            of family disruption and family formation: evidence from
 85   II,     9.  2.  7|          Life Course Perspective On Family Structures: Multi-State
 86   II,     9.  2.  7|           Fulkerson JA. (2004): Are family meal patterns associated
 87   II,     9.  3.  1|        difficulty in a personal and family relationships, and can be
 88   II,     9.  3.  1|       problems, infidelity or other family stressors, and creates tension
 89   II,     9.  3.  3|    including age, gender, religion, family, friends, culture, ethnicity,
 90   II,     9.  3.  3|          the Baltic area. Helsinki: Family federation of Finland.~Herlitz
 91   II,     9.  3.  3|          paper no.2. North Carolina:Family Health International (YouthNet
 92   II,     9.  3.  3|      Gesundheitliche Aufklärung~FHI~Family Health International~HBSC~
 93   II,     9.  4.  5|        partly due to the changes in family structures, older people
 94   II,     9.  4.  5|           health. Playing a part in family life and being a member
 95   II,     9.  4.  5|         older people care for other family members, especially their
 96   II,     9.  4.  5|          and assisting the informal family caregiver, who is most often
 97   II,     9.  4.  5|            a patient and his or her family. A communication issued
 98   II,     9.  4.  6|       affected but also for his/her family. For example, the financial
 99   II,     9.  5.  3|             occurs in every kind of family relationship and in every
100   II,     9.  5.  3|            one act of violence in a family may cost society 185 000
101   II,     9.  5.  3|       problems, infidelity or other family stressors, and creates tension
102   II,     9.  5.  3| contribution of alcohol to divorce, family break-up, child neglect
103   II,     9.  5.  3|        which way they will feed the family. Men attach less importance
104   II,     9.  5.  3|         Stiehr, 2004). In addition, family membersdisproportionately
105   II,     9.  5.  3|              2006).~ ~Workforce and Family Responsibilities~ ~The inactivity
106   II,     9.  5.  3|           labour force is therefore family responsibilities. Among
107   II,     9.  5.  3|          percentage inactive due to family responsibilities varied
108   II,     9.  5.  6|             EU27 is inactive due to family responsibilities. Eurostat
109  III,    10.  1.  1|              advertising), peer and family attitudes and influences,
110  III,    10.  1.  1|           fit and good-looking. The family environment and social norms
111  III,    10.  1.  1|              low self-esteem, and a family history of alcohol dependence.
112  III,    10.  1.  1|             factors mainly refer to family and peer influences. The
113  III,    10.  1.  1|            interpersonal conflicts, family disruption, failure to fulfil
114  III,    10.  1.  1|             2006; Milgram, 1993).~ ~Family structure and family life
115  III,    10.  1.  1|                Family structure and family life influence alcohol consumption.
116  III,    10.  1.  1|           plays an adaptive role in family life: marital satisfaction
117  III,    10.  1.  1|            be mediated by disturbed family relationships / family disharmony.
118  III,    10.  1.  1|    disturbed family relationships / family disharmony. The evidence
119  III,    10.  1.  1|           excessive drinking in the family environment and especially
120  III,    10.  1.  1|     environment and especially weak family bonds encourage frequent
121  III,    10.  1.  1|            relationships within the family or household strongly influence
122  III,    10.  1.  3|           SJ (1989): Alcoholism and family factors. A critical review.
123  III,    10.  1.  3|       parental alcohol problems and family disharmony in the genesis
124  III,    10.  1.  3|       parental alcohol problems and family disharmony in the genesis
125  III,    10.  1.  3|        intergenerational effects of family disharmony. Int J Addict
126  III,    10.  2.  1|           related injury, homicide, family violence, child abuse and
127  III,    10.  2.  1|            adult life with work and family). However, the EMCDDA is
128  III,    10.  2.  1|              Changes in lifestyles, family structure and demography,
129  III,    10.  2.  1|           1998). Many traditions of family life are changing as more
130  III,    10.  2.  1|        pharmacies (predictor test), family planning centres, work place
