Part,  Chapter, Paragraph

  1   II,     5.  1.  1|           major role in predicting stroke; elevated total and LDL
  2   II,     5.  1.  1|           including heart disease, stroke, obstructive pulmonary disease
  3   II,     5.  2.  1|           459), including cerebral stroke (ICD 9: 430-438).~The most
  4   II,     5.  2.  1|            heart disease (IHD) and stroke. Ischemic heart disease
  5   II,     5.  2.  1|         Ischemic heart disease and stroke, are the main killers in
  6   II,     5.  2.  1|            in eight women die from stroke.~ ~Cardiovascular disease (
  7   II,     5.  2.  1|            to health expenditures. Stroke is the second leading cause
  8   II,     5.  2.  2|          difficult to realize. For stroke, data were age-standardized
  9   II,     5.  2.  2|      difficult to determine actual stroke due to co-morbidity; including
 10   II,     5.  2.  2|           circulatory system (IHD, stroke and other CVD), cancer and
 11   II,     5.  2.  2|    myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke; these data are scarce,
 12   II,     5.  2.  2|                           5.2.2.2. Stroke~ ~Mortality~Following the
 13   II,     5.  2.  2|     mortality rates (htt u, 2007). Stroke mortality was defined as
 14   II,     5.  2.  2|                2007) were used for stroke; these data are scarce,
 15   II,     5.  2.  2|            ICD morbidity codes for stroke (ICD-9 430-438; ICD-10 I60-I69,
 16   II,     5.  2.  2|          range 35-64 years as mean stroke attack rates derived from
 17   II,     5.  2.  2|     surveillance. Annual change in stroke events and 28-day case fatality
 18   II,     5.  2.  2|        standard. The definition of stroke used in the WHO-MONICA Project (htt /,
 19   II,     5.  2.  2|           major role in predicting stroke; elevated total and LDL
 20   II,     5.  2.  3|      country, data on IHD, AMI and stroke hospital discharges are
 21   II,     5.  2.  3|            all CVD and for IHD and stroke. Opposite to the common
 22   II,     5.  2.  3|   hospitalizations are for AMI and stroke, in almost all countries
 23   II,     5.  2.  3|         from all CVD, IHD,AMI, and stroke Last year available, all
 24   II,     5.  2.  3|                           5.2.3.2. Stroke~Data on morbidity and mortality
 25   II,     5.  2.  3|       group, including sequelae of stroke, therefore it is not possible
 26   II,     5.  2.  3|          haemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, which are characterized
 27   II,     5.  2.  3|          countries more difficult. Stroke units have been shown to
 28   II,     5.  2.  3|            the case fatality after stroke.~ ~Mortality~Stroke alone
 29   II,     5.  2.  3|          after stroke.~ ~Mortality~Stroke alone is the second single
 30   II,     5.  2.  3|             Allender et al, 2008). Stroke mortality is higher in men
 31   II,     5.  2.  3|           Among people aged 35-84, stroke accounts for 10% of all-cause
 32   II,     5.  2.  3|          the age range 75-84 years stroke events double in both men
 33   II,     5.  2.  3|             this demonstrates that stroke is a disease that mainly
 34   II,     5.  2.  3|      elderly.~Mortality trends for stroke in men are shown in Figure
 35   II,     5.  2.  3|        trends from 1993 to 2002 in stroke mortality were more favourable
 36   II,     5.  2.  3|             Table 5.2.2 also shows stroke hospital discharge rates
 37   II,     5.  2.  3|          ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke are not available.~ ~The
 38   II,     5.  2.  3|          years of surveillance for stroke events and 28-day case fatality
 39   II,     5.  2.  3|         one third of all non-fatal stroke events and one tenth of
 40   II,     5.  2.  3|         and one tenth of all fatal stroke events occur in this age
 41   II,     5.  2.  3|       changes in the management of stroke or changes in disease severity (
 42   II,     5.  2.  3|            average attack rate per stroke events (fatal and non fatal)
 43   II,     5.  2.  3|        annual trend in 10 years of stroke events .~ ~In brief, the
 44   II,     5.  2.  3|            the declining trends of stroke mortality during the last
