Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1    I,     2.  7    |           contemporary cities. These events have provided important
  2    I,     2.  7    |               a financial centre, an events pavilion and large spaces
  3    I,     2.  9    |     altitudes, changes in life-cycle events (phenology), for example
  4    I,     2.  9    |           and the timing of seasonal events of both pests and pollinators
  5    I,     2.  9    |      consequence of extreme climatic events, e.g. the summer heat of
  6    I,     2.  9    |       drought of 2007. Since extreme events are projected to increase
  7    I,     2.  9    |            and more frequent extreme events. The risk is very dependent
  8    I,     2.  9    |            health of extreme weather events (floods, storms, droughts,
  9    I,     2. 10.  4|              30% of all adverse drug events are preventable and appear
 10    I,     2. 10.  4|        seriously injured, in adverse events involving medical devices.
 11    I,     2. 10.  4|           being first (37.4% of such events). 10~ ~Medication errors
 12   II,     5.  1.  1|          cancer in women include the events of reproductive life and
 13   II,     5.  2.Acr|       through intervention to reduce events~EUROCISS~European Cardiovascular
 14   II,     5.  2.  1|           more suffer from non-fatal events (Allender et al, 2008; Petersen
 15   II,     5.  2.  2|   recommended because below 35 years events are rare and above 74 years
 16   II,     5.  2.  2|           and 84 years the number of events doubles. Above 84 years
 17   II,     5.  2.  2|              as mean annual coronary events rates derived from 10-year
 18   II,     5.  2.  2|            Annual change in coronary events and 28 day-case fatality
 19   II,     5.  2.  2|              in- and out-of-hospital events) is affected by severity
 20   II,     5.  2.  2|              Annual change in stroke events and 28-day case fatality
 21   II,     5.  2.  2|              in- and out-of-hospital events) is affected by severity
 22   II,     5.  2.  3|          morbidity of acute coronary events - although collected till
 23   II,     5.  2.  3|            surveillance for coronary events and 28-day case fatality
 24   II,     5.  2.  3|         first and recurrent coronary events represent the most valid
 25   II,     5.  2.  3|     population. Mean annual coronary events rates (fatal and non fatal
 26   II,     5.  2.  3|         hospital first and recurrent events) per 100.000 during 10-year
 27   II,     5.  2.  3|              the number of diagnosed events, thus making the interpretation
 28   II,     5.  2.  3|             range 75-84 years stroke events double in both men and women:
 29   II,     5.  2.  3|         hospitalized cerebrovascular events allowing delineation of
 30   II,     5.  2.  3|              surveillance for stroke events and 28-day case fatality
 31   II,     5.  2.  3|              of all non-fatal stroke events and one tenth of all fatal
 32   II,     5.  2.  3|            tenth of all fatal stroke events occur in this age range,
 33   II,     5.  2.  3| out-of-hospital, first and recurrent events) is higher in populations
 34   II,     5.  2.  3|       average attack rate per stroke events (fatal and non fatal) per
 35   II,     5.  2.  3|          trend in 10 years of stroke events .~ ~In brief, the declining
 36   II,     5.  2.  3|            suggest that acute stroke events have become milder and that
 37   II,     5.  2.  4|       through intervention to reduce events’ (EUROASPIRE) surveys, presented
 38   II,     5.  2.  6|              fatal and non fatal CVD events. The reduction is larger
 39   II,     5.  2.  6|       reduction is larger for stroke events, while the reduction of
 40   II,     5.  2.  6|            the reduction of coronary events is less large, but nevertheless
 41   II,     5.  2.  6|              on major cardiovascular events: results of prospectively-designed
 42   II,     5.  2.  7|      nonfatal coronary heart disease events. JAMA 290: 891-897.~Gru ).
 43   II,     5.  3.  4|          cancer in women include the events of reproductive life and
 44   II,     5.  5.  3|        vomiting to gain control over events and emotions; thereby, unhealthy
 45   II,     5.  5.  3|           toxic or metabolic). These events (provoked or acute symptomatic
