Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1   II,     4.  1    |             figures indicate that the sex difference in life duration
  2   II,     5.  1.  1|           modify endogenous levels of sex hormones (Key et al, 2002).
  3   II,     5.  2.  5|             assessment, based on age, sex, smoking habit, systolic
  4   II,     5.  2.  6|            vascular mortality by age, sex, and blood pressure: a meta-analysis
  5   II,     5.  3.  3|          mortality statistics by age, sex, and cause of death as obtained
  6   II,     5.  3.  4|           modify endogenous levels of sex hormones (Key et al, 2002).
  7   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.
  8   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure
  9   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.2b. Trends
 10   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex B) Women~ ~ ~Figure 5.3.
 11   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.
 12   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure
 13   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.4b. Trends
 14   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex B) Women~ ~Stomach Cancer (
 15   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.
 16   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure
 17   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.6b. Trends
 18   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.7a.
 19   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.
 20   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure
 21   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.8b. Trends
 22   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex B) Women~ ~Colorectal Cancer (
 23   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.
 24   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure
 25   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.10b. Trends
 26   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.11a.
 27   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.
 28   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure
 29   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.12b. Trends
 30   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex B) Women~ ~ ~Lung Cancer (
 31   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.
 32   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure
 33   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.14b. Trends
 34   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex B) Women~ ~Figure 5.3.15a.
 35   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 A) Men~Figure 5.
 36   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex in 2006 B) Women~ ~Figure
 37   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex A) Men~Figure 5.3.16b. Trends
