Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  9    |                 volume since 1850, with loss accelerating since the 1980s.
  2    I,     2. 10.  3|          services and on the other, the loss of jobs in redundant technologies
  3   II,     4.  1    |               signify compression and a loss of 5% to signify expansion
  4   II,     5.  1.  1|                 allergy, because of the loss of immune oral tolerance
  5   II,     5.  2.  1|          gradually, causing substantial loss of quality of life, disability,
  6   II,     5.  2.  1|         families and caregivers and the loss of years of productive life.~
  7   II,     5.  4.  1|       polydipsia and unexplained weight loss and /or a hyperglycaemia
  8   II,     5.  4.  1|                 constant hunger, weight loss, vision changes and fatigue.
  9   II,     5.  4.  1|                costs by diabetes due to loss of productivity may be as
 10   II,     5.  4.  1|          complications including vision loss, nerve and kidney damage),
 11   II,     5.  5.Int|           security systems and brings a loss of quality of life for those
 12   II,     5.  5.Int|          affected and their families, a loss of productivity for firms,
 13   II,     5.  5.  1|                are indirect and include loss of productivity due to sickness
 14   II,     5.  5.  1|               and working life, causing loss of productivity. Use of
 15   II,     5.  5.  1|         decrease in quality of life and loss of productivity.~ ~Suicide.
 16   II,     5.  5.  1|       competitiveness through premature loss of life. One study estimated
 17   II,     5.  5.  3|              with food, abnormal weight loss, difficulties in controlling
 18   II,     5.  5.  3|                   Anorexia as “appetite loss of nervous originsshows
 19   II,     5.  5.  3|                  body weight and weight loss, various magazines and television
 20   II,     5.  5.  3|          information on diet and weight loss (Harper et al, 2008). Websites
 21   II,     5.  5.  3|            quality of life, substantial loss of occupational and social
 22   II,     5.  5.  3|      characteristic behaviours include: loss of speech, repetitive hand-wringing,
 23   II,     5.  5.  3|              indirect costs (production loss due to sick-leave and early
 24   II,     5.  5.  3|              and at/not at risk for job loss);~o identifying demographic
 25   II,     5.  5.  3|              informal care and earnings loss are substantial (Whetten-Goldstein
 26   II,     5.  5.  3|              informal care and earnings loss will be critical for future
 27   II,     5.  5.  3|               onset after 60, no income loss was observed. In patients
 28   II,     5.  5.  3|           resource use and productivity loss due to 12 major diseases
 29   II,     5.  6.  3|         characterised by focal areas of loss of articular cartilage within
 30   II,     5.  6.  3|                in radiological changes (loss of joint space, sclerosis
 31   II,     5.  6.  3|         Osteoarthritis results in pain, loss of motion of affected joints,
 32   II,     5.  6.  3|                is a consequence of work loss, and of social and health
 33   II,     5.  6.  3|               impairment and possibly a loss of independence if she survives.
 34   II,     5.  6.  3|                9. Risk factors for bone loss, development of osteoporosis
 35   II,     5.  6.  3|               fracture results in pain, loss of mobility and excess mortality.
 36   II,     5.  6.  3|               with 20% mortality or 50% loss of function, with only 30%
 37   II,     5.  6.  3|              with comorbidity. Pain and loss of spinal movement cause
 38   II,     5.  6.  3|          aspects have an impact on work loss attributed to back pain
 39   II,     5.  6.  3|           economic consequences of work loss and social support.~ ~The
 40   II,     5.  6.  3|                 is indirect due to work loss and disablement reflecting
 41   II,     5.  6.  4|               to permanent or temporary loss of work ability. Permanent
 42   II,     5.  8.  1|                 be the seventh cause of loss of disability adjusted life
 43   II,     5.  8.  3|              with a global productivity loss of about €28.5 billion annually (
 44   II,     5.  9.  3|             public health resources and loss of workdays. For a better
 45   II,     5. 11.  1|              controlling water and heat loss of the body and is an important
 46   II,     5. 11.  3|                and disfiguring complete loss of pigment in the skin),
 47   II,     5. 11.  4|              impact~ ~Disability due to loss of function~Public sympathy
 48   II,     5. 11.  4|             itchy disorders, leading to loss of sleep for those who suffer
 49   II,     5. 11.  4|                e.g. acne) can result in loss of self-esteem, depression
 50   II,     5. 14.  1|              periodontal disease, tooth loss, oral mucosal lesions, oropharyngeal
 51   II,     5. 14.  1|         periodontal diseases can be the loss of attachment. This manifestation
