Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  2    |        States facilitated very large increases in tourist flows between
  2    I,     2.  2    |            this market will initiate increases of service quality resulting
  3    I,     2.  3    |    experienced very important annual increases of inward migration and
  4    I,     2.  4    |              has led to considerable increases of the relative excess risk
  5    I,     2.  5    |             work-related stress also increases cardiovascular mortality (
  6    I,     2.  5    |      work-related stress, which also increases cardiovascular mortality.
  7    I,     2.  8    |             increased. Further major increases in nuclear power are not
  8    I,     2.  8    |         health; in fact, significant increases in prices of essential forms
  9    I,     2.  9    |          suggest further temperature increases in Europe between 1.05.
 10    I,     2.  9    |            Mediterranean region, and increases in the northeastern part
 11    I,     2.  9    |           will become more variable. Increases in water demand for agriculture (
 12    I,     2.  9    |          change, with mortality risk increases by between 0.2 and 5.5 %
 13    I,     2. 10.  4|              lines per market, which increases the costs of production
 14    I,     3.  2    |              increased by about 22%. Increases in population size were
 15    I,     3.  2    |            have witnessed population increases again. Several of the new
 16    I,     3.  2    |    experienced very important annual increases of inward migration and
 17    I,     3.  3    |              Turkey have the highest increases, while Sweden, the UK, Luxembourg,
 18   II,     4.  1    |          Over a long period of time, increases in life expectancy at birth (
 19   II,     5.  2.  4|              hypertension prevalence increases with age and that it is
 20   II,     5.  2.  4|             prevalence, as expected, increases with age and is higher among
 21   II,     5.  2.  5|            intensity as the CVD risk increases; treatment targets for LDL
 22   II,     5.  3.  3|             2006. The risk of cancer increases with age; furthermore, for
 23   II,     5.  3.  6|      actually decreased. Exceptional increases in 5-year relative survival
 24   II,     5.  3.  6|       colorectal and breast cancers.~Increases in survival and decreases
 25   II,     5.  3.  7|         perspective of 12 years (as increases in costs >5% are often difficult
 26   II,     5.  3.  7|          more relevant when survival increases.~ ~European Union activities
 27   II,     5.  3.  8|             treat cancer recurrences increases. At the same time, new knowledge
 28   II,     5.  4.  1|           impotence; this percentage increases substantially with diabetes
 29   II,     5.  4.  3|              Belgium. The percentage increases in the age groups above
 30   II,     5.  4.  3|  corresponding to Denmark. The trend increases with age. Results reported
 31   II,     5.  4.  4|    prevention, i.e. body mass index, increases with age. About 50% of the
 32   II,     5.  4.  4|            value of 14%. The problem increases with age, with a peak between
 33   II,     5.  5.  2|           reaching old age gradually increases, so does the number of people
 34   II,     5.  5.  3|               Girlsdissatisfaction increases with age: 28% for 11-year-olds,
 35   II,     5.  5.  3|              and the number of girls increases with age: from 12% for 11-
 36   II,     5.  5.  3|               Again, dissatisfaction increases with age: 12% for 11-year-olds,
 37   II,     5.  5.  3|        weight. Once again, the level increases with age (WHO, 2004).~Berkman
 38   II,     5.  6.  3|              of musculoskeletal pain increases mainly up to about 65 years
 39   II,     5.  6.  3|              is higher in women, and increases strongly with age.~ ~In
 40   II,     5.  6.  3|        disability associated with OA increases with progressive joint damage.~ ~
 41   II,     5.  6.  3|              and rate of progression increases with age.~ ~Prevalence~ ~
 42   II,     5.  6.  3|                 The prevalence of OA increases indefinitely with age as
 43   II,     5.  6.  3|            of hip fractures strongly increases with age, with rates of
 44   II,     5.  6.  3|    prevalence of vertebral deformity increases with age and is present
 45   II,     5.  6.  3|        strength. The risk of falling increases with age. Hip fracture may
 46   II,     5.  6.  3|              possibility of fracture increases when combining low bone
 47   II,     5.  8.  3|           that mortality due to COPD increases with age and is greater
 48   II,     5.  8.  7|             smoking cessation advice increases stop-smoking rate. Chest
 49   II,     5.  9.  3|         three disorders, 16 recorded increases, and 45 mixed changes (one
 50   II,     5.  9.  3|           three disorders, 20 showed increases, and 74 showed mixed changes.
 51   II,     5.  9.  3|      age-groups, more centres showed increases in all three disorders more
 52   II,     5. 11.  3|           Evidence that ear piercing increases the risk of gold sensitization