131  III,    10.  2.  1|     reproductive health. Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive
132  III,    10.  2.  4|   statistics, genomic research, the family history, individual genomic
133  III,    10.  2.  4|          health tasks by looking at family histories first, identify
134  III,    10.  2.  5|          capacity improved and that family satisfaction was higher
135  III,    10.  3.  1|            or atypical naevi, and a family history of skin cancer.
136  III,    10.  3.  4|       damage to the home or loss of family possessions and stress in
137  III,    10.  4.  2|           Glycoalkaloids~Nightshade family:~potato, tomato, thornapple~ ~
138  III,    10.  5.  2|            concerned social issues, family planning and preventive
139  III,    10.  5.  2|             case control study. BMC Family Practice 2005, 6:16.~[http://
140  III,    10.  5.  3|         balance the demands of both family and career and promoting
141  III,    10.  6.  1|         scales evaluates links with family members outside the household,
142  III,    10.  6.  1|            support from parents and family connectedness (Currie et
143  III,    10.  6.  1|      Künemund H, Lüdicke J. (2005): Family Structure, Proximity and
144  III,    10.  6.  3|      different environments (in the family, between intimate partners,
145  III,    10.  6.  3|           working to create healthy family environments, as well as
146   IV,    11.  1.  5|           care (American Academy of Family Physicians, 2006). Finally,
147   IV,    11.  1.  5|           most common mistake among family physicians (Dovey et al,
148   IV,    11.  1.  5|             error or who have had a family member in such a situation
149   IV,    11.  5.  4|           widely between countries.~Family refusals to donate organs
150   IV,    11.  5.  4|           organ donation within the family. There is an important positive
151   IV,    11.  5.  4|             discussed it within the family and willingness to donate
152   IV,    11.  6.  5|       taxonomy of medical errors in family practice." Quality and Safety
153   IV,    11.  6.  5|         errors commonly reported by family physicians." American Family
154   IV,    11.  6.  5|        family physicians." American Family Physician 67(4): 697.~ ~
155   IV,    12.  2    |           related injury, homicide, family violence, and child abuse
156   IV,    12. 10    | masterminded by Federal Ministry of Family, Seniors, Women and Adolescents (
157   IV,    12. 10    |              departments of Health; Family, Seniors, Women and Adolescents;
158   IV,    12. 10    |       prevention, sex education and family planning. It offers the
159   IV,    12. 10    |             about sex education and family planning for disseminators,~www e:
160   IV,    12. 10    |        Affairs, Federal Ministry of Family, Seniors, Women and Adolescents,
161   IV,    12. 10    |      interpersonal relations in the family, social and working environment
162   IV,    12. 10    |          reconciling the demands of family and professional life~8.
163   IV,    12. 10    |           friends, fellow students, family, companion) and other personal
164   IV,    12. 10    |            STI prevention campaign;~Family planning campaign and services~
165   IV,    12. 10    |             objective 2~ ~Financial family policy~Financial old age
166   IV,    13.  4    |            and reconciling work and family life;~· Ensuring the effective
167   IV,    13.  5    |           as the numbers of younger family members available to provide
168   IV,    13.  5    |          traditionally are the main family caregivers, increasingly
169   IV,    13.  6.  1|             children and with their family. Once the child reaches
170   IV,    13.  6.  1|        economic impact on the whole family. Siblings are also disadvantaged
171   IV,    13.  6.  1|      possibly by a reduced range of family activities and outings,
172   IV,    13.  6.  1|            by a reluctance of other family and friends to interact.~ ~
173   IV,    13.  6.  2|        there is a system of generic family general practitioners, with
174   IV,    13.  6.  2|  practitioners, with whom the whole family registers for primary care,
175   IV,    13.  6.  2|            and understanding of the family context. Other countries
176   IV,    13.  6.  2|            where the parent, or the family context, is perceived by