Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  4        |          various settings (at home, school, work). Also important are
  2    I,     2.  6        |             2.3) and of total early school leavers (Figure 2.4).~ ~
  3    I,     2.  6        |        systems.~ ~Figure 2.4. Early school leavers in EUGLOREH Countries,
  4    I,     2.  7        |         researchers from the London School of Economics.~ ~The large-scale
  5   II,     5.  2.  5    |            legislation and improved school meals. They used the media,
  6   II,     5.  5.Int(12)|             Health (Boston: Harvard School of Public Health, 117-135).~
  7   II,     5.  5.  3    |             group (students in high school or college, or athletes),
  8   II,     5.  5.  3    |           HBSC (Health Behaviour in School Aged Children) and is a
  9   II,     5.  5.  3    |   preventive health examinations of school children and unpublished
 10   II,     5.  5.  3    |   preventive health examinations of school children.~Sweden~ ~X~ ~Turkey~ ~
 11   II,     5.  5.  3    |           HBSC (Health Behaviour in School Aged Children) survey showed
 12   II,     5.  5.  3    |          National and international school nutrition policy as well
 13   II,     5.  5.  3    |            HBSC~Health Behaviour in School Aged Children~HELENA~Healthy
 14   II,     5.  5.  3    |    knowledge about epilepsy amongst school children should be encouraged.~ ~
 15   II,     5.  5.  3    |              1976): Record in grade school of pupils with epilepsy:
 16   II,     5.  9. FB    |  utilization, medication and missed school or work days. Allergic rhinitis
 17   II,     5.  9.  4    |          care (OR = 0.4) and infant school (OR = 0.4); a positive association
 18   II,     5. 11.  3    |            Böhme M, et al~ ~Swedish school children (5-6 yrs)~Lifetime
 19   II,     5. 11.  3    |          Broberg A, et al~ ~Italian school children (9 yrs)~Lifetime
 20   II,     5. 11.  3    |        Girolomoni G, et al~ ~Danish school children (12-16 yrs)~Lifetime
 21   II,     5. 11.  3    |           Schäfer T, et al~ ~Danish school children (12-16 yrs)~Prevalence=
 22   II,     5. 11.  3    |           Meding B, et al~ ~Swedish school children (16-19 yrs)~Point
 23   II,     5. 11.  3    |          Yngveson M, et al~ ~Danish school children aged 12-16 yrs~
 24   II,     5. 11.  3    |       treatments. In a study of 695 school children in London, where
 25   II,     5. 11.  3    |             Sweden found that 9% of school girls had nickel allergy,
 26   II,     5. 14.  2    |             actions mainly targeted school children. Collected data
 27   II,     5. 14.  3    |            European countries where school oral health programmes were
 28   II,     5. 14.  3    |          the region had established school dental services. Since 1989,
 29   II,     5. 14.  5    |          promoting oral health. The school years are an influential
 30   II,     7.  3.  4    |         fatally, either at home, at school, during leisure time and
 31   II,     7.  4.  4    |     children, physical education at school, organised activities in
 32   II,     7.  4.  6    |             2006).~ ~In the general school population, suicide prevention
 33   II,     7.  7        |           and Epidemiology, Medical School, Athens University.~ ~European
 34   II,     7.  7        |           and Epidemiology, Medical School, Athens University.~ ~European
 35   II,     8.  2.  1    |       children who have not entered school.~Population-based health
 36   II,     8.  2.  2    |           level and integrated into school health programmes; the need
 37   II,     9            |            educated only to primary school level have a higher risk
 38   II,     9            |            or are poor achievers at school, and tend not to be succeeding
 39   II,     9.  2.  2    |           Web link – ww ~ ~European School Survey Project on Alcohol
 40   II,     9.  2.  2    |            and 15 years, who attend school. This means that it obtains
 41   II,     9.  2.  2    |           of children not attending school means that small but significant
 42   II,     9.  2.  2    |            birth to early secondary school age), an important and vulnerable
 43   II,     9.  2.  2    |             risk, or outside of the school system i.e. truants and
 44   II,     9.  2.  2    |             social contexts such as school environment, family and
 45   II,     9.  2.  3    |       friend when anxious, in older school children, but leaves many
 46   II,     9.  2.  3    |           difficult to establish.~ ~School based suicide prevention
 47   II,     9.  2.  4    |            educated only to primary school level have a higher risk
 48   II,     9.  2.  4    |            or are poor achievers at school, and tend not to be succeeding
 49   II,     9.  2.  5    |          and education for those of school age admitted for more than
 50   II,     9.  3.  3    |           and fixed setting (a high school) in a stable population