 38   II,     5.  3.  5|          rates (European standard) by sex B) Women~ ~Female Breast
 39   II,     5.  3.  6|             year relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between
 40   II,     5.  3.  6|             year relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between
 41   II,     5.  3.  6|             year relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between
 42   II,     5.  3.  6|             year relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between
 43   II,     5.  3.  6|             year relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between
 44   II,     5.  3.  6|             year relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between
 45   II,     5.  3.  6|             year relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between
 46   II,     5.  3.  6|             year relative survival by sex. Patients diagnosed between
 47   II,     5.  3.  9|              Group (2002): Endogenous sex hormones and breast cancer
 48   II,     5.  4.  2|         services.~Information on age, sex and linked medication, doctor’
 49   II,     5.  5.  3|      incidence and prevalence by age, sex, disease course and disability,
 50   II,     5.  6.  3|       interactions between the female sex hormones and RA. The onset
 51   II,     5.  7.  3|            countries.~ ~Figure 5.7.4. Sex and age specific prevalence
 52   II,     5.  7.  3|             kidney disease by age and sex.~ ~In 2005 the crude prevalence
 53   II,     5.  9.  4|            confirm this change in the sex ratio, a Scottish study
 54   II,     5.  9.  4|               99, 1.45). By 2004 this sex bias in diagnosis was no
 55   II,     5.  9.  4|             significant difference in sex distribution changes between
 56   II,     5.  9.  4|              for the narrowing of the sex ratio, but other factors
 57   II,     5.  9.  4|           Parietaria judaica. The agesex standardized prevalence
 58   II,     5.  9.  4|        Highest, median and lowest agesex standardized prevalence
 59   II,     5.  9.  4| physician-diagnosed asthma and female sex (odds ratio, OR = 0.5);
 60   II,     5.  9.  7|             2007): Changing trends in sex specific prevalence rates
 61   II,     5. 10.  2|        Notably, little information on sex and gender differences has
 62   II,     5. 12.  3|          between -5 and -1.5% in both sex in the last decade only).
 63   II,     6.  3.  3|             diagnoses in men who have sex with men declined until
 64   II,     6.  3.  3|             diagnoses in men who have sex with men and people infected
 65   II,     6.  3.  3|           across Europe, men who have sex with men is the largest
 66   II,     6.  3.  3|               is needed; men who have sex with men, where new methods
 67   II,     6.  3.  3|             cities among men who have sex with men.~ ~ ~Gonorrhoea~ ~
 68   II,     6.  3.  3|         cities involving men who have sex with men. In the Baltic
 69   II,     6.  3.  3|              and people with multiple sex partners.~ ~Almost 180 000
 70   II,     6.  3.  5|            highest rates. The age and sex distribution varied across
 71   II,     6.  3.  5|               the vaccine coverage by sex (some vaccination programmes
 72   II,     6.  3.  6|         contacts between men who have sex with men.~The incidence
 73   II,     6.  3.  6|       transmission among men who have sex with men has been described.
 74   II,     7.  2.  2|            also available by country, sex and selected ICD codes at
 75   II,     7.  3.  2|          Injury deaths per 100 000 by sex and age group, EU27~ ~Recent
 76   II,     7.  3.  5|               and suicide attempts by sex, selected EUGLOREH countries~ ~
 77   II,     7.  3.  5|              distributed evenly among sex or age groups. More men
 78   II,     7.  3.  5|              17. Homicide, assault by sex selected EUGLOREH countries).~ ~
 79   II,     7.  3.  5|              17. Homicide, assault by sex selected EUGLOREH countries~ ~
 80   II,     7.  4    |             injury risks according to sex, age and social status.~ ~
 81   II,     9        |             mental well-being. Unsafe sex can have implications for
 82   II,     9        |             STIs can include multiple sex partners and a weakened
 83   II,     9.  2.  3|             or raped, or enticed into sex by someone older, more powerful,
 84   II,     9.  2.  4|             mental well-being. Unsafe sex can have implications for
 85   II,     9.  2.  4|             STIs can include multiple sex partners and a weakened
 86   II,     9.  2.  5|             paedophilia, trafficking, sex tourism and forced labour.
 87   II,     9.  3.  1|             2001) as follows:~ ~· the sex chromosomes;~· immune response;~·
 88   II,     9.  3.  1|              presented broken down by sex, there is rarely comment
 89   II,     9.  3.  1|             boys engage in consensual sex, girls are more likely than
 90   II,     9.  3.  1|             or raped, or enticed into sex by someone older, stronger
 91   II,     9.  3.  1|             Many studies suggest that sex hormones influence brain
 92   II,     9.  3.  1|          concentration due to altered Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (
 93   II,     9.  3.  1|     infections in the European Union. Sex. Transm. Inf. 80;255-263;
 94   II,     9.  3.  1|   contributions to human health: does sex matter? Washington, D.C.:
 95   II,     9.  3.  1|        Deficiency of Aging Males~SHBG~Sex Hormone Binding Globulin~
 96   II,     9.  3.  3|          pursue a fulfilling and safe sex life is central to achievements
 97   II,     9.  3.  3|              The WHO estimates unsafe sex to be the second most important
 98   II,     9.  3.  3|         behaviours such as occasional sex with multiple partners without
 99   II,     9.  3.  3|              M et al, 1998).~· Global sex survey (Wellings et al,
100   II,     9.  3.  3|               detailed information on sex education and advice, sexual
101   II,     9.  3.  3|         Number of partners and casual sex~ ~Partnering patterns have
102   II,     9.  3.  3|                men also report casual sex contacts more often than
103   II,     9.  3.  3|               experiencing occasional sex reported that they did not