 46   II,     5.  5.  3|          Unprovoked seizures include events occurring in the absence
 47   II,     5.  7.  7|            to prevent cardiovascular events: a pharmacoeconomic analysis
 48   II,     5.  7.  7|             of death, cardiovascular events, and hospitalization. N
 49   II,     5.  8.  7|            Factor for Cardiovascular Events? COPD: Journal of Chronic
 50   II,     5.  9.  6|           can be more stressful than events that can be anticipated
 51   II,     5. 11.  3|           rhinitis; this sequence of events is sometimes referred to
 52   II,     6.  4.  2|      effective response by the EU to events (including emergencies)
 53   II,     6.  4.  2|           States should inform about events likely to affect public
 54   II,     6.  4.  2|     successfully used in a number of events such as SARS, avian influenza
 55   II,     7.  4.  6|          history of suicide);~· life events (loss of a loved one, loss
 56   II,     7.  4.  7|              victims to report these events. In the framework of the
 57   II,     9        |       inhibitors reduce risk for CHD events in women as well as in men.
 58   II,     9        |      reduction in risk for major CHD events in women, similar to the
 59   II,     9.  1.  1|   association with adverse perinatal events. CP is an umbrella term
 60   II,     9.  2.  3|         iceberg, while for non-fatal events there is little available
 61   II,     9.  3.  1|              outcomes after coronary events or revascularization. Reasons
 62   II,     9.  3.  1|            be used when referring to events of the climacteric. This
 63   II,     9.  3.  1|              of phase with endocrine events. In many, the endometrium
 64   II,     9.  3.  1|       inhibitors reduce risk for CHD events in women as well as in men.
 65   II,     9.  3.  1|      reduction in risk for major CHD events in women, similar to the
 66   II,     9.  3.  2|              using a small number of events and total births, whilst
 67   II,     9.  4.  3|              20 to 30% of all stroke events; this can be as high as
 68  III,    10.  1.  1|            as well as stressful life events in general and to ameliorate
 69  III,    10.  1.  1|            stress and stressful life events. Life events can both increase
 70  III,    10.  1.  1|          stressful life events. Life events can both increase and decrease
 71  III,    10.  2.  1|        related accidents and violent events related to alcohol take
 72  III,    10.  2.  1|      Contents are mostly information events and, to a lesser extent,
 73  III,    10.  2.  3|              fatal and non fatal CVD events. The reduction is larger
 74  III,    10.  2.  3|       reduction is larger for stroke events, while the reduction of
 75  III,    10.  2.  3|            the reduction of coronary events is less large, but nevertheless
 76  III,    10.  2.  5|             Early life environmental events have persisting effects
 77  III,    10.  2.  5|           children who have coronary events as adults. N Engl J Med
 78  III,    10.  3.  4|           Programme~EM-DAT~Emergency Events Data Base~EU ETS~EU emissions
 79  III,    10.  3.  4|              and 2006, the Emergency Events Data Base (EM-DAT, htt ),
 80  III,    10.  3.  4|  collaborating centrerecorded 323 events, causing 76.250 deaths in
 81  III,    10.  3.  4|        overview on different extreme events and the impacts these have (
 82  III,    10.  3.  4|            trends in extreme weather events~ ~ ~Phenomenon and trend~
 83  III,    10.  3.  4|     frequency of heavy precipitation events over most areas~Very likely~
 84  III,    10.  3.  4|          CRED) operates an Emergency Events Database (EM-DAT). EM-DAT
 85  III,    10.  3.  4|             database on all disaster events occurring in the world is
 86  III,    10.  3.  4|         frequency of extreme weather events. These events are putting
 87  III,    10.  3.  4|        extreme weather events. These events are putting many people
 88  III,    10.  3.  4|        considerable. Extreme weather events such as major floods are
 89  III,    10.  3.  4|         fertility.~ ~Extreme weather events~ ~Table 10.3.4.2 gives an
 90  III,    10.  3.  4|             4.2 gives an overview of events recorded in European Union
 91  III,    10.  3.  4|       countries. Extreme temperature events, specifically the heat-waves
