Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  3       |        participation, participation/ employment rates of immigrants and
  2    I,     2.  4       |              European Countries”. DG Employment and Social Affairs, 2004.
  3    I,     2.  5       |        sector) as well as changes in employment patterns (downsizing, outsourcing,
  4    I,     2.  5       |       pressing problems is that most employment relationships are informal
  5    I,     2.  5       |            In contrast to industrial employment, services went up as a share
  6    I,     2.  5       |              up as a share of global employment from 66 per cent in 1995
  7    I,     2.  5       |          EUROSTAT3 indicate that the employment rate in the third quarter
  8    I,     2.  5       |              European Commission, DG Employment and Social Affairs, released
  9    I,     2.  5       |            the European Commission’s Employment in Europe report, published
 10    I,     2.  5       |           men and women, the type of employment contracts and in career
 11    I,     2.  5       |        participation, participation/ employment rates of immigrants and
 12    I,     2.  5       |            to find and retain formal employment.~ ~Small and medium-sized
 13    I,     2.  5       |           fuller and more productive employment is more likely to offer
 14    I,     2. 10.  3   |              more real. 6 The direct employment effects of ICTs are, on
 15    I,     2. 10.  3(7)|             1995): Diffusion and the employment effects of information and
 16    I,     2. 11       |      Situation and Demography (EU DG Employment and Social Affairs). December
 17    I,     2. 11       |              at: http://ec.europa.eu/employment_social/social_situation/
 18    I,     2. 11       |     available at http://ec.europa.eu/employment_social/spsi/docs/social_
 19    I,     2. 11       |             1995): Diffusion and the employment effects of information and
 20   II,     4.  1       |              set the target that the employment rate for older workers should
 21   II,     4.  1       |            crucial in increasing the employment rate of older workers and
 22   II,     4.  1       |            in attracting people into employment (Commission of the European
 23   II,     4.  1       |             target of increasing the employment rate of the older workers.
 24   II,     4.  1       |         women, highlighting that the employment rate for older workers cannot
 25   II,     4.  1       |    sustainable economic growth, full employment and greater social cohesion
 26   II,     4.  1       |     possibilities for increasing the employment rate of the older workers.
 27   II,     4.  1       |          care (LTC) services than to employment rates.~ ~Longevity gaps
 28   II,     4.  1       |            support active ageing and employment in the context of lengthening
 29   II,     5.  2.  1   |           all-cause mortality) (2733 Employment, Social Policy, Health and
 30   II,     5.  2.  5   |           Finnish Presidency. (276th Employment, Social Policy, Health and
 31   II,     5.  2.  7   |              cardiology (2006): 2733 Employment, Social Policy, Health and
 32   II,     5.  4.  6   |            of type 2 diabetes at the Employment, Social Policy, Health and
 33   II,     5.  4.  8   |              type 2 diabetes, 2733rd Employment, Social Policy, Health and
 34   II,     5.  5.Int(9)|           www.ilo.org/public/english/employment/skills/disability/download/
 35   II,     5.  5.Int   |           where women undertake both employment and household/childbearing
 36   II,     5.  5.Int   |              mental problems in paid employment, though in most countries
 37   II,     5.  5.Int   |           the Community’s social and employment policy targeted the non-discrimination
 38   II,     5.  5.Int   |           disability in the field of employment; (ii) Actions under the
 39   II,     5.  5.  1   |              gender, marital status, employment status, education and rural/
 40   II,     5.  5.  1   |         gender, age, marital status, employment status, education, place
 41   II,     5.  5.  1   |           the Community’s social and employment policy have targeted the
 42   II,     5.  5.  3   |  relationships and from applying for employment, more than 70% resign from
 43   II,     5.  5.  3   |               59%), followed by lost employment (36%) and family expenses (
 44   II,     5.  5.  3   |             improved.~ ~Epilepsy and employment~People with epilepsy experience
 45   II,     5.  5.  3   |              and maintaining regular employment. Unemployment and underemployment
 46   II,     5.  5.  3   |              studies on epilepsy and employment have been performed in selected
 47   II,     5.  5.  3   |             differing definitions of employment problems. Social stigma
 48   II,     5.  5.  3   |          factors also tend to affect employment. These include fear and
 49   II,     5.  5.  3   |        long-term effects of specific employment programs are virtually unknown (
 50   II,     5.  5.  3   |          affect patientseducation, employment, driving and other daily
 51   II,     5.  5.  3   |           Anonymous, 2003). The ILAE Employment Commission recommends a
 52   II,     5.  5.  3   |            an individual assessment (Employment Committee of the IBE, 1989).
 53   II,     5.  5.  3   |              countries indicate that employment training programmes for
 54   II,     5.  5.  3   |             EU governments regarding employment and driving in patients
 55   II,     5.  5.  3   |                Living with epilepsy. Employment. Epilepsia 44 (suppl 6):
 56   II,     5.  5.  3   |             with other correlates of employment in epilepsy. Epilepsia 21:
 57   II,     5.  5.  3   |      epilepsy. Epilepsia 34:592-596.~Employment Committee of the International