 53   II,     5. 11.  3|       authors to conclude that these increases could probably be explained
 54   II,     5. 14.  3|             in populations in Europe increases, dental caries has become
 55   II,     6.  3.  4|             active TB. HIV infection increases the likelihood of progression,
 56   II,     6.  3.  7|           The death rate is low, but increases with advancing age and may
 57   II,     6.  3.  7|              that repeated infection increases the risk of the more serious
 58   II,     8.  1.  3|            work ability due to LSHPD increases with age: reported prevalence
 59   II,     8.  2.  1|        importance as life expectancy increases (Walsh 2005). Reflecting
 60   II,     9        |              boys and the gender gap increases with age. The countries
 61   II,     9        |             inactivity.~ ~Ill health increases steadily with decreasing
 62   II,     9        |          Smoking cessation and small increases in the level of physical
 63   II,     9        |              80. The risk of falling increases exponentially with the number
 64   II,     9.  1.  2|      improvement in data quality and increases in risk factors may represent
 65   II,     9.  1.  2|          Particularly high rates and increases have been experienced in
 66   II,     9.  2.  4|              boys and the gender gap increases with age. The countries
 67   II,     9.  3.  1|      atherothrombotic CVD, incidence increases with age in women. Smoking
 68   II,     9.  3.  1|              of people with diabetes increases with age, but in addition
 69   II,     9.  3.  1|              distal forearm fracture increases with age, with incidence
 70   II,     9.  3.  1|              distal forearm fracture increases with age. Incidence rates
 71   II,     9.  3.  1|            populations worldwide and increases with age for both sexes.
 72   II,     9.  3.  1|         Kvien, 2004). As the disease increases in prevalence with age and
 73   II,     9.  3.  1|             inactivity.~ ~Ill health increases steadily with decreasing
 74   II,     9.  4.  2|              demonstrate age-related increases. However, the onset and
 75   II,     9.  4.  3|            fall; this figure further increases for those in residential
 76   II,     9.  4.  3|    demonstrate that the risk for men increases with age and that there
 77   II,     9.  4.  3|              of people with diabetes increases with age; in the 60-69 years
 78   II,     9.  4.  3|     regulation (IGR) prevalence also increases with age, affecting 25%
 79   II,     9.  4.  4|          Smoking cessation and small increases in the level of physical
 80   II,     9.  4.  4|              80. The risk of falling increases exponentially with the number
 81   II,     9.  4.  5|            train new staff as demand increases over the next decades; and
 82   II,     9.  5.  1|              women in the population increases through lifetime, women
 83   II,     9.  5.  1|              countries is related to increases in psychosocial stress and
 84   II,     9.  5.  3|               with the most striking increases in Luxembourg (2.7 kg),
 85   II,     9.  5.  3|            groups and the gender gap increases with age. Reduced physical activity
 86  III,    10.  1.  1|      physical activity contribute to increases in body weight (Wagner et
 87  III,    10.  1.  1|             to short term (1-3 days) increases in energy expenditure, while
 88  III,    10.  1.  1|            energy expenditure, while increases in physical activity are
 89  III,    10.  1.  1| automatically followed by equivalent increases in caloric intake (King,
 90  III,    10.  1.  1|        energy intake and expenditure increases: lean subjects demonstrate
 91  III,    10.  1.  1|            in this regard. Long-term increases in physical activity have
 92  III,    10.  1.  1|           activity are associated to increases in fat and decreases in
 93  III,    10.  1.  1|            to substantial heart rate increases.~ ~Figure 10.1.4 illustrates
 94  III,    10.  1.  3|        appetite response to moderate increases in exercise-induced energy
 95  III,    10.  2.  1|           inhaled into the lungs and increases with the quantity and speed
 96  III,    10.  2.  1|             and Luxembourg, recorded increases of 10 points or more over
 97  III,    10.  2.  1|          public transport.~· Regular increases in tobacco taxes should
 98  III,    10.  2.  1|              of drinking and driving increases with both the amount of
 99  III,    10.  2.  1|             particular risk. Alcohol increases the risk of attendance at
100  III,    10.  2.  1|           risk of alcohol dependence increases with both the volume of
101  III,    10.  2.  1|              lifetime alcohol intake increases the risk of harm. For example,
102  III,    10.  2.  1|         ethanol /day throughout life increases the risk of breast cancer
103  III,    10.  2.  1|             term exposure to alcohol increases the risk of liver cirrhosis
104  III,    10.  2.  1|       carcinogen; long term exposure increases the risk of cancers of the
105  III,    10.  2.  1|            raises blood pressure and increases the risk of hypertension