 92  III,    10.  3.  4|             more details on specific events: on extreme temperature
 93  III,    10.  3.  4|               on extreme temperature events as the event having caused
 94  III,    10.  3.  4|          storms as the most frequent events and on droughts as the extreme
 95  III,    10.  3.  4|          damage from extreme weather events in 25 European Union countries,
 96  III,    10.  3.  4|          extreme rainfall and runoff events may increase the total microbial
 97  III,    10.  3.  4|         mortality following flooding events .~ ~Figure 10.3.4.2. Frequency
 98  III,    10.  3.  4|        increasingly frequent weather events that are likely to become
 99  III,    10.  4.  1|            focusing more and more on events during foetal life and early
100  III,    10.  4.  2|              system and networks for events involving exposure to radio-chemicals
101  III,    10.  4.  2|          exceptional epidemiological events are published, on receipt,
102  III,    10.  4.  2|       unwanted consequences (adverse events) is described, including
103  III,    10.  4.  2|        difficult or, in case of rare events, impossible to carry out.
104  III,    10.  4.  2|         webcasting, participation in events and conference , as well
105  III,    10.  4.  2|         information materials, press events and information for the
106  III,    10.  4.  3|      causative agents, although such events occur throughout the European
107  III,    10.  5.  1|              protection from outside events to the dwellers, any kind
108  III,    10.  5.  3|           additionally to 1900 fatal events (table 10.5.3.2). The incidence
109   IV,    11.  1.  5|             of learning from adverse events. This followed a Department
110   IV,    11.  1.  5|          system of reporting adverse events. Data are held anonymously
111   IV,    11.  1.  5|             communication on adverse events is also used as a manner
112   IV,    11.  1.  5|          accounting for most adverse events (81.8%) (Wilson et al, 1995).
113   IV,    11.  1.  5|          have avoidable adverse drug events and, consequently, have
114   IV,    11.  1.  5|     difficult.~ ~Not only do adverse events represent a concern for
115   IV,    11.  5.  3|            reporting serious adverse events, whereas in other 12 the
116   IV,    11.  5.  4|        serious or unexpected adverse events.~Many times an organ donor
117   IV,    12.  2    |          related crashes and violent events related to alcohol take
118   IV,    12.  5    |      immunisation status and adverse events monitoring.~ ~1.1.3. Develop
119   IV,    12. 10    |        Regional~ Yes~Extreme weather events and health~High~National/
120   IV,    12. 10    |         safety~ ~ ~ ~Extreme weather events and health~ ~ ~ ~Socio-economic
121   IV,    12. 10    |         online-reporting of critical events, see www. de and www. de~
122   IV,    12. 10    |       implemented.~ ~Extreme weather events and health~Intermediate
123   IV,    12. 10    |           effects of extreme weather events (2003 heat wave, Elbe flooding,
124   IV,    12. 10    |           related to extreme weather events. Several Federal States
125   IV,    12. 10    |         modalities.~Finally, special events (including free disposal
126   IV,    12. 10    |              e.g TV spots, leaflets, events etc) for saving water~Soil
127   IV,    12. 10    |             Municipalities different events at big commercial points,
128   IV,    12. 10    |        campaign (TV spots, leaflets, events) is running in order to
129   IV,    12. 10    |        regulations~ ~Extreme weather events and health~ high~o The direction
130   IV,    12. 10    |           disorders (through special events and campaign programs) and
131   IV,    12. 10    |           this topic~Extreme weather events and health~ high~ Decree
132   IV,    12. 10    |             Strategy~Extreme weather events and health~low~ ~ ~Poverty~
133   IV,    12. 10    |              level~ ~Extreme weather events and health~ High~ National
134   IV,    12. 10    |              traffic~Extreme weather events and health~ high~Decision
135   IV,    12. 10    |            Programme~Extreme weather events and health~Intermediate~
136   IV,    13.  7.  5|       quality, as double counting of events cannot be prevented, and