 58   II,     5.  5.  3   |              al (2007): Epilepsy and employment: literature review. Epilepsy
 59   II,     5.  5.  3   |       redress.~A new study on MS and employment in the EU is in its final
 60   II,     5.  5.  3   |             on MS patients and their employment situation focused on identifying
 61   II,     5.  5.  3   |             directly associated with employment status, but accounted for
 62   II,     5.  5.  3   |  comprehensive data available on the employment situation of people with
 63   II,     5.  5.  3   |              determining the general employment situation in a sample of
 64   II,     5.  5.  3   |              people actively seeking employment, number of currently employed
 65   II,     5.  5.  3   |           choice/ability to maintain employment. The outcomes of the study
 66   II,     5.  5.  3   |            MS to obtain and maintain employment, without discrimination,
 67   II,     5.  5.  3   |            European Union level, the employment of people with MS to help
 68   II,     5.  5.  3   |   application of the EU directive on employment of the disabled throughout
 69   II,     5.  5.  3   |              and in particular their employment prospects.~Paragraph 1 of
 70   II,     5.  5.  3   |              and services, research, employment, and empowerment of people
 71   II,     5.  5.  3   |             agenda in MS research;~· Employment and Job retentionParticipation
 72   II,     5.  5.  3   |            Schulenburg, 2007).~ ~PD, employment and indirect costs~Only
 73   II,     5.  5.  3   |              of PD on retirement and employment in the former German Democratic
 74   II,     5.  5.  3   |           years, no major changes in employment trends have been observed
 75   II,     5.  9.  5   |         settingshouses, places of employment, schools and cities - should
 76   II,     5. 14.  3   |          profession has an impact on employment in advanced health care.
 77   II,     7.  1       |       independent sectorstraffic, employment, consumer safety, housing,
 78   II,     7.  5       |          domains, such as transport, employment, justice, housing, consumer
 79   II,     7.  5       |         Commission, (e.g. Transport, Employment, Justice, Civil Protection
 80   II,     8.  1.  3   |          considerable limitations.~ ~Employment rates~ ~The age-standardized
 81   II,     8.  1.  3   |         rates~ ~The age-standardized employment rates of people in the age
 82   II,     8.  1.  5   |         broad range of areas such as employment, accessibility, education,
 83   II,     8.  1.  5   |             are necessary to promote employment of people with disabilities
 84   II,     9.  2.  2   |       married householders with paid employment being put in the same category
 85   II,     9.  2.  2   |         involved in illegal underage employment (WHO/HSBC 2004). These groups
 86   II,     9.  2.  6   |             and poverty alleviation, employment, and education are just
 87   II,     9.  3.  1   |              health problems in paid employment, though in most countries
 88   II,     9.  3.  1   |           where women undertake both employment and household/childrearing
 89   II,     9.  3.  1   | psychological ill health, stressors, employment, personality factors and
 90   II,     9.  3.  3   |            in poverty, education and employment. Demographic changes have
 91   II,     9.  4.  5   |           replies point to the large employment challenges and opportunities
 92   II,     9.  4.  5   |            opportunities to increase employment. The health and social services
 93   II,     9.  4.  5   |      employer with 9.7% of the total employment in the European Union in
 94   II,     9.  5.  1   |             with children have lower employment rates than those without.
 95   II,     9.  5.  3   |             with children have lower employment rates than those without (
 96   II,     9.  5.  3   |             have lower education and employment levels than women who quit
 97   II,     9.  5.  3   |              can reduce learning and employment potential (Hammarström and
 98   II,     9.  5.  4   |              Community programme for employment and social solidarity PROGRESS.~
 99   II,     9.  5.  4   |              and women in matters of employment and occupation.~ Reference
100   II,     9.  5.  4   |          A6-0119/2005 : 09/08/2006Employment policies of the Member States.~
101  III,    10.  2.  1   |           would otherwise be in paid employment (informal care).~ ~The current
102  III,    10.  2.  1   |             be taken into account as employment rates and housing conditions
103  III,    10.  3.  4   |            quality, energy security, employment and soil fertility.~ ~Extreme
104  III,    10.  5.  3   |       aspects of EU policy-making on employment and social affairs and is
105  III,    10.  5.  3   |        work-related information like employment status, occupations or economic
106  III,    10.  5.  3   |         productivity during years of employment and to pre-mature retirement.
107  III,    10.  5.  3   |              100 thousand persons in employment from 1994 to 2004~ ~Table
108  III,    10.  5.  3   |              which were women.~· The employment rate, which measures the
109  III,    10.  5.  3   |        target for 2010.~· The female employment rate reached 56.3% in the
110  III,    10.  5.  3   |              female participation in employment since 1997.~· In Denmark,
111  III,    10.  5.  3   |             below 50% in 2005.~· The employment rate of older people (55
112  III,    10.  5.  3   |        sector) as well as changes in employment patterns (downsizing, outsourcing,
113  III,    10.  5.  3   |       pressing problems is that most employment relationships are informal
114  III,    10.  5.  3   |      international level.~The direct employment effects of ICTs are, on
115  III,    10.  5.  3   |            In contrast to industrial employment, services went up as a share