 45   II,     5.  2.  3|           years suggest that acute stroke events have become milder
 46   II,     5.  2.  3|         and that the prevalence of stroke survivors is increasing.
 47   II,     5.  2.  3|           dramatically increase in stroke mortality for men and women
 48   II,     5.  2.  6|            al, 2006). The ischemic stroke risk was also diminished
 49   II,     5.  2.  6|         even if the association of stroke with plasma cholesterol
 50   II,     5.  2.  6|          with an increased risk of stroke, of CHD and of peripheral
 51   II,     5.  2.  6|            reduction is larger for stroke events, while the reduction
 52   II,     5.  2.  7|     profile (Low Risk) and 10-year stroke incidence in women and men:
 53   II,     5.  2.  7|          changes in mortality from stroke caused by changes in stroke
 54   II,     5.  2.  7|        stroke caused by changes in stroke event rates or case fatality?.
 55   II,     5.  2.  7|           rates or case fatality?. Stroke 34:1833-1841~Thom TJ (1989):
 56   II,     5.  2.  7|          factors explain trends in Stroke event rates? Comparisons
 57   II,     5.  2.  7|    countries within the WHO MONICA stroke project. Stroke 33:2367-
 58   II,     5.  2.  7|         WHO MONICA stroke project. Stroke 33:2367-2375.~Tunstall-Pedoe
 59   II,     5.  4.  1|          myocardial infarction and stroke). Long duration of hyperglycaemia
 60   II,     5.  4.  1|           myocardial infarction or stroke. ~Diabetes is recognised
 61   II,     5.  4.  2|       aggravated heart disease and stroke, - should be formulated
 62   II,     5.  4.  2|   population~9~Annual incidence of stroke in diabetic patients /100,
 63   II,     5.  4.  2|            The annual incidence of stroke is defined as the number
 64   II,     5.  4.  2|           number of new cases with stroke (both ischemic and bleeding)
 65   II,     5.  4.  3|            The annual incidence of stroke. In EUCID, a total of 10
 66   II,     5.  4.  4|        renal failure, amputations, stroke, myocardial infarction,
 67   II,     5.  5.  3|   epileptogenic conditions such as stroke and degenerative CNS disorders)
 68   II,     5.  6.  3|              84 after dementia and stroke.~ ~Osteoarthritis~ ~Definition~ ~
 69   II,     5.  8.  3|           up to diabetes, cerebral stroke, malignant tumour.~ ~An
 70   II,     5.  8.  3|             hypertension, obesity, stroke, hyper-lipidemia, ventricular
 71   II,     5. 14.  4|           including heart disease, stroke, obstructive pulmonary disease
 72   II,     8.  2.  1|       include serious head injury, stroke, or certain infections such
 73   II,     9        |        imperative. Despite similar stroke rates, women are more likely
 74   II,     9        |          likely than men to die of stroke. The main risk factors for
 75   II,     9        |          The main risk factors for stroke are not gender dependant.
 76   II,     9        |           statins) reduce risk for stroke, as do antihypertensive
 77   II,     9        |        over 20% of CHD, and 10% of stroke in developed countries is
 78   II,     9.  3.  1|          about half of deaths, and stroke, responsible for about one
 79   II,     9.  3.  1|         However, a woman who has a stroke or a heart attackespecially
 80   II,     9.  3.  1|          circulatory diseases) and stroke (one third of deaths from
 81   II,     9.  3.  1|      average (WHO HFA-DB, 2006).~ ~Stroke. Stroke is an important
 82   II,     9.  3.  1|           HFA-DB, 2006).~ ~Stroke. Stroke is an important cause of
 83   II,     9.  3.  1|            under the age of 65 for stroke is decreasing for both sexes
 84   II,     9.  3.  1|        imperative. Despite similar stroke rates, women are more likely
 85   II,     9.  3.  1|          likely than men to die of stroke. The main risk factors for
 86   II,     9.  3.  1|          The main risk factors for stroke are not gender dependant.
 87   II,     9.  3.  1|           statins) reduce risk for stroke, as do antihypertensive
 88   II,     9.  3.  1|        over 20% of CHD, and 10% of stroke in developed countries is