104   II,     9.  3.  3|             partners than the Finnish sex study made in 1999 (Nikula
105   II,     9.  3.  3|              the prevalence of casual sex among women than among men.~ ~
106   II,     9.  3.  3|              period of increased safe sex practice, sexual behaviour
107   II,     9.  3.  3|           consumption prior to having sex. Numerous studies have reported
108   II,     9.  3.  3|           most men who currently have sex with men (MSM) have similar
109   II,     9.  3.  3|            association between school sex education and risk reduction
110   II,     9.  3.  3|           source of information about sex) are those which are amenable
111   II,     9.  3.  3|           have healthy and satisfying sex lives (European Parliament,
112   II,     9.  3.  3|              is that curriculum-based sex education does not increase
113   II,     9.  3.  3|               have shown school-based sex education to lead to improved
114   II,     9.  3.  3|              intention to adopt safer sex behaviours, and to delay
115   II,     9.  3.  3|        experienced coercive or forced sex;~· percentage of adolescents
116   II,     9.  3.  3|           intercourse, subdivided per sex;~· percentage of sexually
117   II,     9.  3.  3|           intercourse, subdivided per sex;~· percentage of sexually
118   II,     9.  3.  3|               condoms, subdivided per sex;~· age at marriage (for
119   II,     9.  3.  3|             percentage of men who had sex with a commercial sex worker
120   II,     9.  3.  3|             had sex with a commercial sex worker in the last year;~·
121   II,     9.  3.  3|              women aged 15-19 who had sex with a man to whom they
122   II,     9.  3.  3|              European Union. However, sex is a private activity between
123   II,     9.  3.  3|          linked to outcomes of unsafe sex rather than sexual behaviour
124   II,     9.  3.  3|          Adolescentsexperience with sex on the web: results from
125   II,     9.  3.  3|        challenges in survey research. Sex Transm Infect 77: 84-92.~
126   II,     9.  3.  3|              Sweden (1989-2003). Arch Sex Behav 34:219-29.~Hessling
127   II,     9.  3.  3|           Rolleri L (2006): Impact of sex and HIVeducation programs
128   II,     9.  3.  3|              ie]~McIntyre JA. (2005): Sex, pregnancy, hormones, and
129   II,     9.  3.  3|          Relationships~MSM~Men having sex with men~NEM~New Encounter
130   II,     9.  4.  3|              status often resulted in sex with casual partners and
131   II,     9.  4.  3|            the other hand, protective sex was performed by only a
132   II,     9.  4.  3|              are not included in safe sex messages. They are assumed
133   II,     9.  5.  1|              a woman. In contrast to “sex” which refers to biological
134   II,     9.  5.  3|          Doyal, 1998).~ ~Table 9.5.1. Sex differences in the prevalence
135   II,     9.  5.  3|              in England and Wales, by sex and age, April 2001~ ~Vi ~ ~
136   II,     9.  5.  3|          towards men, and within same sex relationships. One in 4
137   II,     9.  5.  3|              food choice, divided per sex and age, 1996 (%)~ ~Women’
138   II,     9.  5.  4|     comparable data disaggregated per sex (European Commission, 2006).~ ~
139   II,     9.  5.  6|        throughout life in relation to sex hormones and prolactin concentrations
140   II,     9.  5.  6|    femininities in secondary schools. Sex Education, 3(1), pp. 47-
141  III,    10.  1.  1|           consumption prior to having sex.~Numerous studies have reported
142  III,    10.  2.  1|              between 2000 and 2002.~ ~Sex, age and socio-economic
143  III,    10.  2.  1|             in 2001/2002 according to sex (Male/Female) was similar
144  III,    10.  2.  4|                in addition to age and sex standardisation of diseases);~·
145  III,    10.  6.  1|              the relationship between sex and psychological distress.
146  III,    10.  6.  2|               income. Apart from age, sex and constitutional characteristics,
147  III,    10.  6.  3|              distributed evenly among sex or age groups. More men
148   IV,    11.  1.  5|            all patients regardless of sex, age and level of co-morbidities
149   IV,    11.  6.  4|           crude weightings of age and sex. More sophisticated formulae
150   IV,    11.  6.  4|       competitive sickness funds~Age, sex, unemployment, disability,
151   IV,    11.  6.  4|       competitive sickness funds~Age, sex (and fund’s income base)~
152   IV,    11.  6.  4|             regional governments~Age, sex, mortality (one third based
153   IV,    11.  6.  4|       competitive sickness funds~Age, sex, welfare or disability status,
154   IV,    11.  6.  4|           regional health boards~Age, sex, mortality (and rural costs)~
155   IV,    11.  6.  4|            Each fund allocates~ ~Age, sex~Slovenia~National Health
156   IV,    11.  6.  4|       Competitive sickness funds~Age, sex, region (and fund’s income
157   IV,    11.  6.  4|            geographically based)~Age, sex, mortality (cost adjustment
158   IV,    12. 10    |             to prevent HIV/AIDS, save sex, etc. provided by the Danish
159   IV,    12. 10    |          targets are AIDS prevention, sex education and family planning.
160   IV,    12. 10    |            provides information about sex education and family planning
161   IV,    12. 10    |              the relevance of putting sex and gender issues into health
162   IV,    12. 10    |           agenda. Besides focusing on sex differences and specificities,
163   IV,    12. 10    |                 Project about Health, Sex and Gender) intend to attend
164   IV,    12. 10    |         published the reportHealth, Sex and Gender: Facts, Representations
165   IV,    12. 10    |          Education policy~Unprotected sex~ ~Number of births and abortions/
166   IV,    12. 10    |          during the last month~B: had sex without a condom "on the
167   IV,    13.  2.  4|              illicit drugs and unsafe sex would lessen the burden
168   IV,    13.  4    |             to ensure the ban on age, sex, ethnicity or other form
169   IV,    13.  5    |             and women. Because of the sex differential in longevity,
170  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|         self-management~sensitization~sex~sexual~sexually transmitted~