116  III,    10.  5.  3   |              up as a share of global employment from 66 per cent in 1995
117  III,    10.  5.  3   |           men and women, the type of employment contracts and career development
118  III,    10.  5.  3   |            to find and retain formal employment.~ ~Small and medium-sized
119  III,    10.  5.  3   |    productivity, competitiveness and employment. However, there are still
120  III,    10.  5.  3   |          social inequalities such as employment status, income, gender and
121  III,    10.  5.  3   |           nature (different forms of employment such as temporary work,
122  III,    10.  5.  3   |             health issues as part of employment strategies aimed at ensuring
123  III,    10.  5.  3   |         health: the role of work and employment. In Siegrist J & M. Marmot (
124  III,    10.  6.  2   |              European Countries”. DG Employment and Social Affairs, 2004;~·
125  III,    10.  6.  2   |              European Countries”. DG Employment and Social Affairs, 2004.
126  III,    10.  6.  2   |             including:~ ~· Economic, employment and social policy - through
127  III,    10.  6.  2   |            barrier method to provide employment for vulnerable groups. All
128   IV,    11.  5.  4   |             States, the training and employment of healthcare professionals
129   IV,    11.  6.  2   |           away from tax financing to employment related insurance contributions.
130   IV,    11.  6.  2   |         informal economies, and self employment, in addition to concerns
131   IV,    11.  6.  2   |            contributions directly to employment income. For instance, since
132   IV,    11.  6.  2   |            is dependent on income or employment, there may be limited access
133   IV,    11.  6.  2   |          less vulnerable to wage and employment fluctuations (though the
134   IV,    11.  6.  4   |         deficits.~30 sickness funds (employment based)~No capitation. Allocation
135   IV,    11.  6.  4   |              Funds~9 sickness funds (employment based)~No capitation. Full
136   IV,    11.  6.  4   |            based)~Age, living alone, employment status, housing tenure,
137   IV,    11.  6.  5   |               European Commission DG Employment and Social Affairs.~ ~Thomson
138   IV,    12.  1       |          frontiers. This has created employment and prosperity, expanded
139   IV,    12.  1       |           Potential impact~on health~Employment and social affairs~ ~Social
140   IV,    12.  1       |              health service obtained~Employment and social affairs~ ~Labour
141   IV,    12.  1       |               Promoting cross border employment, creating the potential
142   IV,    12.  2       |           Finnish Presidency. (276th Employment, Social Policy, Health and
143   IV,    12.  4       |       Programme (2007/2013), with DG Employment on health insurance and
144   IV,    12. 10       |   Erkrankungen); Federal Ministry of Employment and Social Affairs promotes
145   IV,    12. 10       |           concerning their access to employment, to vocational training
146   IV,    12. 10       |             Work (of the Ministry of Employment and Social Protection)~o
147   IV,    12. 10       |              o The Greek Ministry of Employment and Social Protection is
148   IV,    12. 10       |                The Greek Ministry of Employment and Social Security (www r)
149   IV,    12. 10       |              pillars of the European Employment Strategy, while the ninth
150   IV,    12. 10       |          policy~Labour market status~Employment rate~ ~Unemployment rate~ ~
151   IV,    12. 10       |         Proportion registered at the employment agency~ ~Proportion of long-term
152   IV,    12. 10       |       job-seekers (registered at the employment agency~ ~Incapacity rate~
153   IV,    12. 10       |           Equal opportunity policy~ ~Employment security~Threat of redundancy/
154   IV,    13.  4       |           European Union as a whole. Employment and social policy have an
155   IV,    13.  4       |     migration. In the context of the Employment Strategy, the Commission
156   IV,    13.  4       |         Programmes with Annual Joint Employment Reports and encourages Member
157   IV,    13.  4       |          explicit dimension of their employment policies.~ ~The 2007 National
158   IV,    13.  4       |            form of discrimination in employment and occupation:~· Directive
159   IV,    13.  4       |     framework for equal treatment in employment and occupation.~Since 2001,
160   IV,    13.  4       |        priority "Enhancing access to employment" (ESF regulation art. 3.
161   IV,    13.  4       |         participation of migrants in employment and strengthen their social
162   IV,    13.  4       |             to integrate people into employment, specific actions to validate
163   IV,    13.  4       |           migrants' participation in employment. Equally important is the
164   IV,    13.  4       |             PROGRESS is the EU’s new employment and social solidarity programme
165   IV,    13.  4       |       implementation of the European Employment Strategy and the open method
166   IV,    13.  5       |           record in terms of regular employment, higher income levels and,
167   IV,    13.  6.  1   |      children may obtain lower level employment and also have greater and
168   IV,    13.  6.  1   |             result in a reduction in employment availability, and thus in
169   IV,    13.  7.  2   |          higher levels of growth and employment. Given the areas identified,
170   IV,    13.  7.  2   |             US. The EU also leads in employment in manufacturing industries
171   IV,    13.  7.  3   |              the competitiveness and employment needs of the EU, with a
172  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0   |        emissions~emotional~emphysema~employment~empowerment~encephalitis~