 52   II,     5. 14.  1|               is a major cause of tooth loss after the age of 40-45.
 53   II,     5. 14.  2|           moderate to severe attachment loss in the general population
 54   II,     5. 14.  3|              concerns the rate of tooth loss in Europe (Figure 5.14.1).
 55   II,     5. 14.  3|                dental erosion, i.e. the loss of tooth enamel caused by
 56   II,     7.  4    |                  leading to an enormous loss of life years in good health.~•
 57   II,     7.  4    |           categories of injury, such as loss of productive years, disability
 58   II,     7.  4.  6|                suicide);~· life events (loss of a loved one, loss of
 59   II,     7.  4.  6|            events (loss of a loved one, loss of a job);~· psychological
 60   II,     8.  1.  1|                  leading to an enormous loss of life years in good health.~
 61   II,     8.  2.  2|              corresponding visual field loss to less than 20 degrees
 62   II,     8.  2.  2|              characterization of vision loss, low vision is replaced
 63   II,     8.  2.  2|              corresponding visual field loss to less than 10 degrees
 64   II,     8.  2.  2|              2005): Incidence of visual loss in the Ponza Eye Study,
 65   II,     8.  2.  2|              characterization of vision loss and visual functioning.
 66   II,     8.  2.  3|                          8.2.3. Hearing loss~ ~
 67   II,     8.  2.  3|            Sources~ ~Studies of hearing loss occurrence have been carried
 68   II,     8.  2.  3|         comparable estimates of hearing loss. While the prevalence of
 69   II,     8.  2.  3|               of disability for hearing loss due to ageing or noise exposure,
 70   II,     8.  2.  3|                  which excludes hearing loss due to congenital causes,
 71   II,     8.  2.  3|             injury (adult-onset hearing loss, ICD-10 codes H90-H91) (
 72   II,     8.  2.  3|             permanent childhood hearing loss ( 40 dB hearing loss in
 73   II,     8.  2.  3|            hearing loss ( 40 dB hearing loss in the better ear) has been
 74   II,     8.  2.  3|                showed 65 dB HL. Hearing loss appeared generally similarly
 75   II,     8.  2.  3|              slight to moderate hearing loss was more marked in men (
 76   II,     8.  2.  3|       Prevalence of adult onset hearing loss of at least moderate severity
 77   II,     8.  2.  3|       prevalence of adult onset hearing loss for adults aged 15 years
 78   II,     8.  2.  3|           causes of adult-onset hearing loss are presbycusis (age related
 79   II,     8.  2.  3|        presbycusis (age related hearing loss) followed by~noise-induced
 80   II,     8.  2.  3|                by~noise-induced hearing loss.~ ~From these data, age-standardized
 81   II,     8.  2.  3| age-standardized prevalence and hearing loss was estimated to be 3.3% (
 82   II,     8.  2.  3|               disability due to hearing loss has been estimated to amount,
 83   II,     8.  2.  3|                Global burden of hearing loss in the year 2000 (on-line
 84   II,     8.  2.  3|                  Acronyms~ ~HL:~Hearing Loss~ICF~WHO’s International
 85   II,     9        |            older people who suffer from loss of mental function and/or
 86   II,     9.  1.  2|             mortality, both in terms of loss of potential years of life
 87   II,     9.  3.  1|         menstruation resulting from the loss of ovarian follicular activity.
 88   II,     9.  3.  1|           security systems and brings a loss of quality of life for those
 89   II,     9.  3.  1|          affected and their families, a loss of productivity for firms,
 90   II,     9.  3.  1|                 one trigger of the heat loss phenomenon, but what is
 91   II,     9.  3.  1|       acquisition during growth or bone loss during adulthood. Ovarian
 92   II,     9.  3.  1|              skeletal homeostasis. Bone loss accelerates for a few years
 93   II,     9.  3.  1|              life. The mechanism of how loss of estrogen at menopause
 94   II,     9.  3.  1|          significantly to skeletal bone loss is not completely understood.
 95   II,     9.  3.  1|          understood. Postmenopause bone loss may be exacerbated by low
 96   II,     9.  3.  1|             calcium intake. Severe bone loss and fractures are not natural
 97   II,     9.  3.  1|              methods for detecting bone loss, many people are not routinely
 98   II,     9.  3.  1|            treatment to prevent further loss of bone mass or fractures
 99   II,     9.  3.  1|           intranasal spray.~ ~Oral bone loss. Oral bone, like the rest
100   II,     9.  3.  1|                lifespan. When oral bone loss exceeds gain, it manifests
101   II,     9.  3.  1|                  it manifests as either loss of tooth-anchoring support
102   II,     9.  3.  1|               partial or complete tooth loss. The prevalence of oral
103   II,     9.  3.  1|                 prevalence of oral bone loss is significant among adult
104   II,     9.  3.  1|               for both sexes. Oral bone loss and attendant tooth loss