 51   II,     9.  3.  3    |        increasing prominence of the school in the sexual education
 52   II,     9.  3.  3    |             the association between school sex education and risk reduction
 53   II,     9.  3.  3    |   especially drug and alcohol use), school and community bonding, school
 54   II,     9.  3.  3    |       school and community bonding, school performance and parental
 55   II,     9.  3.  3    |        adolescents in a Danish high school in 1982, 1996, and 2001.
 56   II,     9.  5.  3    |            educated only to primary school level have a higher risk
 57   II,     9.  5.  3    |            or are poor achievers at school, and tend not to be succeeding
 58   II,     9.  5.  3    |          Lindholm, 1995). Access to school sports facilities may be
 59   II,     9.  5.  6    |      Physical Education. In Primary School Physical Education. (Edited
 60   II,     9.  5.  6    |       University and Woodrow Wilson School and Department of Economics,
 61  III,    10.  1.  3    |             in relation to peer and school factors. Results of multilevel
 62  III,    10.  2.  1    |         Data from the 2003 European School Survey Project on Alcohol
 63  III,    10.  2.  1    |   systematic reviews have evaluated school based education which aimed
 64  III,    10.  2.  1    |            Addiction~ESPAD~European School Survey Project on Alcohol
 65  III,    10.  2.  1    |         HBSC~Health Behaviour among School Children~HBV~Hepatitis B
 66  III,    10.  2.  1    |            can begin as early as in school age. According to the 2003
 67  III,    10.  2.  1    |          and 13% (on average 4%) of school children reported having
 68  III,    10.  2.  1    |          was reported by 0 to 8% of school children with 6 EU countries
 69  III,    10.  2.  1    |             been used by 0 to 7% of school children, with 4 EU countries
 70  III,    10.  2.  1    |    prevalence of cannabis use among school children between 1995 and
 71  III,    10.  2.  1    |           different groups at-risk (school drop-outs, cannabis users)
 72  III,    10.  2.  1    |       Available at: htt ~ ~European School Survey Project on Alcohol
 73  III,    10.  2.  1    |           Handbook for Implementing School Surveys on Drug Abuse .
 74  III,    10.  2.  1    |             include children not in school. Information available through
 75  III,    10.  2.  1    |           disease for preschool and school children as part of the
 76  III,    10.  2.  1    |             of the health-promoting school activities; (iii) for those
 77  III,    10.  2.  1    | disadvantaged communities. Fluoride school based programmes are effective
 78  III,    10.  2.  1    |           WHO information series on School Health (document eleven)
 79  III,    10.  2.  1    |       element of a health-promoting school. WHO, Geneva, Switzerland.~ ~
 80  III,    10.  2.  1    |         walking or cycling to work, school or shopping, swimming, housework,
 81  III,    10.  2.  1    |        children to walk or cycle to school or play outdoors, especially
 82  III,    10.  2.  1    |        other settings – at home, at school, at work and so on – often
 83  III,    10.  2.  1    |            of physical education at school and the way it is organized
 84  III,    10.  2.  1    |          for the preparation of the School Fruit Scheme~SCF~Scientific
 85  III,    10.  2.  1    |         sample of Italian secondary school students (Leclerq et al,
 86  III,    10.  2.  1    |             A survey in Bulgaria of school children’s eating habits.~ :~
 87  III,    10.  2.  1    |        interventions at individual, school, workplace and community
 88  III,    10.  2.  1    |          interventions based on the school fruit scheme or for the
 89  III,    10.  2.  1    |       overweight. It states that “a School Fruit Scheme would be a
 90  III,    10.  2.  1    |       forward with a proposal for a school fruit scheme as soon as
 91  III,    10.  2.  1    |              the presentation of a 'School Fruit Scheme' proposal will
 92  III,    10.  2.  1    |          with experts, promoters of school fruit schemes, stakeholders
 93  III,    10.  2.  1    |        process can be found on the 'School Fruit Scheme' webpage:~http://
 94  III,    10.  2.  1    |             options for a European 'School Fruit Scheme':~Option 1 –
 95  III,    10.  2.  1    |            communication routes via school programmes, pharmacies (
 96  III,    10.  2.  1    |       development of pre-school and school nutrition and food safety
 97  III,    10.  2.  1    |    Direction of Health, Division of School Medicine (2004): L’excès
 98  III,    10.  2.  1    |    Direction of Health, Division of School Medicine (in French).~ ~
 99  III,    10.  2.  1    |          University College Medical School.~[ht ] (report online, accessed
100  III,    10.  2.  1    |           overweight and obesity in school and worksite settings: a
