Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  1    |         their major impact on health outcomes, have become more and more
  2    I,     2.  1    |       largely contribute to economic outcomes in high-income countries
  3    I,     2.  4    |            at successful educational outcomes for each child, is necessary
  4    I,     2.  8    |             WHO (2004)~ ~Many health outcomes depend on the technology
  5    I,     2. 10.  1|            risk stratification shows outcomes which lead to the description
  6   II,     5.  2.  6|              evaluating progress and outcomes.~ ~Plasma cholesterol levels
  7   II,     5.  3.  1|              indications that cancer outcomes are related to macro-social
  8   II,     5.  3.  2|           factors on cancer risk and outcomes, and supporting investigations
  9   II,     5.  3.  2|         about treatment patterns and outcomes, access to treatment between
 10   II,     5.  3.  6|            generally had good cancer outcomes, but those with conspicuously
 11   II,     5.  3.  6|             with conspicuously worse outcomes than those with similar
 12   II,     5.  3.  6|           the differences noticed in outcomes.~ ~
 13   II,     5.  3.  7|          services and improve cancer outcomes with clinical services is
 14   II,     5.  4.Acr|         Information Through Regional Outcomes~DDD~Defined Daily Dose~DRG~
 15   II,     5.  4.Acr|         Information Through Regional Outcomes in Diabetes~EUCID~European
 16   II,     5.  4.  1|        quality of life and patients' outcomes on an everyday basis. The
 17   II,     5.  4.  2|              of care, and population outcomes.~In the year 1989, increasing
 18   II,     5.  4.  2|        measurements, procedures, and outcomes are accurately recorded.~
 19   II,     5.  4.  2|             likely to experience bad outcomes.~ ~
 20   II,     5.  4.  2|             a range of processes and outcomes indicators.~The OECD basic
 21   II,     5.  4.  2|            Audit and the Quality and Outcomes Framework.~ ~Table 5.4.2.
 22   II,     5.  4.  2|             Annual eye exam~Proximal outcomes~ ~HbA1c control ~LDL-C control~
 23   II,     5.  4.  2|        control ~LDL-C control~Distal outcomes~Lower extremity amputation
 24   II,     5.  4.  2|        information on procedures and outcomes experienced by patients
 25   II,     5.  4.  2|      management causing intermediate outcomes that can lead to severe
 26   II,     5.  4.  4|       possible scenarios.~Among core outcomes, blindness is one of the
 27   II,     5.  4.  4|            as those above.~Secondary outcomes, including renal failure,
 28   II,     5.  4.  6|              targets to track health outcomes and cost-effectiveness,
 29   II,     5.  4.  7|       strategic approachmeasuring outcomes continuously and not just
 30   II,     5.  4.  7|         Information through Regional Outcomes” (BIRO) project is worth
 31   II,     5.  4.  7|         Information through Regional Outcomes in Diabetes” (EUBIROD),
 32   II,     5.  4.  7|            intermediate and terminal outcomes).~While, the question about
 33   II,     5.  5.  3|             abuse and eating-related outcomes for men and women separately
 34   II,     5.  5.  3|             N.; Bulik, C. M. (2007): Outcomes of Eating Disorders: A Systematic
 35   II,     5.  5.  3|            the Schizophrenia Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT) Client
 36   II,     5.  5.  3|             Lessons from the Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT) Project.
 37   II,     5.  5.  3|              Priebe S (2007): Social outcomes in schizophrenia. British
 38   II,     5.  5.  3|             maintain employment. The outcomes of the study will be published
 39   II,     5.  6.  3|           studies (Brooks, 1997) but outcomes have improved over recent
 40   II,     5.  6.  6|              LJ, III (2003): Adverse outcomes of osteoporotic fractures
 41   II,     5.  7.Acr|             Disease Improving Global Outcomes~MDRD~Modification of Diet
 42   II,     5.  7.Acr|           Population~QOF~Quality and Outcomes Framework~RRT~Renal Replacement
 43   II,     5.  7.  1|          aimed at improving clinical outcomes. Proteinuria and microalbuminuria (
 44   II,     5.  7.  1|       amplifies the risk for adverse outcomes and the resulting costs
 45   II,     5.  7.  1|             Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) initiative (Tables
 46   II,     5.  7.  3|            the reasons for different outcomes in haemodialysis patients
 47   II,     5.  7.  5|             will be based on patient outcomes, referral patterns and hospital
 48   II,     5.  7.  5|             CKD into the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), which rewards