105   II,     9.  3.  1|                loss and attendant tooth loss are associated to estrogen
106   II,     9.  3.  1|            vagina undergoes progressive loss of cells during menopause
107   II,     9.  3.  1|             vaginimus, and dispareunia. Loss of glycogen-producing cells,
108   II,     9.  3.  1|       Continence Society as involuntary loss of urine that is objectively
109   II,     9.  3.  1|            accompanied by visual acuity loss among older people, that
110   II,     9.  3.  1|             depressive symptoms such as loss of self esteem and feelings
111   II,     9.  3.  1|                symptoms, from a generic loss of energy to depression,
112   II,     9.  4.  4|            older people who suffer from loss of mental function and/or
113   II,     9.  4.  5|                by other pathologies and loss of function. Organised stroke
114   II,     9.  5.  3|        accidents, back pain and hearing loss (EU Agency for Health &
115  III,    10.  1.  1|              hypocaloric diet in weight loss significantly decreases
116  III,    10.  2.  1|             costs”, associated with the loss of human capital due to
117  III,    10.  2.  1|            older adults can retard bone loss and reduce the risk of fractures.
118  III,    10.  3.  1|              caused by UVR leads to the loss of up to 250 000 DALYs (
119  III,    10.  3.  2|                  nausea, increased hair loss, increased spontaneous abortion,
120  III,    10.  3.  4|            billions of euro of economic loss each year in the WHO European
121  III,    10.  3.  4|     displacement, damage to the home or loss of family possessions and
122  III,    10.  3.  4|     displacement, damage to the home or loss of familiar possessions.
123  III,    10.  3.  4|               droughts in Bulgaria. The loss of livelihoods resulting
124  III,    10.  4.  1|              Hungary, where the average loss in life expectancy may be
125  III,    10.  4.  1|               corresponds to an average loss of life expectancy of about
126  III,    10.  4.  1|          cardiovascular diseases.~ ~The loss of statistical life expectancy
127  III,    10.  4.  2|           cramps~disorientation, memory~loss; mortality~ ~EU regulations~ ~
128  III,    10.  4.  2|      responsible for significant health loss in DALYs (see chapter 9.
129  III,    10.  5.  3|               careers with a consequent loss of knowledge, skills and
130  III,    10.  5.  3|    tenosynovitis, noise-induced hearing loss, lateral epicondylitis,
131  III,    10.  5.  3|              and on the other hand, the loss of jobs in redundant technologies
132  III,    10.  5.  3|                  suffering and economic loss amounting to 45% of GDP.
133   IV,    11.  5.  4|              can result not only in the loss of the allograft but also
134   IV,    12.  5    |               signify compression and a loss of 5% to signify expansion
135   IV,    13.  2.  1|        important to quantify the health loss due to different diseases
136   IV,    13.  2.  2|                 Furthermore, the health loss due to exposures from the
137   IV,    13.  2.  2|                largest avoidable health loss.~ ~A summary table of the
138   IV,    13.  2.  2|         conditions are a major cause of loss disability adjusted life
139   IV,    13.  2.  2| radiation-induced melanoma leads to the loss of up to 250 000 DALYs annually
140   IV,    13.  2.  3|                comparison of the health loss (in DALYs) due to unhealthy
141   IV,    13.  2.  3|             carried out with the health loss due to a number of significant
142   IV,    13.  2.  3|                 that the overall health loss due to an unhealthy diet
143   IV,    13.  2.  3|        equivalent to the overall health loss due to the most common diseases
144   IV,    13.  2.  3|                 the demonstrable health loss due to microbiological contamination
145   IV,    13.  2.  3|               contamination, the health loss is lower than that of a
146   IV,    13.  2.  3|            factors. However, the health loss due to allergens and acrylamide
147   IV,    13.  2.  3|               Table 13.5. Annual health loss (in DALYs) due to dietary
148   IV,    13.  2.  3|           relates to the overall health loss due to the dietary composition (
149   IV,    13.  2.  3|                proportion of the health loss attributable to overweight (
150   IV,    13.  2.  3|               of overweight. The health loss due to overweight has been
151   IV,    13.  2.  3|            total abstinence. The health loss due to alcohol dependency
152   IV,    13.  5    |               contribute to the gradual loss of senses such as sight
153   IV,    13.  6.  1|               reaches school years, the loss of education also has a
154   IV,    13.  6.  1|                 child – not just by the loss of parental time, but possibly
155   IV,    13.  6.  1|           Anxiety, stress, and possibly loss of earning of the parent(
156   IV,    13.  6.  1|                 Effects on the child of loss of play, education, and