101  III,    10.  2.  1    |     overweight and obesity in Irish school children, using four different
102  III,    10.  2.  1    |             homocysteine levels and school performance [dissertation].
103  III,    10.  3.  1    |         poor performance at work or school. In spite of the limited
104  III,    10.  3.  1    |           the UVR index, UVR health school programmes, the regulation
105  III,    10.  5.  1    |         Schools~ ~For children, the school environment is the most
106  III,    10.  5.  1    |        environment, besides home.~ ~School studies, mainly from North
107  III,    10.  5.  1    |          comparative studies on the school environment in different
108  III,    10.  5.  1    |         Classroom levels of PM10 in school may exceed the recommended
109  III,    10.  5.  1    |           in non-European contexts: school studies from China and South
110  III,    10.  5.  1    |          Wyon, 2007b). Although the school is the work environment
111  III,    10.  5.  1    |  environment for teachers and other school personnel, there are less
112  III,    10.  5.  1    |            associations between the school environment and teachers
113  III,    10.  5.  1    |      teachers are all a part of the school environment (Norbäck, 1997).~ ~
114  III,    10.  5.  1    |      Information BulletinWalking School BusAvailable at: htt ~ ~
115  III,    10.  5.  1    |         Indoor allergens in settled school dust: a review of findings
116  III,    10.  6.  1    |        among 11, 13 and 15 year old school children. The study includes
117  III,    10.  6.  1    |        friends, and peer support in school). The HBSC survey covers
118  III,    10.  6.  1    |          data on social networks of school children. These include
119  III,    10.  6.  1    |             children. These include school children’s experienced quality
120  III,    10.  6.  1    |            EU countries, Lithuanian school children made a more often
121  III,    10.  6.  1    |           of the 15-year old Danish school girls accounted for 83%
122  III,    10.  6.  1    |       contact was used by Hungarian school children. Among 11 year
123  III,    10.  6.  2    |          various settings (at home, school, work). Also important are
124  III,    10.  6.  2    |      practitioneraims at reducing school non-attendance rates due
125  III,    10.  6.  2    |        Pupils who are not attending school because of self reported
126  III,    10.  6.  2    |         people from dropping out of school and thus having no job opportunities.~·
127  III,    10.  6.  3(45)|       instance in a pub, street, at school, on public transport, in
128  III,    10.  6.  3(46)|            a pub, in the street, at school, on public transport, on
129   IV,    11.  3.  1    |           included limiting medical school intake. From 1990 to 2005,
130   IV,    11.  3.  1    |            typical training medical school in Europe is 5-6 years,
131   IV,    11.  6.  5    |          europe. Cambridge, Harvard School of Public Health.~ ~Blendon
132   IV,    11.  6.  5    |            Social Exclusion, London School of Economics and Political
133   IV,    12.  2        |            legislation and improved school meals. They used the media,
134   IV,    12.  2        |   systematic reviews have evaluated school based education which aimed
135   IV,    12.  3        |             on volunteers mobility, school cooperation and educational
136   IV,    12. 10        |   prophylaxis for groups in nursery school and primary schools carried
137   IV,    12. 10        |             disposed to children by school buffets. Also, according
138   IV,    12. 10        |           and health (in compulsory school grade 9 (15-16 years) and
139   IV,    12. 10        |          grade from upper secondary school (18-19 years)~ ~ ~Domain
140   IV,    12. 10        |       Education policy~Child policy~School environment~Children's and
141   IV,    12. 10        |             of grades in compulsory school (m)~Domain of objective
142   IV,    13.  5        |          various settings (at home, school, work). Also important are
143   IV,    13.  6.  1    |              Once the child reaches school years, the loss of education
144   IV,    13.  6.  2    |                            13.6.2.4 School Health and Adolescent Health
145   IV,    13.  6.  2    |          and screening services for school children and adolescents.
146   IV,    13.  6.  2    |          The traditional pattern of school health service, with an
147   IV,    13.  6.  2    |         service, with an identified school nurse, or doctor, screening
148   IV,    13.  6.  2    |            The advisory role of the school health service is also important.
149   IV,    13.  6.  2    |            anxiety or depression, a school health professional may
150  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0    |       sanitation~sars~schizophrenia~school~schools~scleroderma~sclerosis~