 49   II,     5.  9.  1|              result in poorer asthma outcomes. As a result, asthma-related
 50   II,     5. 11.  3|            could be a part of future outcomes.~ ~In addition. gaining
 51   II,     5. 14.  2|         dental fillings, but not the outcomes, i.e. whether interventions
 52   II,     5. 14.  2|        assure quality and favourable outcomes, and extend more affordable
 53   II,     5. 14.  5|           health delivery models and outcomes, and oral health related
 54   II,     7.  3.  1|           comparison of major injury outcomes per injury sector, providing
 55   II,     7.  4    |        measurability of intermediate outcomes of actions and impacts in
 56   II,     8.  2.  1|              characteristics, health outcomes and use of health services
 57   II,     8.  2.  1|            thus compare their health outcomes and service utilization
 58   II,     8.  2.  1|         sustained benefits in health outcomes following a clinical health
 59   II,     8.  2.  1|           physical and mental health outcomes and typically have limited
 60   II,     8.  2.  1|        recommended to improve health outcomes for people with intellectual
 61   II,     8.  2.  1|           and also to compare health outcomes, determinants and systems
 62   II,     8.  2.  1|           intellectual disabilities: outcomes of a health screening programme
 63   II,     8.  2.  2|                2005): Prevalence and outcomes of childhood visual disorders.
 64   II,     9        |             age and perinatal health outcomes is U-shaped and it is thus
 65   II,     9        |             The risk of many adverse outcomes begins to increase at approximately
 66   II,     9        |              of smoking on perinatal outcomes, in particular their birthweight
 67   II,     9        |            Finally, perinatal health outcomes are linked to social factors (
 68   II,     9        |              of smoking on perinatal outcomes, however, because many women
 69   II,     9        |             with poorer reproductive outcomes.~ ~Our knowledge of the
 70   II,     9.  1.  1|          evaluating perinatal health outcomes. Very preterm babies have
 71   II,     9.  1.  1|         factors associated with poor outcomes. For a synthesis of available
 72   II,     9.  1.  1|               2003): Maternal health outcomes in Europe. Eur J Obstet
 73   II,     9.  1.  1|          2002): Parity and pregnancy outcomes. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2002;
 74   II,     9.  1.  1|       characteristics, and pregnancy outcomes. Nicotine Tob Res 2004;6
 75   II,     9.  1.  1|         Greene JD (2006): Short-term outcomes of infants born at 35 and
 76   II,     9.  1.  1|        Croughan MS (2004): Perinatal outcomes in singletons following
 77   II,     9.  1.  1|            complications and adverse outcomes with increasing maternal
 78   II,     9.  1.  1|       maternal morbidity and adverse outcomes with increasing maternal
 79   II,     9.  1.  1|       Determinants of poor pregnancy outcomes among teenagers in Sweden.
 80   II,     9.  1.  2|             age and perinatal health outcomes is U-shaped and it is thus
 81   II,     9.  1.  2|             The risk of many adverse outcomes begins to increase at approximately
 82   II,     9.  1.  2|              of smoking on perinatal outcomes, in particular their birthweight
 83   II,     9.  1.  2|            Finally, perinatal health outcomes are linked to social factors (
 84   II,     9.  1.  2|              of smoking on perinatal outcomes, however, because many women
 85   II,     9.  1.  2|             with poorer reproductive outcomes.~ ~Our knowledge of the
 86   II,     9.  1.  2|        information on improvement of outcomes over time tends to come
 87   II,     9.  1.  2|      anomalies as part of a range of outcomes including birth weight and
 88   II,     9.  1.  2|              and neuro-developmental outcomes. However, for congenital
 89   II,     9.  2.  3|           physical and psychological outcomes. Those who diet are more
 90   II,     9.  3.  1|      contribute to poorer short-term outcomes after coronary events or
 91   II,     9.  3.  2|         factors associated with poor outcomes. For a synthesis of available
 92   II,     9.  3.  2|              poorer perinatal health outcomes for migrant women. Of these
 93   II,     9.  3.  2|          these may have an effect on outcomes (Alran et al, 2002; Langer
 94   II,     9.  3.  2|         large improvements in health outcomes for mothers and their babies.
 95   II,     9.  3.  2|               2003): Maternal health outcomes in Europe. Eur J Obstet
 96   II,     9.  3.  2|          2002): Parity and pregnancy outcomes. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2002;