 89   II,     9.  4.  2|      specific fatal diseases (e.g. stroke) and non-fatal diseases (
 90   II,     9.  4.  2|        chronic disability, such as stroke or heart attack, can affect
 91   II,     9.  4.  3|      suffer from heart disease and stroke, but as women age, these
 92   II,     9.  4.  3|        view that heart disease and stroke are exclusively men’s problems
 93   II,     9.  4.  3|          heart diseases as well as stroke and other cerebro-vascular
 94   II,     9.  4.  3|       Health Men’s Forum, 2003).~ ~Stroke. Recurrent strokes typically
 95   II,     9.  4.  3|         for about 20 to 30% of all stroke events; this can be as high
 96   II,     9.  4.  3|      showed that the prevalence of stroke increased from 5% in people
 97   II,     9.  4.  3|     thought that older people with stroke had a short survival time;
 98   II,     9.  4.  3|        2001). Age can affect after stroke outcomes. It is likely that
 99   II,     9.  4.  3|       require greater care after a stroke than younger counterparts.
100   II,     9.  4.  3|    counterparts. A recent study of stroke care for older patients
101   II,     9.  4.  3|      European countries found that stroke care varies considerably.
102   II,     9.  4.  3|           gain access to organised stroke care in many centres, but
103   II,     9.  4.  5|            care of older people.~ ~Stroke Care. Five out of six of
104   II,     9.  4.  5|            of those suffering from stroke are aged over 60 and this
105   II,     9.  4.  5|        loss of function. Organised stroke care represents a practical
106   II,     9.  4.  7|             2004): Abstract: Older stroke patients in Europe: stroke
107   II,     9.  4.  7|         stroke patients in Europe: stroke care and determinants of
108   II,     9.  4.  7|           Clinical epidemiology of stroke. CME Journal Geriatric Medicine;
109   II,     9.  5.  3|        over 20% of CHD, and 10% of stroke in developed countries is
110  III,    10.  2.  1|     diseases~Childen~Adults~Larinx~Stroke~Brain tumors*~Stroke*~Oropharinx~
111  III,    10.  2.  1|        Larinx~Stroke~Brain tumors*~Stroke*~Oropharinx~Blindness, cataract~
112  III,    10.  2.  1|          oral cavity, haemorrhagic stroke, hypertension, pancreatitis
113  III,    10.  2.  1|      hypertension and haemorrhagic stroke in a dose dependent manner.
114  III,    10.  2.  1|           and the risk of ischemic stroke. Episodic heavy drinking
115  III,    10.  2.  1|         e.g. violence, accidents), stroke and liver disease (across
116  III,    10.  2.  1|            obesity, heart disease, stroke, cancers, diabetes and mental
117  III,    10.  2.  1|            obesity, heart disease, stroke, cancers, diabetes and mental
118  III,    10.  2.  1|         heart disease and ischemic stroke, and about a quarter of
119  III,    10.  2.  2|            incidence. The ischemic stroke risk was also diminished
120  III,    10.  2.  2|         even if the association of stroke with plasma cholesterol
121  III,    10.  2.  3|          with an increased risk of stroke, CHD or peripheral vascular
122  III,    10.  2.  3|          relationship with risk of stroke and CHD, progressively and
123  III,    10.  2.  3|          of mortality from CHD and stroke. CVD risk is associated
124  III,    10.  2.  3|            reduction is larger for stroke events, while the reduction
125  III,    10.  2.  4| insertion-deletion polymorphism in stroke (increase of risk) and Alzheimer’
126  III,    10.  3.  4|         wide range of causes. Heat stroke, although widely underreported,
127  III,    10.  5.  2|    diseases such as heart disease, stroke and mental illness (BMA,
128  III,    10.  5.  2|         within rural settings, the stroke incidence per 100.000 citizens
129  III,    10.  5.  2|           Powles, J et al. (2002): Stroke in urban and rural populations
130   IV,    11.  4    |            early rehabilitation in strokePopulation based screening
131   IV,    12.  5    |             myocardial infarction, stroke)~- Sentinel Networks (e.
132   IV,    13.  2.  2|        over 20% of CHD, and 10% of stroke in developed countries is
133  Key,   Ap5.  0.  0|       stomach~streptococcus~stress~stroke~suicidal~suicide~suicides~