106  III,    10.  2.  1|              Episodic heavy drinking increases the risk of heart arrhythmias
107  III,    10.  2.  1|           for instance, produced net increases in police work, emergency
108  III,    10.  2.  1|          environment failed to deter increases in alcohol consumption.
109  III,    10.  2.  1|             health point of view2.~ ~Increases in the prevalence of cocaine
110  III,    10.  2.  1|           generally not for cocaine.~Increases in last year’s prevalence
111  III,    10.  2.  1|              but there are also some increases in heroin seizures and in
112  III,    10.  2.  1|             extent in young subjects increases with age, beginning with
113  III,    10.  2.  1|             inactivity substantially increases the risk for coronary heart
114  III,    10.  2.  1|             data, the highest annual increases in the prevalence of overweight
115  III,    10.  2.  4|              on all genomic variants increases or decreases the risk for
116  III,    10.  2.  5|           life, due to malnutrition, increases susceptibility to mental
117  III,    10.  2.  5|             action during early life increases the susceptibility for developing
118  III,    10.  3.  1|             radon. Exposure to radon increases significantly the risk for
119  III,    10.  3.  1|          childhood exposure to radon increases the risk of lung cancer
120  III,    10.  3.  1|            European countries. Sharp increases in melanoma frequency were
121  III,    10.  3.  2|             action during early life increases the susceptibility for developing
122  III,    10.  3.  2|               There have been recent increases in polybrominated diphenylethers (
123  III,    10.  3.  4|     countries have been experiencing increases in the severity and frequency
124  III,    10.  3.  4|              becoming a reality with increases in surface temperature,
125  III,    10.  3.  4|            to significant short-term increases in mortality. High temperatures
126  III,    10.  3.  4|             Urban heat island effect increases existing health risks in
127  III,    10.  3.  4|              still cause substantial increases in mortality if electricity
128  III,    10.  4.  1|     transport since 2000 have led to increases in the emissions of most
129  III,    10.  4.  1|         sensitive groups; second, it increases the interest for research
130  III,    10.  4.  2|            2005). This resulted from increases in the average number of
131  III,    10.  4.  5|          waste production is that it increases with the economic activity.
132  III,    10.  4.  5|        forecasts calling for further increases, along with the increasing
133  III,    10.  4.  5|        causality of the association. Increases in relative risk are difficult
134  III,    10.  5.  1|   encouraging suburban expansion and increases private local car transport
135  III,    10.  5.  1|     exposures: cooking and showering increases the relative humidity, the
136  III,    10.  5.  1|             human settlements and it increases with the size of the settlement
137  III,    10.  5.  1|      expansion of the built-up areas increases in a stronger mannner than
138  III,    10.  5.  3|             work-related stress also increases cardiovascular mortality.
139  III,    10.  5.  3|      work-related stress, which also increases cardiovascular mortality.~
140  III,    10.  6.  2|              and led to considerable increases of the relative excess risk
141   IV,    11.  2.  1|       experience with DMPs in Europe increases, and programmes extend beyond
142   IV,    11.  3.  2|            could be offset by volume increases. Furthermore, price control
143   IV,    11.  5.  4|            there have been sustained increases in the number of donors,
144   IV,    11.  6.  1|    expenditure across Europe include increases in labour costs, technological
145   IV,    11.  6.  2|           and Citizenship, 2000), it increases transparency and responsiveness (
146   IV,    11.  6.  2|             more; as the tax bracket increases, the financial benefit also
147   IV,    11.  6.  2|           the financial benefit also increases.~ ~ ~Out-of-pocket payments~ ~
148   IV,    11.  6.  2|         sharing but may also reflect increases in direct and/or informal
149   IV,    11.  6.  3|             mid-1980s. This not only increases income inequality but also
150   IV,    11.  6.  3|              to pay, private funding increases inequity because it shifts
151   IV,    11.  6.  4|         resource allocation. It also increases equity and solidarity principles
152   IV,    11.  6.  4|               healthier individuals) increases when budget allocations
153   IV,    12.  2    |            intensity as the CVD risk increases; treatment targets for LDL
154   IV,    12.  2    |           for instance, produced net increases in police work, in emergency
155   IV,    12.  2    |          environment failed to deter increases in alcohol consumption.
156   IV,    12. 10    |        waterpipe are also addressed.~Increases in tobacco taxes (5 steps
157   IV,    13.  5    |       disease and disability clearly increases with advancing age, poor