 97   II,     9.  3.  2|       characteristics, and pregnancy outcomes. Nicotine Tob Res 2004;6
 98   II,     9.  3.  2|         Greene JD (2006): Short-term outcomes of infants born at 35 and
 99   II,     9.  3.  2|        Croughan MS (2004): Perinatal outcomes in singletons following
100   II,     9.  3.  2|            complications and adverse outcomes with increasing maternal
101   II,     9.  3.  2|       maternal morbidity and adverse outcomes with increasing maternal
102   II,     9.  3.  2|           2007): Neonatal and 5-year outcomes after birth at 30-34 weeks
103   II,     9.  3.  2|       Determinants of poor pregnancy outcomes among teenagers in Sweden.
104   II,     9.  3.  3|          sexual behaviour and health outcomes in comparison to age or
105   II,     9.  3.  3|         behaviour and adverse health outcomes for both genders.~ ~Results
106   II,     9.  3.  3|            against a host of adverse outcomes. There needs to be reassurance
107   II,     9.  3.  3|            against a host of adverse outcomes and let people have a responsible,
108   II,     9.  3.  3|              and reproductive health outcomes for monitoring trends and
109   II,     9.  3.  3|    indicators are directly linked to outcomes of unsafe sex rather than
110   II,     9.  4.  3|              can affect after stroke outcomes. It is likely that elderly
111   II,     9.  4.  3|             still showing benefit in outcomes more than 20 years later (
112   II,     9.  4.  5|      barriers in access, quality and outcomes of care that different vulnerable
113   II,     9.  5.  2|        gender inequalities in health outcomes.~ ~
114   II,     9.  5.  3|              to treatments and their outcomes. Female gender is a significant
115  III,    10.  1.  1|              health determinants and outcomes may be causal or non-causal,
116  III,    10.  1.  3|         Group on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research. Circulation 114:
117  III,    10.  2.  1|        timely manner, achieve better outcomes than those not receiving
118  III,    10.  2.  1|           users, long-term treatment outcomes and other subjects could
119  III,    10.  2.  4|            risk stratification shows outcomes which lead to the description
120  III,    10.  2.  4|       disease syndromes” and “health outcomes”;~· the potential of individual
121  III,    10.  3.  4|            to prevent adverse health outcomes .~ ~With regard to flooding,
122  III,    10.  4.  1|       secondary particles).~The main outcomes of the CAFE Programme were
123  III,    10.  4.  3|         review is based on the first outcomes of the Environment and Health
124  III,    10.  4.  5|           mortality and reproductive outcomes such as birth defects and
125  III,    10.  4.  5|            stronger for reproductive outcomes than cancer, is, however,
126  III,    10.  5.  2|          associated to better health outcomes (e.g. all-cause mortality
127  III,    10.  5.  2|              also with poorer health outcomes from other diseases such
128   IV,    11.  1.  3|           the contribution to health outcomes, disaggregating access to
129   IV,    11.  1.  3|             better population health outcomes; a consensus supported and
130   IV,    11.  1.  3|           market orientation; and by outcomes in terms of health attainment.
131   IV,    11.  1.  3|            are used to attain wanted outcomes – and, ultimately, to support
132   IV,    11.  1.  3|       practice of comparing hospital outcomes data in order to better
133   IV,    11.  1.  4|             the goal of equal health outcomes. Though there is evidence
134   IV,    11.  1.  5|          care, processes of care and outcomes of care (Donabedian, 1980).
135   IV,    11.  1.  5|          poor technical performance. Outcomes represent changes in health
136   IV,    11.  1.  5|             assessment, two types of outcomes are generally measured:
137   IV,    11.  1.  5| self-assessed and objective/clinical outcomes.~ ~Moreover, distinctions
138   IV,    11.  1.  5|       between strategies of care and outcomes~ ~Evidence that reporting
139   IV,    11.  1.  5|              seek to monitor patient outcomes through specific protocols
140   IV,    11.  1.  5|              of services. Similarly, outcomes targets make use of guidelines,
141   IV,    11.  1.  5|              financial incentives to outcomes is highly complex. For example,
142   IV,    11.  1.  6|          features or expenditure and outcomes.~ ~Health system productivity
143   IV,    11.  1.  6|       efficiency, equity and quality outcomes of health system financing.
144   IV,    11.  1.  6|           services, improve clinical outcomes and enhance patient safety
145   IV,    11.  2.  1|       healthcare and improved health outcomes (Macinko et al, 2003). Using
146   IV,    11.  6.  2|          drugs leads to worse health outcomes, therefore undermining any
147   IV,    11.  6.  4|          population health needs and outcomes, along with evaluation abilities
148   IV,    11.  6.  4|         costs, rather than assessing outcomes. However, Decision no. 1350/
149   IV,    11.  6.  4|       measures of changes in patient outcomes, that is, patient health
150   IV,    11.  6.  4|               Attributing changes in outcomes to medical care requires
151   IV,    11.  6.  4|              for benchmarking health outcomes. The first phase of the
152   IV,    11.  6.  5|       primary care systems to health outcomes within Organization for
153   IV,    11.  6.  5|        Review of Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes Research 5(1): 81-93.~ ~
154   IV,    11.  6.  5|               New Approaches for New Outcomes. P. Cox.~ ~Spooner A, Chapple
155   IV,    11.  6.  5|            Understanding Health Care Outcomes Research. Aspen Publishers,
156   IV,    12.  1    |        Treaty. However, the negative outcomes of the popular referenda
157   IV,    12.  2    |      services, and to improve cancer outcomes with clinical services.
158   IV,    12.  2    |        timely manner, achieve better outcomes than those not receiving
159   IV,    12. 10    |            in 2005 to achieve better outcomes for children by:~· Setting
160   IV,    12. 10    |            deliver the best possible outcomes for patients in line with
161   IV,    13.  7.  3|              infrequent problems and outcomes such as certain metabolic
162  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|           outbreak~outbreaks~outcome~outcomes~outdoor~out-of-pocket~out-patient~